Far Cry 6 | Motor Accessibility Video

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Far Cry 6 is a first-person open world adventure game developed and published by Ubisoft. The game’s controls can be complex and do require access to the majority of the controller to be able to play the game fully, but there are a variety of different settings that can potentially help to make the game a more accessible experience, which we will look at in this video. We will look at accessibility, gameplay and control options related to the motor accessibility of the game, including features such as Auto Steering, removing the need for repeated button presses, combining Move and Look control and the Motor Accessibility Preset option.

Set on the fictional island of Yara, players can participate in story missions, side quests or simply explore the large open world. Players can explore on foot, ride horses, drive cars, trucks, quad bikes and motorbikes, fly aeroplanes and helicopters and drive boats and jet skis. The game features a wide range of weapons to use against enemy characters, from more traditional Sniper Rifles to the fictional Resolver Weapons. Far Cry 6 is available for PS4, PS5, Xbox One, Xbox Series consoles and PC. In this video we will be focussing on the console version of the game when played with a gamepad, and all footage is captured on an Xbox Series S. Some of the in-game settings appear in several different menus, but we will cover each of them once only.

Motor Accessibility Settings

The Motor Accessibility Settings can be accessed via the main menu, and you can also access it by pausing the game at any point, scrolling across to System, and then down to Accessibility. When you first load up the game there is the option to switch on the Motor Preset, but this can also be accessed at any time from the menu. Switching this on will turn on a variety of settings on that the developer feels might be a helpful combination, but you can also adjust each individual setting. Now we will have a look at these settings in a bit more detail.

By default, when using Sniper Rifles, the game has Reticle Sway switched on. This means that the cross hair will sway when aiming, and you have to line up your shot, taking this sway into account. Pressing Left Stick Click or L3 will make your character hold their breath, which helps for a few seconds, but the cross hair will start moving again. If players find aiming difficult, there is the option to switch Reticle Sway off completely.

At times during gameplay, players might need to press a button repeatedly or take part in quick time events. It is possible to reduce these to a single button press by switching Repeated Presses off.

There are Aim Assist and Lock-on options in this menu, which also appear in the Gameplay menu, and we will look at this more detail a bit later on in the video.

Driving and Shooting Aim Assist is on by default. Having this setting on means that, when driving, if you draw your weapon you will automatically aim your gun at the nearest enemy.

Switching the option Convert Holds to Presses on means that actions which are usually activated by holding the button down, such as Aiming Down Sights and Crouching, will now be activated by a single button press. A second button press stops the action. If you would prefer to have Crouch set to Toggle and Aim Down Sights set to Hold, it is possible to leave this option off, and scroll down to select which actions you would like to be either be Toggle or Hold. The options are for Aiming, Crouching and Opening the Weapon Wheel. Switching on Convert Holds to Presses also means that actions such as Opening Crates, which you usually do by holding a button down, will now be activated by tapping the button twice instead.

There is also the option to change the Sprint Type, which by default is activated by pushing forward on the Left Stick with a single press of the Left Stick Click or L3 button. By setting this to Stick Incline, the more you push the Left Stick forward, the faster your character will move until finally sprinting. This could be helpful for those who find clicking the Left Stick difficult. There is also the No Stick Presses option, which automatically sets the Left Stick to Stick Incline and maps other Stick Click actions such as Holding Breath whilst Aiming to Y or Triangle, and Melee to a double tap of B or Circle.

Gameplay Options

There are also options in the Gameplay settings menu that may help to make the game more accessible for some players.

There is the option to change the game difficulty between Action Mode, which is the default Far Cry difficulty, and Story Mode. When playing in Story Mode, your character can take more damage which can help to reduce the challenge when in combat or playing missions.  You can change the difficulty at any time.

There is also the option to switch Aiming Assists on or off. The assist is on by default and helps during combat situations. There is also the option to switch on Lock-on Aim. Lock-on Aim means that when aiming at an enemy, the Aim Assist is a bit stronger and can help by completely locking onto the target. You can also select how long you want the lock on to be activated for.

By default, the Auto Steer option is set to automatic, but can be switched to manual if you prefer. This setting, when set to automatic, means that your car will automatically steer when you are aiming your gun at an enemy whilst driving. Manual means you would have to manage both aiming and steering at the same time.

Automatic Change Seat is on by default. With this setting on, you can climb into the passenger seat of a vehicle and your character will automatically move over to the driver’s seat. Having this setting off means you have to manually change seats.

Switching Disable Autodrive Whilst Aiming on means that your car will not automatically steer whilst aiming.

Controller options

There are a range of options within the Controller settings that could help to make the game more accessible. Far Cry 6 has multiple different gameplay scenarios, from walking, swimming, driving multiple vehicles, flying planes and helicopters and riding horses. Due to this, there are complex controls. However, the game also provides the option to remap controls based on each different scenario, with remapping options for when on foot, when flying a plane, and when driving a car, etc.

One option is to swap the controller from Default to Lefty, which swaps several buttons around and may be useful for players who like playing first-person games in Southpaw Mode.  

There is also the option to set the controller to a One-Handed Layout, picking either Left or Right Handed, which may make it easier to play the game with a single hand.

There are Sensitivity options for looking and aiming, with the higher the value the faster the camera rotation. There are also Sensitivity options for Left Stick Responsiveness and Right Stick Responsiveness, with the higher the value the lower the incline required to reach the maximum value of the stick. This can help reduce how much effort is required to get the stick to its maximum value.

You can set the Hold to Press and Toggle options from this menu as well. There is the option to set the No Stick Presses option on from this menu, which means that the Stick Clicks are remapped to other parts of the controller. Having this option switched on automatically moves the Left Stick to Stick Incline.

It is possible to Combine Move and Look onto the same stick, so Forwards and Backwards on the Left Stick acts as Forwards and Backwards, and Left and Right on the Left Stick acts as Rotate Left and Right.

The developer recommends having Swap Move and Look While Aiming on at the same time as Combining Move and Look, which means that when you aim down sights, the Left Stick will now control aiming. Some players may find it easier to navigate the game with a single stick with these settings on, or may also use both sticks but prefer having the sticks mapped this way. With the Combine Move and Look setting on, the Right Stick will control looking up and down, and strafing left and right.

There are several options to Invert Stick Movement, such as Invert Vertical Look, Invert Horizontal Look and you can also Invert both Third-Person Vertical Look and Horizontal Look. You play the game in third person when at various bases across the map.

When remapping your controller, first scroll down to the control that you would like to swap. Here, we are clicking on Shoot, to swap it from RT. We are going to map it to a single press of A, by clicking on Shoot and then pressing A. You will get a warning if this creates a conflicting action. Here, we now have both Shoot and Jump mapped to A. You can choose to ignore this and continue, or unassign the action. Here we are going to continue with this remapping. Now, when A is pressed, the character will Shoot and Jump at the same time. To get around this, you can reset the controls back to Default, or map either Shoot or Jump over to a different button.

You will notice that some actions are set to Hold, such as having to hold down Right Stick Click to Move a Body, which can be useful if trying to conceal enemies you have killed when playing stealthily. Here we will demonstrate how you set button presses to Holds, by holding down A to remap this action to Hold A. Press Y and then A again to revert back to Default.

By default, some in-game controls, such as Firing the Supremos, are activated by pressing two buttons at the same time. There is the option to map button presses to a single button press, a single button hold, or a double press of a single button. You can also map it to pressing two buttons together, holding two buttons together, or pressing the two buttons together twice.

It is possible to remap some analogue actions to Toggle. Instead of holding Left Stick Up to walk forwards, we are going to set it to Toggle, so a single press of Left Stick Up will start walking forwards, and a second press of Left Stick Up will stop walking. It is also possible to remap walking to digital actions such as a press or hold of the A or Cross button, for example.

It is also possible to toggle Accelerate, although this does work differently. By default, you will accelerate when R2 or RT are pressed. You can have this set so that a single press of the button will start your vehicle accelerating, and to go faster, press the button again. To slow down, press the brake button.

There are a range of different settings in Far Cry 6, and we hope that this video has helped to highlight some of those which we think might be helpful for people who may benefit from motor accessibility options. If you have any questions about video game accessibility, please contact SpecialEffect.

Far Cry 6 [PEGI 18] is a first-person adventure game developed by Ubisoft, and is available to play on Xbox One, Xbox Series X/S, PS4, PS5 and PC. In this video we will take a look at accessibility, gameplay and control options related to the motor accessibility of the game, including features such as Auto Steering, removing the need for repeated button presses, combining Move and Look control and the Motor Accessibility Preset option. All footage is captured on an Xbox Series S.

Video Timestamps (clicking on links will take you to view them in YouTube):

0:00 Intro

1:29 Motor Accessibility Settings (incl. Motor Preset, Reticle Sway, Repeated Presses and Converting Holds to Presses).

4:15 Gameplay Options (incl. Difficulty, Aim Assist, Lock-on Aim and Auto Steer).

6:05 Controller Options (incl. One-Handed Layout, Sensitivity options, Toggle options and Combine Look and Move to the same stick).

11:00 Outro

More posts on accessibility features in games can be found on our site using the Accessibility Feature tag.

If you have any questions, please visit the ‘Contact Us’ page.


Music: Cloud of Memories by Macifif & Tomb by Veshza (artlist.io)

 

Halo Infinite | Motor Accessibility video

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Halo Infinite is a first-person shooter developed  by 343 Industries, and is available to play on Xbox One, Xbox Series consoles and PC. The game is a single-player campaign with co-op to be added to the campaign at a later date and also consists of a range of free-to-play multiplayer modes. As well as being a first-person shooter with multiple weapons to use when on foot,  there are various vehicles which you can  control from a third-person viewpoint and a variety of different in-game settings that may make Halo Infinite more accessible. There are also several modes which can be both fun to play and useful for practising or for trying control settings. In this video we’ll have a look at the motor accessibility of the game through the controller settings and also some of these game modes. Whilst mouse and keyboard are available on each  platform we’ll be looking at controller settings.  The equivalent setting is often available for mouse and keyboard too, however. All footage is captured on an Xbox Series S.

The controller settings can either be accessed via the Main Menu or by pausing the game at any time.  Pause the game by pressing the Menu button and then go to Settings. Controller Settings are then the first available option. As well as the Default Layout there are five  alternative layouts that gamers can choose from.  These are Legacy, Bumper Jumper, Recon,  Button Puncher and Hell Puncher. Alternatively you can create a Custom  Layout by remapping button presses.  We will cover button remapping a bit later on in the video. There are four different thumbstick layouts. These are Default, Legacy, Southpaw and Legacy Southpaw.

It is possible to Invert Look for  both horizontal or vertical directions and you can also Invert the camera when in flight.

You can toggle the controls for Crouch, Zoom and  Sprint. This means that you can tap the button to start the action and tap it again to stop,  rather than needing to hold the button down.  Crouch and Sprint are toggled by default but Zoom is set to Hold.

By default, driving vehicles in Halo Infinite  requires the use of both analog sticks, by pushing up and down on the Left Stick to accelerate and brake and reverse,  and the Right Stick is used left and right for steering.  With Movement Assisted Steering switched On, you can now use Left Stick left and right to help with steering, in addition to steering with  the Right Stick. It is set to Off by default.

With Maintain Sprint switched Off you will stop  sprinting after certain actions such as jumping.  With it switched on you will continue to sprint after those actions which  means you would not need to press the  Sprint button again. It is on by default.

With Auto Clamper set to On, if you jump near a ledge you do not need to press Jump again to climb onto the ledge. This is also on by default.

By default your in-game jump can be quite high  which is helpful when trying to jump onto higher ledges, but can also make it difficult when  trying to accurately jump to lower heights.  Having Step Jump switched on reduces the  jump height when jumping to lower ledges  meaning it can be easier to accurately reach them. It is set to On by default.

There are a range of Sensitivity, Acceleration and Deadzone settings that may be useful for players. To find the best combination for you it would be best to try experimenting with the different options. Adjusting these may mean that less or more movement of the analog sticks is needed. Look Acceleration allows you to set the  acceleration for the Look thumbstick.  You can set the Look Sensitivity for both horizontal and vertical directions. Holding down Left Trigger in Halo Infinite will cause you to aim down sights and to some extent zoom in depending on which gun you are using at the time. It is possible to change the sensitivity for each of the different zoom levels separately so the sensitivity of an assault rifle could be different than the sensitivity of a sniper rifle when aiming down sights, for example. First select the Zoom Level that you wish to adjust. Now go down to Zoom Sensitivity and adjust how sensitive you want that specific zoom level to be. This will only change the sensitivity of weapons that use that specific zoom level. The Center Deadzone setting allows you to set  how far the Move or Look thumbstick is from the centre before the minimum input registers, with lower values feeling more responsive. The Max Input Threshold setting allows you to set how far from the edge the  Move or Look thumbstick needs to be before the maximum input is registered. The Axial Deadzone setting allows you to change  how far the Move or Look thumbstick is from the X or Y axis before the minimum input registers. The  lower the value the more responsive it will feel.

You can remap your controller by scrolling down to On Foot and selecting which control you would like to remap.  First select the button you would like to remap and press A. Now press the button you would like to remap it to. You may get a warning letting you know that you are now unbinding that button from another action. Press A to continue. You can remap most of the buttons on the Xbox controller but you cannot remap button presses to joystick directions or vice versa.

We will now have a look at some of the  different modes available. The Campaign Mode specifically has several difficulty settings which can make the game more or less challenging. Difficulty can be selected when starting a new campaign or if you want to change it mid-game, go to End Game and then from the Main Menu choose Load Game and choose one of the options:  Easy, Normal, Heroic or Legendary. There are also several different modes that can be both fun to play and also useful for practice for players trying new settings or those who want to progress to playing competitive multiplayer matches online. Bot Bootcamp can be selected from the Multiplayer Menu and is a multiplayer match where four people online can cooperatively play  a variety of different match types versus bots.  Within the Academy Menu players can select a tutorial which is described as basic training, running through the controls and learning how to play the game. There is also the option to participate in weapon drills. One of the guns featured in the game can be selected and there are three different drills for each gun. The first drill has you shooting your chosen weapon at stationary bots for a specific period of time to see how many points you can get. In the second drill the bots are moving which creates more of a challenge and in the third drill the bots are moving but will also try and take cover. To play a game versus bots in Training Mode, first you have to select a map or you can choose to play on the pre-selected map. Once the match has started, pause the game and  you will see multiple options that you can select. You can choose different primary weapons secondary  weapons and two different types of grenade. You can also select different types of  equipment such as swapping out the Grappleshot (or grappling hook) for a Threat Sensor  that highlights enemies if they’re within range. You can also select how many Friendly Bots from 0 – 3 and how many Enemy Bots from 0 – 4 and there  are also four levels of Bot Difficulty. It is possible to have Reveal Enemy Location set to Default or to Always On, potentially making it easier to find enemies on the map. Switching Playfighting On means  that Enemy Bots will not fight back. Switching on Infinite Ammo means that you will not run out of ammunition for any of the weapons that you are using. You will still need to reload  but can do so an unlimited number of times. The Deathless setting makes you invincible when switched On. Although the mode can help as a way to create training matches, it can also be  a fun way to experience the game with no pressure to progress to playing online versus other players. Within Custom Game you can create your own multiplayer matches which you can play online versus other players or offline versus bots. Although it doesn’t have the same number of settings as Training Mode and as such may not be as accessible for all players, it does allow you to replicate the type of matches you’ll be playing if you then choose to go online.

We hope that this post has been helpful. If you would like any help with video game accessibility, please contact SpecialEffect.

Halo Infinite [PEGI 16] is a first-person shooter developed by 343 Industries, and is available to play on Xbox One, Xbox Series X/S and PC. In this video we will have a look at the motor accessibility of the game through the controller settings and also some of the available game modes. All footage is captured on an Xbox Series S.

Timestamps: 

0:00 Intro 

01:14 Controller Settings 

02:14 Movement & Aiming 

04:12 Sensitivity & Acceleration 

06:05 Controller Remapping 

06:42 Game Modes 

10.24 Outro

More posts on accessibility features in games can be found on our site using the Accessibility Feature tag.

If you have any questions, please visit the ‘Contact Us’ page.


Video by: Cara Jessop

Music: Quiet Pull by Tamuz Dekel, from artlist.io.

Forza Horizon 5 | Motor Accessibility Video

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Forza Horizon 5 is an open world racing game, available on Xbox One, Xbox Series consoles and PC. It is the latest in Playground games Forza Horizon series, and features an open world to explore, objectives to complete and players can also race against both AI-controlled cars and other players online. Forza Horizon 5 has a range of different settings that are carried over from the previous game in the series, but it also has some new options that could be beneficial for many players. In this video we will be looking at the new accessibility features in this franchise related to the motor accessibility of the game. These include the Offline Game Speed feature, an Auto-Steering assist and a new Tourist Difficulty level option.

The first new feature we will look at is Tourist Mode. This is a new difficulty setting which can be switched on from the main menu, from the menu when pausing the game, or at the start of a race. Tourist Mode cannot be switched on part way through a race and can only be used when playing vs AI. With Tourist mode switched on, if the player crashes mid-race or finds that they are someway behind the AI opponents, the opponents will slow down, allowing the player to catch up. Once they have started to catch the group up, the AI will then begin racing again, and the player is able to compete with them to try and get into first place.

Within Difficulty settings, there is a range of assists that could be helpful. One way to switch these on or off, is by selecting a Driving Assists Preset. There are four presets to choose from, plus you can create a custom preset. The Easy Preset, for example, switches on Assisted Braking, plus several other helpful assists such as Traction Control. It leaves steering as Standard, but in Forza Horizon 5 there is the option to change this to Assisted or Auto-steering, and create a custom preset.

Auto-steering is applied providing you have an onscreen racing line, such as when you are either in a race (or challenge) or have selected a destination on your map. By holding down accelerate, the car will try and stick to the racing line, and will automatically steer for you, meaning that you do not need the Left Stick when driving in most instances and only require it for accessing menus and setting a waypoint. The car will drive into other vehicles and knock them out of the way, so whilst you can choose to manually steer to get around other cars, this is not required. If you are driving at a high speed, the car may come off of the racing line with Auto-steering on, so you either may need to release accelerate or brake manually in some instances.

With the Braking Assist on, you can play just by holding down accelerate to brake and steer automatically, until you reach your destination or complete the race. Releasing accelerate appropriately can increase your control of the vehicle. This is a way to play with a single button, but you can add the left joystick and a button for brake.

The other new steering assist, Assisted Steering can be helpful for players who have access to the Left Stick but feel that they would benefit from some help with steering. The assist tries to keep you close to the racing line, but you do also need to steer to avoid coming off the road and crashing.

Forza Horizon 5 has an accessibility setting that allows players to reduce the offline game speed. By default, the game is set to 100%, which is the standard speed. If players find that this is too fast, and that they would benefit from more time to react, then it is possible to reduce the speed. The car is still able to travel at its maximum speed, but the game is running in slow motion, which may make it easier for some players to enjoy the game and race successfully. To change the speed, pause the game, go to settings and then go to accessibility.

This is the game running at 55% speed. And now, at 40%, which is the lowest speed.  The lower the speed, the more time the player has to react.

In addition to these new features, Forza Horizon 5 features some options that appeared in Forza Horizon 4 , including remapping, and it is also possible to change several settings in the advanced controls menu, such as inverting the vertical camera and changing multiple deadzones. Being able to create a custom control scheme and changing these settings could be helpful for many players, and these settings are similar to those found in Forza Horizon 4.

We hope that this video has been helpful. If you have any questions about motor accessibility in video games, please contact SpecialEffect.

Forza Horizon 5 [PEGI 3] is an open world racing game, available on Xbox One, Xbox Series consoles and PC. It has a range of different settings that are carried over from the previous game in the series, but is also has some new options that could be beneficial for many players.

In this video we will be looking at the new accessibility features in this franchise related to the motor accessibility of the game; these include the Offline Game Speed feature, an Auto-Steering assist and a new Tourist difficulty level option.

Video Timestamps (links will take you to view them in YouTube):

0:00 Intro

0:50 Tourist Difficulty Option

1:30 Driving Assists Preset Options

1:53 Auto-Steering Option

3:01 Assisted Steering Option

3:15 Offline Game Speed Option

4:10 Outro incl. other options (Remapping and Deadzones)

An additional post going through these options, can be found here: https://gameaccess.info/forza-horizon-5-controls-and-motor-accessibility-settings/ 


Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla | Motor Accessibility

Title Screen
A transcript for this video can be found the bottom of this post.
Show Transcript

Assassin’s Creed Valhalla is an action-adventure game with a large open world to explore and a variety of quests to complete. The game is available on Xbox One, Xbox Series consoles, PS4, PS5 and PC. In this video we will be covering the console versions of the game when played with a standard controller. The game’s controls are complex and full access requires the majority of the controller but there are several accessibility options that can potentially be helpful and we’ll be looking at these in this video. All footage in this video is captured on an Xbox Series S.  

You can access the options via the main menu, or at any time during gameplay by pausing the game and pressing left on the D-pad. Now go to Options.

To help with accessing menus there is the option to select how long you need to hold down a button in order to change the setting.  For example, to upgrade equipment in the Inventory Menu you usually have to hold the button down, but you can shorten how long this button is held down for.

You can toggle several in-game moves such as Crouching,  Aiming Down Sights and accessing the Quick Wheel. This means you can tap the button once to start the action, such as Crouching, and then tap it again to stop the action. This means there is less of a need to hold buttons down in certain aspects of gameplay.

There are multiple options for inverting certain joystick movements such as the Raven Vertical Controls, the X and Y axis in general gameplay and the X and Y axis when Aiming Down Sights.

It is possible to change the intensity of the controller vibration which can be helpful for some players.

There are several settings for swapping joysticks to make the Left Stick act as Right Stick and vice versa. You can do this when accessing the menus, you can swap sticks for when in gameplay and keep the menu controls as standard, and you can also swap sticks for both menus and gameplay. Whichever you choose, this only changes your controls when accessing the game and your controls will stay the same when accessing the console’s operating system.  As well as swapping joystick functions, it’s also possible to remap button presses and you can swap the majority of the controls around. Please note that you cannot map button presses to joystick movements or vice versa.  To swap a button go to the in-game action that you would like to swap and press A or Cross to select it. Now press the button that you would like to swap this action to. If you swap buttons that may create a conflict with another action a warning will appear onscreen. If you change your mind press Y or Triangle to reset the controls back to Default.

There are several settings that you can change in the Gameplay options that might be helpful. There is the option to change controls for Quick Time Events from repeated presses to a button hold, or a one-time press, or you can switch them off completely.

There are several settings for Difficulty, so that you can customise the experience.  Combat Difficulty varies from Easy to Very Hard. There are three settings for Aim Assist: Full, Partial or Off.  Stealth difficulty varies from Easy to Hard.

You can set Guaranteed Assassination on, which means that when using stealth even most of the powerful enemies can be assassinated using a single attack. Please note that this does not work on Zealots who cannot be killed via assassination and must either be avoided or killed in combat. 

The Exploration difficulty setting essentially adjusts how much information the game provides for you and how much you will need to discover manually through exploration. Adventurer guides the player the most and Pathfinder guides you the least.

The range of settings means that if you found combat difficult but wanted more of a challenge when playing stealthily, you can adjust the settings to suit you.

There is the option to have the Camera set to Close Camera which brings the viewpoint closer to the character, which some players may prefer.  The camera will return to the default view during certain situations such as when swimming or when in combat.

When in game there are a few options that can be really helpful for some players. When riding your horse you can hold down the X or Square button to follow the road so that the horse will automatically ride along that road. If you have a destination selected on your map you can now press Y or Triangle to ride towards that destination.  You can also automatically sail when in the long boat by holding down X or Square to follow a river and then press Y or Triangle to go towards your destination if you have one selected on your map. If your boat crashes at any point you may need to start this process again to continue. Following the road or the river and having either the horse or boat take you to your destination means that you do not need to do anything on the journey. This can be helpful if you need to rest during gameplay or find controlling the horse or boat difficult.

From the Main Menu you can also select Discovery Tour which is a mode that allows you to explore the world without combat or any risk of damage. The controls are quite reduced compared to the standard game and the lack of combat may suit many players. There are also story missions that you can participate in that allow you to learn about the time period and also the game itself. There is also the option to play in both third- and first-person viewpoints. Due to the reduced controls, there are less options to make changes but there are several things that you can alter and button remapping is still available.

Many thanks for watching this video. If you have any questions about video game accessibility please contact SpeciaEffect.

Assassin’s Creed: Valhalla [PEGI 18] is an action-adventure game with a large open world to explore and a variety of quests to complete. The game is available on Xbox One, Xbox Series consoles, PS4, PS5 and PC.

In this video we look at the console version of the game when played with a standard controller. The game’s controls are complex and full access requires use of the majority of the controller, but there are several accessibility options, such as quick time event, toggle and difficulty options that could potentially be helpful and these are explored in this video. All footage in this video is captured on an Xbox Series S.

A written post on the topics covered in this video can be found here: https://gameaccess.info/assassins-creed-valhalla-accessibility-settings/ 

Video Timestamps (links take you to YouTube): 

1:00 Menu Hold Factor Option

1:17 Toggle Control Options

1:37 Inverted Control Options

1:55 Vibration Option

2:04 Analog Stick Swapping Options

2:30 Remapping Button/Trigger Presses

3:08 Quick Time Event Options

3:20 Combat Difficulty Options

3:33 Aim Assist Options

3:59 Stealth Difficulty Options

4:21 Exploration Difficulty Options

4:44 Close Camera Option

5:04 Follow Road Option on Horseback

5:22 Follow River Option in Boat 6:01 Discovery Tour Mode

6:35 Discovery Tour Mode First/Third Person Option 

*Update* 14/12/21 A Difficulty Settings Update has added more features. These include, “…various sub-sections to the combat, stealth, and exploration options in the Gameplay tab. This will allow you to customize your combat and stealth experience in Assassin’s Creed Valhalla to your preference.”

Read more about these on the Ubisoft website.

If you have any questions about motor accessibility in video games, please contact us.


Video by Cara Jessop

Music: Skogsdrommar – Stripped Version by Blackbard (artlist.io).

 

 

Microsoft Flight Simulator | Assists and Casual Controls

Microsoft Flight Simulator (PEGI 3) is the latest in Microsoft’s series of flight simulators and was released on PC in 2020 and both Xbox Series X and S in 2021. In this video and written post we will be focussing on the console version of the game when played using an Xbox controller, such as a standard controller,  an Xbox Adaptive Controller or an alternative compatible controller. All gameplay footage and screen shots are captured on an Xbox Series S.

This type of game is generally known for having complex controls and gameplay, and as a simulator the game is able to provide an in-depth and technically challenging experience for those who want it. However, it also has a range of settings that could help make it a much more accessible experience for many players and also allow the game experience to be enjoyed more casually. In this video we will be focussing on playing this way with the full range of flight control-related accessibility settings switched on.

A screenshot from behind a small aircraft flying over Oxfordshire towards Blenheim Palace.

We will first look at the settings and then show how you can start the game with your plane already in the sky, which means that you do not need to either take off or land, and can potentially play with access to less controls. We will then look at the AI controlled plane, meaning that you can ask the computer to fly for you, before taking a look at the basic controls for taking off and landing a small aircraft, which means that you would potentially need to use more inputs on the controller. Finally, we will have a quick look at the controller remapping options to customise the control inputs you use.

Settings

A screenshot showing the All Assists options in menu.

On first start-up, the game will offer some different settings including assistance settings. By default, the selected option is All Assists. These can also be accessed after this by heading to Options and then Assistance Options, where you can also select from three different global accessibility settings.

All Assists provides both assistance and instructions when in flight by an AI co-pilot. Middle Ground provides some guidance, but less so than All Assists. True to Life is designed to provide a more authentic experience with less help from the AI. All three of these global settings also allow you to customise individual assistance settings by clicking on each option. For example, if you wanted all of the assists on but wanted to switch off Unlimited Fuel, you can do this by going into Aircraft Systems and switching Unlimited Fuel off. This means that you have the benefits of the assists when controlling the game, but still have to consider fuel consumption and plan your flight around this, which some players might enjoy. To change back to default and have all of the assists switched on, press X.

Flying with One Stick Only

Small aircraft shown from behind flying over sea towards land.

To start a journey, you can either start on a runway or in the sky. If you choose to start on the runway you can either manually take off or opt for the AI co-pilot to take off for you. If you would like to start in the sky, you potentially will not need access to as many controls, and you can also pick anywhere in the world as your departure location. The first option is to try the Discovery Flights, which can be accessed via the Main Menu or by pausing the game at any time.

A screenshot showing some of the Discovery Flights locations.

Here there are several experiences that are included as part of the initial download of the game, and several more which you can download. By clicking on one that you have already downloaded, you will start that flight already in the sky.

You control the plane with the Left Stick, by default controlling the pitch axis by pulling back to ascend, forwards to descend and left and right on the stick to control the roll axis, to steer the plane left and right. It is possible to enjoy casual flights, exploring locations just using the Left Stick, especially within the Discovery Flights.

It is worth noting that by just using the left stick, you do not have some of the other basic controls such as throttle control, meaning that you cannot control the speed of the plane. This means that it may not be possible to ascend to the maximum height, so getting over higher ground can be difficult. One useful assist included in the All Assists option is the AI Anti-Stall Assist which will keep the engine running if you attempt to ascend or descend too quickly.

A screenshot of the Sensitivity options.

There is the option to go into the settings and change the sensitivity and deadzone of the stick which may be helpful for some players. A lower sensitivity combined with a larger deadzone may mean that the game does not pick up some accidental movement of the left stick.

A screenshot of the Flight Assistant options.

Another way to use a single stick would be to have the AI control the plane, and you can use the right stick to control the camera whilst the computer controls the plane for you. To set up AI control, press the Left Stick Click to enter Cursor Mode; the AI will temporarily take over controls whilst in this mode. Now, go to the Flight Assistant option and press A. Move the cursor down and select AI Piloting. Click on the small Cross icon or Flight Assistant icon to close the window, and then press Left Stick Click again to enter Cursor Mode. The AI will now control the plane for you, giving you the option to use the Right Stick to look around.  Right Stick Click will recentre the camera.

A screenshot showing the view from inside a small aircraft.

If you wish to see from inside the plane, press the View button and then use right stick to look around. It is worth noting that whilst the AI pilot can take off and control the plane, taking you to your next destination, it can at times fail to adapt to certain situations and may not fly around or over obstacles, and may crash. Despite this, it could be useful for many players who wish to play with a single stick or who need to take a rest when playing. To switch the AI Pilot off, you need to go back into Cursor Mode and switch it off manually.

A screenshot of the world map.

You can also choose to start from the sky by heading to the world map and clicking on any starting location. If you would prefer to start at an airport or airfield, you can do this also, but will need to take off or get the AI pilot to take off for you.

More Controls

If you have access to some of buttons and the trigger inputs on the controller along with the Left Stick, you will be able to fly with more manual control of the plane’s functions to control actions such as speed, yaw and braking to enable manual take-off and landing, whilst still using the assistance settings.

If you have access to the Right Stick, you can use this to control the camera which can be useful for looking around in these situations to navigate your surroundings. The use of the Left and Right Stick can be alternated as they do not have to be used simultaneously. The Right Stick is also used for scrolling to navigate many of the menus, along with the Left Stick which controls a cursor. The D-pad can be used as an alternative way to navigate some menus.

A screenshot showing some of the Take-Off and Landing Flight Training missions.

It may be useful to try some of the training activities to practice and learn more about the controls and handling of the plane for these situations. We will go through some of the more commonly used controls used for casual flying with All Assists on, including some of those used for taking off and landing a small plane. Controls can be remapped in-game, which we will discuss later on in this post.

By default, the A button is to increase power with the throttle, which can be used to increase speed whilst in the air or on the ground and can cause the plane to increase altitude (depending on your pitch). You hold the A button down until you have reached your target rpm and then release it. The B button, by default, is used to decrease power with the throttle which will lower your speed and can reduce altitude, again depending on your pitch. You hold the B button until you have reached your target rpm and then release it.

Taking Off Basic Controls

A screenshot of a small aircraft from behind during take off.

First, press Left on D-pad to remove the parking brake. Now hold down on A to increase the throttle to maximum. If required, you can use the left and right triggers to control the rudder and keep the plane in centre with the runway, although in clear conditions this may not be required. When prompted, pull back gently on the Left Stick to take off.

Landing Controls

A screenshot of a small aircraft from behind when landing.

When landing, B can be used to decrease the throttle. Left Stick can be used to line up with the runway, bring the nose down and flair the nose just before touching down. X is then used to brake once on the runway and the triggers can then be used to turn the plane on the runway. Up and Down on the D-pad can be used to adjust the plane’s flaps which can be used to slow the plane further. Right on the D-pad can be used to manually lower or raise the landing gear.

Remapping Casual Controls

A screenshot showing the controller remapping.

If you find that accessing certain parts of the controller are easier than others, then there are some remapping options that might help. Head to the Options tab, and then Control Options. From here pick the control that you would like to change, and select which input you would like to change it to. The game may warn you if this button is already mapped to another control so in some instances it may be best to do a complete swap, especially if you are swapping with a control that you do not need.

A screenshot of a small aircraft shown from behind flying over mountains.

We hope that this post and video about playing Microsoft Flight Simulator in a more casual way have been helpful. If you have any questions about video game accessibility, please contact us.

Watch Dogs: Legion | Motor Accessibility

In-game street scene
Screenshot of Watch Dogs: Legion

Watch Dogs: Legion (PEGI 18) is the third instalment in Ubisoft’s open world action-adventure series. The game is set in a futuristic London, where players must recruit other playable characters and complete a variety of missions.

The game requires access to the majority of the controller to have full access, but it also has a range of settings such as button remapping, aim assists to autodriving, which can potentially help to make it more accessible for some players.

In this post we will have a look at some of these settings related to the motor accessibility . Watch Dogs: Legion is available on Xbox One, Xbox Series consoles, PS4, PS5 and PC. This post will be focussing on the console version.

A Screenshot of the Watch Dogs: Legion menu showing access to Gameplay, Controller, Online, Audio and Language, HUD, Display and Accessibility menus.

Gameplay Settings

Within the Gameplay settings menu, there is a list of options that could be helpful for some players.

Difficulty

A screenshot of the Watch Dogs: Legion Gameplay menu, with Single Player Difficulty option highlighted currently.

There are three difficulty settings (Easy, Normal or Hard), that will affect things such as enemy alertness and enemy weapon damage.

Permadeath Mode

A screenshot of the Watch Dogs legion Gameplay menu, with Permadeath Mode option highlighted currently.

During the game, you complete missions that then allow you to recruit the majority of the other characters that you come across in the game, including many of those you see when travelling around the city. As standard, if any of these characters take lethal damage when playing they go to hospital or prison and will respawn after a period of time, and you can keep them as part of your team. However, with Permadeath Mode enabled, if you lose a life then you lose that character permanently (unless they are arrested). You can choose to have Permadeath Mode on and then switch it off part way through a playthrough. However, once you have switched Permadeath off, you cannot switch it back on again for that playthrough.

Camera Centering

This option allows you have the camera auto adjust to the direction you are facing. This can be set to auto adjust when sprinting only, always on, or always off.

 Melee Mode

A screenshot of a melee combat scenario in Watch Dogs: Legion, showing two characters in a street.

By default, Melee Combat involves tapping on the A/Cross button for each individual punch/kick. Melee Mode allows you to hold the button down to continually strike as long as the button is held. This can be helpful if rapidly tapping buttons is difficult.

 Climbing Mode

When on foot, your operative will need to climb and jump over obstacles in game.  When setting Climbing Mode to hold, you can keep A/Cross held down whilst moving forward with the left stick to continually climb. You can also have it set so that a single tap will allow you to jump over one obstacle, and means that you do not need to keep the button held down.

Toggle Options

A screenshot of the Watch Dogs: Legion  Gameplay menu with Emote Wheel Mode option highlighted currently.

There are several controls that can be set to either Hold or Toggle. This means they can be set so that a single press will start the action and a second press of that button will stop performing that action. The following actions can be set to Hold/Toggle: entering Hacking Mode, entering Aiming Mode (aim down sights), and for accessing both the Weapon Wheel and the Emote Wheel.

Controller Settings

Control Scheme

A screenshot of the Watch Dogs: Legion Default controls scheme on a diagram of an Xbox Series controller.

Watch Dogs: Legion has four different control schemes; Default, and three different left-handed options. Within each of these control schemes, there are eight different layouts for On Foot controls, Driving, Drone, Turret, Camera, Crane, Spiderbot, Kick-Up, and Menu/Text chat. The controls are different depending on the situation you are in; for example, by default moving the left stick up and down moves your character forwards and back when on foot, but to move forwards when driving you would need to hold down RT/R2 to accelerate.

A screenshot of the Watch Dogs: Legion Control conflict screen.

It is also possible to create three different custom control schemes. To create a custom profile, choose the control that you want to change, and press A or Cross to reassign it. You can now select the button that you want to swap this action to. If there is a potential conflict with the controls, the game will give you three options: assign action to another button, leave unassigned, assign anyway.

In this example we have tried to move Parkour over to R2, which also acts as Sprint. We can either swap these buttons, leave the action unassigned, or map them to the same button. Mapping to the same button means that when holding down RT or R2 to Sprint, we will automatically vault over and climb any obstacles whilst sprinting. This could potentially be helpful as it means that it is possible to run and do parkour moves at the same time by only using one button, but could also mean that the player would accidently vault or climb over things unintentionally when sprinting.

Invert Options

Within the Controller settings there is the option to invert several controls. You can invert the Camera’s X Axis, the Camera’s Y Axis, Movement X Axis, and the Movement Y Axis.

Sensitivity

There are the options to change both the looking and aiming sensitivity separately. This means that if you needed general camera control to be more sensitive but wished for a lower sensitivity when aiming down sights, you could set each to your preference.

Aim Snap

A screenshot of Watch Dogs: Legion combat showing the player controller character in third person viewpoint with a gun raised and aimed at an character in the street coming towards them.

You can adjust how strongly you would like the camera to snap onto targets when aiming down sights. This can be set to Off, Default or Strong. Please note that within the Accessibility settings you can set “Aim Lock On” to On or Off. With this setting On, the Aim Snap option that you choose has no impact. Therefore, you can only use one of these settings at a time.

Aim Magnetism

This setting adjusts how strongly the camera movement slows down whilst aiming down sights at targets. It can be set to Default, Strong or Switched Off. It can potentially help by making aiming/shooting more accurate if you are aiming at a specific area of an enemy, such as when trying to carry out a headshot for example.

 Movement Settings  

Within movement settings you can adjust how sensitive you want the movement to be when on foot, when driving (steering), when controlling drones and when controlling the Spider. Increasing the sensitivity leads to faster response times.

Autodrive

A screenshot demonstrating Autodrive in Watch Dogs: Legion. The player controller vehicle has a path or blue arrows leading the way ahead of it in the street.

There are many vehicles that you can drive in Watch Dogs: Legion to travel around London, including cars, trucks, motorbikes, boats and large drones. Some of the cars, trucks and buses have the ability to utilise an option called Autodrive. You can do this by tapping A or Cross when your vehicle is either stationary or moving at a low speed and you will begin to follow the road. If you wish to travel to a specific location, you first need to set a waypoint on the in-game map. Once you have done this, tap A/Cross to start to Autodrive. The vehicle will follow the rules of the road and may take longer to get there than if you are driving it yourself, but can be a way to get to various locations if the you need a break or find driving difficult. Press A/Cross again to switch off Autodrive. Some of the vehicles that have this option will have a ((A)) logo on the windscreen. Note that motorbikes, boats, drones and all other vehicles do not have the Autodrive option.

We hope that this post has been helpful in highlighting some of the options in Watch Dogs: Legion. If you have any questions about video game accessibility, please Contact Us.