Call of Duty: Warzone Battle Royale | Controls Walkthrough Video

Show Transcript

Call of Duty: Warzone is a free-to-play Battle Royale game for PS4, Xbox One and PC. The game has up to 150 players fighting and surviving across a huge map, trying to be the last player or last team standing. It can be downloaded via the PlayStation Network, Xbox Store or Battle.net for PC. The game is cross-platform compatible, meaning that players on Xbox One can play against those on PS4 and PC, with gamepad and mouse and keyboard available on all platforms. Matchmaking does divide mouse and keyboard and gamepad players, however. The game can be played Solo or in a squad of up to four people with Trio and Quad Squad Matches available. There’s also a game mode called Plunder or Blood Money, along with variations in the Battle Royale game mode. These modes may come and go as the game is updated. This video is to complement our previous video on Call of Duty: Modern Warfare, which looked at the full gameplay controls and options which are also applicable to Warzone. This video will focus on the additional controls required in Warzone: Battle Royale mode. The previous video, as well as a GameAccess post to go alongside the video, both go through all the controls in-game for reference. The features shown in our Modern Warfare video such as Toggle options, Sensitivity settings and other Interaction options still apply here. Please watch that video for more information on the controls and other options and settings available. We will be focusing on the console versions of the game. We have tested it on a PS4 using a DUALSHOCK 4 controller. We will also mention the Xbox One controls. When you first load Warzoneit may load with the Bumper Ping control scheme selected. In this video we’ll be mainly focusing on the Default control scheme, as many players will be more used to this control scheme from playing other Call of Duty game modes. It is possible to change control settings via the Main Menu and also by pausing the game. The game features several options for practising including some tutorial modes and a short practice match versus bots. These can be helpful for learning the basic gameplay mechanics and controls. The Warzone game modes available in the menu often change to accommodate temporary modes but the Battle Royale mode is a constant feature often offering Solo, Trio and Quad Squad options. At the menu you can pick to load up either a Solo, Trio or Quad Match. As standard, in team matches the game will autofill your team to make it three or four, depending on whether you choose Trios or Quads. If you don’t want your squad to fill with people outside invited friends, select Don’t Fill in the Squad Fill option. To either invite or join friends you press Triangle and select them if you have already added them and if they are online, or you can add friends. This would be Y on Xbox One. Whichever mode you choose the first thing to load up ahead of the match is a lobby, where you can practise shooting against other players waiting to play. Once enough players have joined, the main game will load. In Warzone up to 150 players compete on a map aiming to be the last player or last team standing. You start with nothing except a pistol and search buildings to collect Equipment and Cash. As the match goes on the map size decreases as gas draws in and surviving players must move towards the Safe Zone. All players have one life. If you lose this life you drop your weapon and you get one opportunity each match to win another respawn by entering the Gulag: a 1v1 last player standing match. If you lose in the Gulag or are killed again after visiting the Gulag once, teammates can still potentially buy you back. Squad mates can also revive the player if they have been downed but not killed. At the beginning of a match you and all other players will be in a plane which travels across a flight path across the map. This can be a good opportunity to look at your Tac Map. You can access the Tac Map by pressing the touchpad button on PS4. This is the View button on an Xbox controller. You will notice a white circle appear on the map. This is the Safe Zone which indicates the initial area the gas will next draw in on. You can Zoom in and out of areas on the map and can also Ping a location on the map. This can show other players in your team where you think would be best to land and can also act as a guide point if playing in Solo. Only you and players on your team can see your Ping Marker. Now we will look at the Tac Map controls. This is the Default layout controls for Tac Map. Left Stick will continue to move your character in-game whilst the map is open. Right Stick moves the cursor around the Tac Map. Hold R1 to Zoom In, RB on Xbox. Hold L1 to Zoom Out. LB on Xbox. Up on D-pad to Ping. This creates a marker that both you and teammates can see. R3 is to delete the Ping. This is Right Stick Click on Xbox. L3 is used to move the cursor to player icon. This is the Left Stick Click on Xbox. If you press the touchpad or View button again you will close the map. Pressing Cross, or A, will cause you to jump out of the plane and you immediately start free-falling. Use the Left Analogue Stick to move in the air and the Right Stick to Look or Aim. Cross, or A, will open your parachute which you can do at any time. In the in-game settings there is the option to have Parachute Auto-Deploy, either enabled or disabled. If you choose to have it enabled then your parachute will automatically open once you get close to the ground. If you have this option disabled you will need to press Cross to open your parachute manually. This is A on Xbox. If you do not do this you will crash land and either need a teammate to revive you or you will lose your first life when playing in a Solo Match. When parachuting you can press Circle to cut your parachute and return to free-falling. B on Xbox. Note that even with Parachute Auto-Deploy enabled you will need to manually open the parachute the second time around as it will not auto-deploy twice. You can also hold L1 to Free Look in third person. This is LB on Xbox. Once you have landed you will have a pistol but no other equipment. You will need to gather equipment and although you may find some items on the floor it is worth listening out for the sound generated by crates. Crates may have a variety of objects in them including Weapons, Killstreaks, Ammunition and Cash, but rival players will be able to hear them and will be looking for them also. The Reload button is Square which also acts as Interacts. There are several ways in which you might use this button. This is X on Xbox. For example, to open crates you need to briefly hold the Interact button, for approximately half a second. This also includes opening Buy Stations from which you can purchase an extra life for a teammate, Killstreaks or some equipment. Once you have opened a crate, if you decide to pick up a weapon or Killstreak you need to hold the button down for around half a second again to pick up each item. Ammunition and Armor can be picked up simply by walking over them. You don’t need to press a button to do this although you can use the Interact button if not directly over something. You will also need to use Square, holding it for approximately half a second to pick up tactical and lethal items, Killstreaks, perks and to swap weapons. To open a crate you need to hold the Interact button for around half a second. If you need to revive a teammate you need to hold the button for around five seconds. You can also drop equipment. In-team based modes this can be to share with teammates or to make space to allow you to carry other items. To open the menu hold Down on the D-pad and use a Right Analogue Stick to cycle across to the item you want to drop. If you are dropping something you have in multiples, such as Ammo, you can press the Triangle button to drop some, or press the Square button to drop it all. This is Y and X on Xbox. Although you can usually just walk over Ammo to pick it up, to pick up anything that you have dropped back up, you will need to press the Square button. This is X on Xbox. To put on an Armor Plate hold the Triangle button for around half a second. This is Y on Xbox. Although when you see Armor the game tells you to hold Square to pick it up, you will also automatically pick it up by running or walking over it. If you lose your first life within the game, rather than it being game over you get one chance to win your way back into the game. The Gulag is a 1v1 match which you must win to continue playing. If you are playing a Solo Match the Gulag is literally your last chance to keep playing. In the team modes, however, if you lose you can spectate your team and if they collect enough in-game currency then they can buy you back into the game. Once in the Gulag you usually start in a waiting area where you can watch other players fight whilst waiting for your turn. If you press R1 you will throw rocks. This can be helpful if one of your teammates is currently fighting as it can distract the opponent. This is RB on Xbox. You can also punch other players in the waiting area using L2 and R2. This is LT and RT on Xbox. If you lose a life and win in the Gulag you respawn. Gameplay in the Gulag controls the same as it does for the rest of the game. Once the match starts it is a 1v1 last man standing. However, other players may throw rocks as a distraction or to injure you from the waiting area. In team modes if you have lost both your life and your chance to win in the Gulag, you can request a redeployment. You do this by pressing Up on the D-pad which will highlight the nearest Buy Station. Providing they have enough Cash, teammates can purchase your re-entry into the game and you will respawn. You then re-enter the game by parachutes. Driving the majority of vehicles such as quad bikes, jeeps and trucks all have similar controls, with R2 to Accelerate, L2 for Brake and Reverse and Left Stick for Steering. This is RT and LT on Xbox. The Right Stick can be used for looking around and pressing Cross allows you to swap seats. That’s A on Xbox. Holding Square for a moment will enable you to exit the vehicle. That’s X on Xbox. Helicopters control differently with R2 to Ascend, L2 to Descend, Left Stick for Steering and Right Stick to Aim the direction. This is RT and LT on Xbox. If you are a passenger of a vehicle with a teammate driving you can aim and shoot at opponents using the standard controls to do so. Many thanks for watching this video. For a more comprehensive look at Call of Duty: Warzone controls, please check out our Modern Warfare video. If there’s anything that we can do to help make gaming more accessible for you, then please do get in touch.

This Controls Walkthrough, which was filmed from home, takes a look at Call of Duty: Warzone Battle Royale mode (PEGI 18) and its gamepad controls and options.

This video covers:

A Gameplay Overview (1:47)
Tac Map Controls (5:10)
General Controls (5:54)
Gulag (and teammate respawn) Controls (9:43)
Vehicle Controls (11:22)

Also on this website is a previous written post on Warzone’s Battle Royale mode, and there’s also a previous video on Call of Duty: Modern Warfare that looks at options which are also available in Warzone’s Battle Royale mode.

Video by Cara Jessop

Music:
Kingdom Come by Theeves
Mornings by Jone Eksl (from artlist.io)

How to Remap Controls on Xbox One, PS4 or Nintendo Switch | How to…Video

Show Transcript

For many players, the ability to remap their controller can make a huge difference as to how accessible gaming is for them. On console, remapping is the ability to swap buttons, joysticks and triggers to make in-game actions easier to access. For instance, if someone is finding a particular button difficult to reach, press or hold, then being able to swap that button out for another can make the difference between being able to play a particular game or not. When built into the game itself, remapping can offer specific options to enable the player to customise how they play the game further. For example, allowing the player to create different mapping for different contexts, such as whether they are on foot or in a vehicle. This could mean that you have a specific custom control scheme for that particular game and for the different contexts within it. However, many games only feature partial remapping or do not feature any remapping at all.

When remapping options aren’t available in a particular game, the Xbox One, PS4 and Nintendo Switch all allow for remapping of inputs at a system level. So if a game that you wish to play does not allow you to create a layout that works for you, then it may be possible to create a layout at a system level. In this video we’re going to have a look at each of these and what you can map within them. System level remapping does have its limitations. For example, if you are using a PS4 controller and need to use Cross for Accelerate and Circle for Break or Reverse on a driving game, you can swap these inputs with the Triggers, which are often the default inputs for these actions. However, at a system level you won’t have just swapped the in-game controls, you will have swapped the full function of the buttons

meaning that you would now have to press R2 and L2 to control any menus. It is also worth noting that using system level remapping means that the game is unaware that you have remapped the controller, so any on-screen prompts will remain as standard. On all the consoles we’ll be looking at, system remapping is also only partial remapping, as unfortunately it’s not possible to map buttons onto joystick directions or joystick directions onto buttons currently. However, even with these limitations it’s worth noting that system level remapping can make a game more accessible for you if a game that you wish to play does not have its own remapping options. First of all, we’re going to have a look at system remapping on Xbox One. Go to your Apps and then open the Xbox Accessories App. From here you can choose to create a profile. You can name the profile if you like. You can create numerous profiles but there is only one Save Slot on a standard controller, so you will need to return to this screen to change the profile saved to the slot. When using the Xbox Adaptive Controller or an Elite Controller, you can save up to three profiles alongside the default one. From this screen you can see an image of a standard controller. You will notice that you are not able to remap the View, Menu or Xbox buttons and you cannot double up buttons. So it is not possible to have more than one button mapped to A, for example. You can select the button that you want to remap and then scroll down to select the button that you want to map it to. The functions of these two buttons will now be swapped. Remember, this is at a system level, not just for a particular game that you want to play. On the screen you can see all of the buttons that you have remapped. On Xbox, you are not able to remap the triggers to act as different buttons. You can only swap them. So, for example, you can make Left Trigger act as Right Trigger and vice versa but you cannot make Right Trigger act as A or make A act as Right Trigger. It is also possible to invert the Y axis on both analogue sticks from this menu. You are able to swap sticks which gives the Left Stick the Right Stick function and vice versa. However, you are unable to map to axis or individual joystick directions. For instance, you are not able to map the A button to the down direction on the Right stick or the other way around. Once you have finished you need to go back and set this new layout to Slot 1. To remap controls on the Nintendo Switch, first go to System Settings. Then go down to Controllers and Sensors and across to Change Button Mapping. Here you can map controls for Joy-Cons and also Pro Controllers. Remapping may also work for other controllers, providing the Switch picks it up as a Pro Controller. You are also able to remap the buttons on the Switch Lite Console. Go to Change and you can select which button you would like to remap. Note that it is possible to switch certain buttons off by selecting the button and choosing the Disable option. It’s also possible to change Stick Settings. For Joy-Cons and Pro Controllers you can swap sticks. If using a Joy-Con you can also change Orientation. So if you wish to hold the Joy-Con horizontally or vertically, you can change the stick Orientation to match this. You cannot remap or turn off the Home, Power, Volume or Sync buttons, but it is possible to have more than one button acting as the Home button, which could be helpful if there is another button that is easier for you to reach. Once you have created a layout that you are happy with, just go across and select Done. From here you can choose to make some more changes, reset the controller layout back to default, or save it as a preset. Before looking at saving as a preset we will have a quick look at remapping the Pro Controller. Just select your controller and go to Change. Now you can pick which buttons you wish to swap. You can also swap sticks. If you like, you can have two Left Sticks. For instance, if the position of each stick was better in different scenarios or for different types of in-game actions. However, again, you are unable to map to Axis or individual joystick directions. You can also double up other buttons such as by making almost every button act as A, which could be useful if the position of a particular input was more accessible in a particular scenario, or for a particular in-game action.

You do always need at least one button acting as A and one acting as B in order to be able to control System Menus. The Switch console won’t actually allow you to proceed with your configuration if you don’t have at least one button acting as A and one as B. You can save up to five different presets, so you could in theory have five different presets to cover different situations within one game, or five different presets for five different games. You will need to return to this screen to load one of your preset button mappings. To remap a PS4 controller, go to Settings and scroll down to Accessibility. Now scroll down to Custom Button Assignments. Now click Enable Custom Button Assignments. Go down and select Customise Button Assignments. From here you can see all of the buttons that you can swap. You will notice that it is only possible to swap buttons that are used for gameplay. So you cannot remap the PS button or Options or Share. You are also not able to remap the touchpad Click or remap the touchpad itself. It is not possible to double up buttons or turn buttons off. You can swap buttons over and can also make any button act as the triggers. So you could swap Cross and R2, for example. You can also swap joysticks. As with the other consoles you are unable to map to Axis or individual joystick directions. When you have finished, go to Confirm and select it. You can only create one profile and consequently will need to edit the Button Mapping screen each time you want to change your layout. You can’t save more than one profile. Another remapping option that we use at SpecialEffect is to use an adapter such as a Titan Two. An adapter could make it possible to remap your controller to a greater extent than most games or system level remapping allow. This can potentially enable you to overcome some of the problems caused by many games not featuring remapping options and also some of the limitations of system level remapping. You can also use different mapping profiles which could be switched between manually when in different contexts or games. For more information on this device, search the GameAccess site using the Titan Two tag. Many thanks for watching this video. If there’s anything that we can do to help make gaming more accessible for you, then please do get in touch.

 

For many of the players we work with, the ability to remap their controller can make a difference as to how accessible gaming is for them. Remapping is the ability to swap buttons, joysticks and triggers to make in-game actions easier to access, for instance if someone is finding a particular button difficult to reach, press or hold.

On console, this can sometimes be done in-game to when a developer has included this feature, but when this is not possible (or to compliment it) this can also now be done at system level, within the operating system of the console.

In this video, we demonstrate how to remap your controller on Xbox One, PS4 and Nintendo Switch and take a look at the remapping features each of these consoles has.

The start times for each section are:

Xbox One 2:28

Nintendo Switch 4:26

PlayStation 4 7:22

 

We hope that this video has been useful. If you have any questions, please visit the ‘Contact Us’ page.

 

Video by Cara Jessop

Music: The Lights (Instrumental) by A and TELLER Blue Race by Out of Flux (both from artlist.io)

Call of Duty: Warzone – Battle Royale Mode | Controls

Call of Duty: Warzone [PEGI 18] is a free to play Battle Royale game for PS4, Xbox One and PC. The game has up to 150 players fighting and surviving across a huge map, aiming to be the last player, or last team, standing. It can be downloaded via PlayStation Network, the Xbox store or Battle.net for PC.  It is cross-platform compatible, meaning that Xbox One players can play with PS4 and PC players for instance, with gamepads and mouse and keyboard available on all platforms. Matchmaking does divide gamepad and mouse and keyboard players, however.

The game can be played solo, or in a squad of up to four people with ‘Trio’ and ‘Quad’ squad matches. There is also a game mode called “Plunder” or “Blood Money” along with variations on the Battle Royale game mode. These modes may come and go as the game is updated.

In this blog post, we will be looking at the controls and options available for the standard Battle Royale mode, but many of the options will still apply to these other modes, but with some differences between the controls for each mode.

We will be looking at the following areas (click on the link to jump straight to the section):

Gameplay & Controls

Controller Options

Weapon Options

Movement Options

We will be focussing on the console versions of the game using a gamepad, having tested it on PS4 using a DualShock 4 controller. We will list the Xbox One control input followed by the PS4 control input e.g. A / Cross when describing which inputs control which actions.

When you first load Warzone, it may now load up with the “Bumper Ping” control scheme selected. In this blog post, we will discuss these controls but will be mainly focussing on the ‘Default’ control scheme, as many players will be more used to this control scheme from playing other Call of Duty game modes. It is possible to change control settings via the main menu and also by pausing the game. 

The game features several options for practicing, including some tutorial modes and a short practice match vs bots. These can be helpful for learning the basic gameplay mechanics and controls.

*Update 06/08/2020* Since this post was written, Joe has made an accompanying Controls Walkthrough video for Warzone’s Battle Royale mode, which was filmed from home. This video goes through:

A Gameplay Overview (1:47), Tac Map Controls (5:10), General Controls (5:54), Gulag (and teammate respawn) Controls (9:43) and Vehicle Controls (11:22).

 

Show Transcript

Call of Duty: Warzone is a free-to-play Battle Royale game for PS4, Xbox One and PC. The game has up to 150 players fighting and surviving across a huge map, trying to be the last player or last team standing. It can be downloaded via the PlayStation Network, Xbox Store or Battle.net for PC. The game is cross-platform compatible, meaning that players on Xbox One can play against those on PS4 and PC, with gamepad and mouse and keyboard available on all platforms. Matchmaking does divide mouse and keyboard and gamepad players, however. The game can be played Solo or in a squad of up to four people with Trio and Quad Squad Matches available. There’s also a game mode called Plunder or Blood Money, along with variations in the Battle Royale game mode. These modes may come and go as the game is updated. This video is to complement our previous video on Call of Duty: Modern Warfare, which looked at the full gameplay controls and options which are also applicable to Warzone. This video will focus on the additional controls required in Warzone: Battle Royale mode. The previous video, as well as a GameAccess post to go alongside the video, both go through all the controls in-game for reference. The features shown in our Modern Warfare video such as Toggle options, Sensitivity settings and other Interaction options still apply here. Please watch that video for more information on the controls and other options and settings available. We will be focusing on the console versions of the game. We have tested it on a PS4 using a DUALSHOCK 4 controller. We will also mention the Xbox One controls. When you first load Warzoneit may load with the Bumper Ping control scheme selected. In this video we’ll be mainly focusing on the Default control scheme, as many players will be more used to this control scheme from playing other Call of Duty game modes. It is possible to change control settings via the Main Menu and also by pausing the game. The game features several options for practising including some tutorial modes and a short practice match versus bots. These can be helpful for learning the basic gameplay mechanics and controls. The Warzone game modes available in the menu often change to accommodate temporary modes but the Battle Royale mode is a constant feature often offering Solo, Trio and Quad Squad options. At the menu you can pick to load up either a Solo, Trio or Quad Match. As standard, in team matches the game will autofill your team to make it three or four, depending on whether you choose Trios or Quads. If you don’t want your squad to fill with people outside invited friends, select Don’t Fill in the Squad Fill option. To either invite or join friends you press Triangle and select them if you have already added them and if they are online, or you can add friends. This would be Y on Xbox One. Whichever mode you choose the first thing to load up ahead of the match is a lobby, where you can practise shooting against other players waiting to play. Once enough players have joined, the main game will load. In Warzone up to 150 players compete on a map aiming to be the last player or last team standing. You start with nothing except a pistol and search buildings to collect Equipment and Cash. As the match goes on the map size decreases as gas draws in and surviving players must move towards the Safe Zone. All players have one life. If you lose this life you drop your weapon and you get one opportunity each match to win another respawn by entering the Gulag: a 1v1 last player standing match. If you lose in the Gulag or are killed again after visiting the Gulag once, teammates can still potentially buy you back. Squad mates can also revive the player if they have been downed but not killed. At the beginning of a match you and all other players will be in a plane which travels across a flight path across the map. This can be a good opportunity to look at your Tac Map. You can access the Tac Map by pressing the touchpad button on PS4. This is the View button on an Xbox controller. You will notice a white circle appear on the map. This is the Safe Zone which indicates the initial area the gas will next draw in on. You can Zoom in and out of areas on the map and can also Ping a location on the map. This can show other players in your team where you think would be best to land and can also act as a guide point if playing in Solo. Only you and players on your team can see your Ping Marker. Now we will look at the Tac Map controls. This is the Default layout controls for Tac Map. Left Stick will continue to move your character in-game whilst the map is open. Right Stick moves the cursor around the Tac Map. Hold R1 to Zoom In, RB on Xbox. Hold L1 to Zoom Out. LB on Xbox. Up on D-pad to Ping. This creates a marker that both you and teammates can see. R3 is to delete the Ping. This is Right Stick Click on Xbox. L3 is used to move the cursor to player icon. This is the Left Stick Click on Xbox. If you press the touchpad or View button again you will close the map. Pressing Cross, or A, will cause you to jump out of the plane and you immediately start free-falling. Use the Left Analogue Stick to move in the air and the Right Stick to Look or Aim. Cross, or A, will open your parachute which you can do at any time. In the in-game settings there is the option to have Parachute Auto-Deploy, either enabled or disabled. If you choose to have it enabled then your parachute will automatically open once you get close to the ground. If you have this option disabled you will need to press Cross to open your parachute manually. This is A on Xbox. If you do not do this you will crash land and either need a teammate to revive you or you will lose your first life when playing in a Solo Match. When parachuting you can press Circle to cut your parachute and return to free-falling. B on Xbox. Note that even with Parachute Auto-Deploy enabled you will need to manually open the parachute the second time around as it will not auto-deploy twice. You can also hold L1 to Free Look in third person. This is LB on Xbox. Once you have landed you will have a pistol but no other equipment. You will need to gather equipment and although you may find some items on the floor it is worth listening out for the sound generated by crates. Crates may have a variety of objects in them including Weapons, Killstreaks, Ammunition and Cash, but rival players will be able to hear them and will be looking for them also. The Reload button is Square which also acts as Interacts. There are several ways in which you might use this button. This is X on Xbox. For example, to open crates you need to briefly hold the Interact button, for approximately half a second. This also includes opening Buy Stations from which you can purchase an extra life for a teammate, Killstreaks or some equipment. Once you have opened a crate, if you decide to pick up a weapon or Killstreak you need to hold the button down for around half a second again to pick up each item. Ammunition and Armor can be picked up simply by walking over them. You don’t need to press a button to do this although you can use the Interact button if not directly over something. You will also need to use Square, holding it for approximately half a second to pick up tactical and lethal items, Killstreaks, perks and to swap weapons. To open a crate you need to hold the Interact button for around half a second. If you need to revive a teammate you need to hold the button for around five seconds. You can also drop equipment. In-team based modes this can be to share with teammates or to make space to allow you to carry other items. To open the menu hold Down on the D-pad and use a Right Analogue Stick to cycle across to the item you want to drop. If you are dropping something you have in multiples, such as Ammo, you can press the Triangle button to drop some, or press the Square button to drop it all. This is Y and X on Xbox. Although you can usually just walk over Ammo to pick it up, to pick up anything that you have dropped back up, you will need to press the Square button. This is X on Xbox. To put on an Armor Plate hold the Triangle button for around half a second. This is Y on Xbox. Although when you see Armor the game tells you to hold Square to pick it up, you will also automatically pick it up by running or walking over it. If you lose your first life within the game, rather than it being game over you get one chance to win your way back into the game. The Gulag is a 1v1 match which you must win to continue playing. If you are playing a Solo Match the Gulag is literally your last chance to keep playing. In the team modes, however, if you lose you can spectate your team and if they collect enough in-game currency then they can buy you back into the game. Once in the Gulag you usually start in a waiting area where you can watch other players fight whilst waiting for your turn. If you press R1 you will throw rocks. This can be helpful if one of your teammates is currently fighting as it can distract the opponent. This is RB on Xbox. You can also punch other players in the waiting area using L2 and R2. This is LT and RT on Xbox. If you lose a life and win in the Gulag you respawn. Gameplay in the Gulag controls the same as it does for the rest of the game. Once the match starts it is a 1v1 last man standing. However, other players may throw rocks as a distraction or to injure you from the waiting area. In team modes if you have lost both your life and your chance to win in the Gulag, you can request a redeployment. You do this by pressing Up on the D-pad which will highlight the nearest Buy Station. Providing they have enough Cash, teammates can purchase your re-entry into the game and you will respawn. You then re-enter the game by parachutes. Driving the majority of vehicles such as quad bikes, jeeps and trucks all have similar controls, with R2 to Accelerate, L2 for Brake and Reverse and Left Stick for Steering. This is RT and LT on Xbox. The Right Stick can be used for looking around and pressing Cross allows you to swap seats. That’s A on Xbox. Holding Square for a moment will enable you to exit the vehicle. That’s X on Xbox. Helicopters control differently with R2 to Ascend, L2 to Descend, Left Stick for Steering and Right Stick to Aim the direction. This is RT and LT on Xbox. If you are a passenger of a vehicle with a teammate driving you can aim and shoot at opponents using the standard controls to do so. Many thanks for watching this video. For a more comprehensive look at Call of Duty: Warzone controls, please check out our Modern Warfare video. If there’s anything that we can do to help make gaming more accessible for you, then please do get in touch.

 

Gameplay & Controls

A screen shot of the Warzone menu screen. From here you can invite friends, and choose which game mode you would like to play. You can also go to options from this screen.
The Warzone game modes available in the menu often change to accommodate temporary modes, but the Battle Royale mode is a constant feature often offering Solo, Trio and Quad squad options

At the menu, you can pick to load up either a Solo, Trio or Quad match. As standard, in team matches the game will auto fill your team to make it three or four, depending on whether you chose Trios or Quads. If you are playing with one friend, and do not wish for the third place in the team to be filled in Trios by someone you do not know, you can switch the auto fill option off. The same could be done for Quads for the fourth spot in your squad, if you preferred to play that mode as a three.

To either invite or join friends, you press Y (Xbox One)/Triangle (PS4) and select them if you have already added them and if they are online, or add them.

Whichever mode you choose, the first thing to load up ahead of the match is a lobby with a deathmatch style warm up, where you can practice shooting against other players waiting to play. Once enough players have joined, the main game will load.

 In Warzone, up to 150 players compete on a map, aiming to be the last player, or team, standing. You start with nothing except a pistol and search buildings to collect equipment and cash. As the match goes on, the map size decreases as gas draws in and surviving players must move towards the safe zone. All players have one life. If you lose this life, you drop your weapons and you get one opportunity each match to win another respawn by entering the ‘Gulag’, a 1V1 last player standing match. You can also be bought back by surviving teammates, if they have collected enough in-game cash. If you lose in the Gulag, team mates can still potentially buy you back. Squad mates can also revive a player if they have been downed, but not killed.

At the beginning of a match, you and all other players will be in a plane which travels across a flight path across the map.

A screen shot of the plane in Warzone. Each player will sky dive from the plane, and can choose where they would like to land.
Players arrive at the map in a plane from which they skydive

This can be a good opportunity to look at your Tactical, or ‘Tac’ map. You can access the Tac map by pressing the view button on an Xbox controller, or by clicking the touchpad on PS4. You will notice a white circle appear on the map; this is the safe zone, which indicates the initial area the gas will next draw in on.  You can zoom in and out of areas on the map, and can also Ping a location on the map. This can show other players in your team where you think would be best to land and can also act as a guide point if playing in Solo. Only you and players on your team can see your Ping marker.

Tac Map Controls

‘Default Layout’ Tac Map Controls:

Left stick will continue to move your character in-game, whilst the map is open.

Right stick moves the cursor around the Tac map

Hold RB/R1 to zoom in.

Hold LB/L1 to zoom out

Up on D-pad to ping. This creates a marker that both you and team mates can see.

Right Stick Click/R3 to delete ping.

Left Stick Click/L3 to move cursor to player icon.

A screenshot of the Tac Map when using the Default Controller Layout.
Tac Map control prompts when using the ‘Default’ Controller Layout

‘Bumper Ping’ Layout Tac Map Controls:

If using the Bumper ping control scheme, the Tac mac controls are as follows.

Left stick will continue to move your character in game.

Right stick moves the cursor around the Tac map

Hold Y/Triangle to zoom in.

Hold B/Circle to zoom out.

LB/L1 to ping. This creates a marker that both you and team mates can see.

Right Stick Click/R3 to delete ping.

Left Stick Click/L3 to move cursor to player icon.

A screen shot of the Tac Map when using the Bumper Ping Controller Layout.
Tac Map control prompts when using the ‘Bumper Ping’ Controller Layout

If you press the View button/Touchpad again, you will close the map. Pressing A / Cross will cause you to jump out of the plane, and you will immediately start freefalling. Use the left analog stick to move in the air, and the right stick to look/aim. A / Cross will open your parachute, which you can do at any time.

In the in-game settings, there is the option to have “Parachute Auto Deploy” either enabled or disabled. If you choose to have it enabled, then your parachute will automatically open once you get close to the ground. If you have this option disabled, you will need to press A / Cross to open your parachute manually; if you do not do this, you will crash land and will either need a team mate to revive you, or you will lose your first life in solos. When parachuting, you can press B / Circle to cut your parachute and return to freefalling. Note that even with Parachute auto deploy enabled, you will need to manually open the parachute the second time around, as it will not auto deploy twice. You can also hold LB / L1 to freelook in 3rd person.

Once you have landed, you will have a pistol but no other equipment.

A screenshot of Warzone during gameplay. All players will start with a pistol, and need to find other weapons.

You will need to gather equipment, and although you may find items on the floor, it is worth listening out for the sound generated by crates. Crates may have a variety of objects in them, including weapons, killstreaks, ammunition and cash – but other players will be looking for them too.

In this blog post we will focus on the ‘Default’ and ‘Bumper Ping’ control schemes, but there are other schemes to choose from as well. These are all displayed in the gallery below. You can scroll through the 13 different layouts using the arrows:

There are also six stick layout presets. You can scroll through the 13 different layouts in the gallery below using the arrows:

Looking in the Options menu you’ll see that there are multiple options, and also controller layouts, that might be helpful for you. The game does not allow you to create your own controller layout.  You could use the PlayStation 4 Accessibility Options or the Xbox One Ease of Access options to allow you to do this, but this does not allow you to map by context.

If using mouse and keyboard you are able to remap individual actions and also some menu options within the game itself. Here we will be continuing to focus on the controller options.

On Foot Controls (‘Default’ and ‘Bumper Ping’ Layouts)

Below we will look at the controls in a bit more detail:

  • Left Stick is used for player movement.
  • You then use the Right Stick to aim/look.
  • To aim down sights you hold LT / L2.
  • To shoot you press/hold RT / R2.
  • When prompted you can press X / Square to reload, but you can also reload any time once you’ve fired. If you are aiming down sights, you can still reload.
  • To swap weapons press Y / Triangle
  • To crouch you press B / Circle. Press the button again to stand back up.
  • To go prone you hold B / Circle for a little longer. Press the button again to stand back up.
  • Press A / Cross to jump.
  • Left on the D-pad will change the firing mode. On some automatic weapons, tapping left on the D-pad will change the firing mode to a single shot. If you tap the button again to automatic, you can now fire as many rounds as you like.
  • Using ‘Default’ controls, Up on the D-pad is to If you are using ‘Bumper Ping’ controls, then LB / L1 is ping. You can Ping anywhere to show team mates a location as a reference point, and you can also Ping items such as crates, weapons or vehicles to highlight them for teammates by directly aiming/looking at them whist pressing the ping input. This can be a helpful way to communicate, especially if you are not using a headset to chat with other players. If you see an enemy, you can double tap the button to mark them or a location near them.
  • In the game you also have tactical equipment, including flash or smoke grenades and when using default controls you use these by pressing either LB / L1. If you hold the button down you’ll cook the grenade before throwing it, or you can just tap it to throw straight away.
  • RB / R1 is for lethal equipment, such as a hand grenade, which can also be thrown (tap) or cooked before throwing (hold and release when ready). If you are using the ‘Bumper Ping’ control scheme, it’s a bit different, as instead, RB / R1 will control both tactical and lethal equipment; to swap between the two, press Up on the D-pad.
  • Whilst moving forwards with the left stick you can press Left Stick Click and you’ll start sprinting. If you double tap the button, you will do a short, fast, tactical sprint.
  • If you then press B / Circle when sprinting, you’ll do a slide.
  • If you click the Right stick click / R3 you’ll do a Melee; it’s worth noting that in this Call of Duty sometimes you’ll need to do more than one Melee to get the kill.
  • Right on the D-pad lets you select a Killstreak that you may have collected.
  • In Modern Warfare you can mount walls and other objects that you can also be partly be hidden behind, which can give you some cover. Holding down LT / L2 to aim and then use Right Stick Click to wall mount.  To move away, just let go of Left trigger/L2 and move away from the wall using left stick.
  • The reload button is X / Square, which also acts as the interact There are several ways in which you might use this button. For example, to open crates you need to briefly hold the interact button (X / Square), for approximately half a second. This also includes opening Buy Stations, from which you can purchase an extra life for a teammate, killstreaks or some equipment. Once you have opened a crate, if you decide to pick up a weapon, or killstreak, you need to hold the button down for around half a second again to pick up each item. Ammunition and armour can be picked up simply by walking over them, you don’t need to press a button for this, though you can use X / Square if not directly over something. You will also need to use X / Square (a hold of approx. half a second) to pick up tactical and lethal items, killstreaks, perks and to swap weapons.
Screen shot of Warzone during gameplay, demonstrating how to open a Supply Box.
To open a crate, you need to hold X / Square for around half a second.
Screen shot of Call of Duty: Warzone demonstarting how to revive team mates.
If you need to revive a teammate, you need to hold X / Square for around five seconds.
  • You can also drop equipment. In team based modes, this can be to share with team mates, or to make space to allow you to carry other items. To open the menu, hold Down on the D-pad, and use the Right analogue stick to cycle across to the item you want to drop. If you are dropping something you have in multiples, such as ammo, you can press Y / Triangle to drop some, or press X / Square to drop it all. Although you can usually just walk over ammo to pick it up, to pick anything you have dropped back up, you will need to press X / Square.
  • To put on armour plate, hold Y / Triangle for around half a second. Although when you see armour, the game tells you to hold square to pick it up, you will also automatically pick it up by walking or running over it.

Gulag Controls

If you lose your first life within the game, rather than it being game over, you get one chance to win your way back into the game. The Gulag is a 1v1 match, which you must win to continue playing. If you are playing a solo match, the Gulag is literally your last chance to keep playing. In the team mode, however, if you lose you can spectate your team, and if they collect enough in game currency, they can then buy you back into the game. Once in the Gulag, you will usually start in a waiting area, where you can watch other players fight, whilst waiting for your turn. If you press RB / R1, you will throw rocks; this can be helpful if one of your teammates is currently fighting, as it can distract the opponent. You can also punch other players in the waiting area, using LT / L2, and RT / R2. If you lose a life, and win in the Gulag, you respawn. Gameplay in the Gulag controls the same as it does for the rest of the game.  

Screen shot of Call of Duty: Warzone showing the waiting area of the Gulag.
Once the match starts, is it 1v1 last man standing. However, other players may throw rocks as a distraction or to injure you from the waiting area.
Screen shot of Call of Duty: Warzone showing gameplay in the Gulag.

Redeployment Controls

In team modes, if you have lost both your life and your chance in the Gulag, you can request redeployment. You do this by pressing Up on the D-pad, which will highlight the nearest Buy Station. Providing they have enough cash, they can purchase your re-entry into the game and you will respawn by parachute.  

Screen shot of Call of Duty: Warzone demoonstarting the prompt to Request Redeployment.
Up on the D-pad requests redeployment from your teammates

Vehicle Controls

Driving the majority of vehicles, such as quadbikes, jeeps and trucks all have similar controls, with RT / R2 to accelerate, LT / L2 for brake and reverse, and left stick for steering. The right stick can be used for looking around, and pressing A / Cross allows you to swap seats.  Holding X / Square for a moment will enable you to exit the vehicle. Helicopters control differently, with RT / R2 held to ascend, LT / L2 to descend, left stick for steering and right stick for aiming the nose.

If you are a passenger of a vehicle, which a teammate driving, you can aim and shoot at opponents, using the standard controls to do so.

Controller Options

Screen shot of Warzone showing the Controller Options.
Controller Options include controller layout and stick options

We previously covered the Controller Options in our post on Modern Warfare and these options are also available in Warzone. As well as the controller layouts and stick layout presets mentioned earlier in this post, these also include:

Invert Vertical Look – It is possible to invert the vertical look and there are three options available. It’s automatically set to disabled, and there’s also an option for air planes only, which means that the camera movement on the vertical axis will be inverted when you’re in an aircraft. The third option is to set it to enabled, which means that the vertical axis will always be inverted. So when moving the right analogue stick up, you will look down and vice versa.

Sensitivity – If you find that when you’re aiming you’re moving either too slowly or too quickly, then you can try changing the sensitivity options to see if this helps. The options are for: Horizontal Stick Sensitivity, Vertical Stick Sensitivity and also two options for Aim Down Sight Sensitivity. In the Aim Down Sights settings, The Low Zoom option is for when looking down the sights of a standard gun and the High Zoom option is for when looking down a scope that is zoomed in, such as with a sniper rifle.

Aim Response Curve Type – By changing the Response Curve Type, it’s possible to make the action more or less sensitive at different points on moving the joystick. For example, Linear will respond directly to the amount you move the joystick while Standard will accelerate towards the amount you have moved the joystick.

Weapon Options

Screenshot of Warzone showing ther Weapon Options.
Weapons Options allow players to choose how they interact with certain weapon actions in-game

As with the Controller Options, we covered the Weapon Options in our post on Modern Warfare and these options remain available in Warzone. These are:

Aim Assist Type – There are four different types of aim assists and these apply to both online, multi-player and also campaign modes. The Standard Aim Assist is on by default and essentially slows down your aiming once you’re near to a target. Precision means that there is a stronger aim slowdown but this will only kick in when you’re very close to a target; the developer suggests that this is best for players who are very accurate. The focusing option might be worth having a look at if you’re new to this type of game or new to analogue aiming , as the slowdown kicks in even when you’re missing the target.  You can also disable Aim Assist which turns Aim Assist off entirely.

Weapon Mount Activation – Changing this may be helpful if you find that holding down LT / L2, and pressing Right Stick Click /  R3 is difficult to do at the same time. You can disable Weapon Mounting entirely if you’d rather not use it. You can also map it to Double Tap Aim Down Sights, which means that you would double tap LT / L2, and if you’re near to an object then you would mount it. You can also map it to Aim Down Sights only. This means that if you’re near to something that you can mount you just have to press the LT / L2, and you will automatically weapon mount.

Weapon Mount Movement Exit – You can either have it set so that you let go of LT / L2  to exit Weapon Mounting, or you can have it set so that you just have to move the Left Stick in a direction away from the object that you’ve mounted.

Aim Down Sight Behaviour – There is the option to toggle aim down sights, so if holding down LT / L2 is difficult then you can have it set to toggle. This means you just have to tap the button, and it will aim down sights until you press it again.  

Equipment Behaviour – As standard to throw equipment you either tap LB or RB, or L1 or R1, depending on which controller you are using. To cook it before throwing it currently you have to hold the button down and then let go when you are ready. If holding that button down is difficult you can change it to toggle, meaning that to cook the grenade before throwing you would just tap the button to start cooking, and then tap again to throw it.

Use/Reload Behaviour – As the Reload and Use Item button is the same there are a few options that can help make it easier. The first option is tap to reload and hold to use. As standard, tapping X / Square would reload the gun and then hold the button down down to use objects/open doors. As a second option, It is possible to swap this over so you could map it to Tap to use and Hold to reload. The third option is Contextual Tap: this means that you only ever have to tap the button, so if you’re away from an object and press the button it will act as reload. If you are near to an object that you can use, like opening a door, it will always prioritise using that item over reloading. With this option on you can also hold the button to reload, so if you are near a door but need to reload, you still have the option to prioritise this.

If holding down buttons is difficult then setting Aim Down Sight Behaviour to Toggle, Equipment Behaviour to Toggle, and Use/Reload Behaviour to Contextual could be helpful. There currently isn’t an option to help with shooting, which will require either multiple taps or button holding, depending on the weapon that you’re using and the situation that you’re in.

Depleted Ammo Weapon Switch – By default when you run out of ammo in one weapon the game will automatically swap to your other weapon. You can have this off if you prefer, which means that when you run out of ammo you’ll still keep hold of that gun, and to swap you would have to press Y /Triangle.

Movement Options

Screen shot of Warzone showing the Movement Options.

As well as Parachute auto deploy, which we covered earlier, there are also several other movement options that might be helpful. As with the Controller and Weapons Options listed above, the Movement Options were originally covered in our post on Modern Warfare and can also be applied in Warzone. These include:

Slide Behaviour – It is possible to change Slide Behaviour, so as standard in order to slide you would be sprinting, and then would have to hold down B / Circle in order to slide. You could map this so that instead you just have to tap B / Circle in order to slide whilst sprinting.

Auto Move Forward – As standard, to walk forwards you press up on the Left Stick and have to keep that held to keep moving. You can also enable the option for auto walking forwards, doing this means if you move the Left Stick forwards very quickly twice, you will walk automatically. To stop walking, you would then need to pull the stick backwards.

Automatic Sprint – There are also some options for automatic sprinting. This means that when you push the Left Stick forwards, you start sprinting straight away, so there’s no need to click the stick in. You can also have the control set to Automatic Tactical Sprints, which means that if you push the Left Stick forward you go straight to a tactical sprint. You can only ever tactical sprint for a limited time, so once this runs out you’ll then go into a normal sprint.

We hope that this post was useful in explaining the controls and options available in Call of Duty: Warzone’s Battle Royale mode. More posts on Call of Duty can be found on the SpecialEffect Games Access site.

If you have any questions, please visit the ‘Contact Us’ page.

Moving Out | Controls

Moving Out [PEGI 3] is a game described by the developer as a “ridiculous physics-based moving simulator”, that can be played both solo and two-player. The aim is to get the items out of the home and into the removal van within the time limit. Each stage also has extra challenges, which may include, for example, trying to move without breaking certain items, or by making sure the family pets are on the van before leaving!

In this post we will be focussing on the gamepad controls for the console versions of the game, which appear on PS4, Xbox One and Nintendo Switch. It is also available on PC and the inputs below apply when using a gamepad. We will be looking at the controls used to play and also the options avaible in ‘Assist Mode’.

*Update 22/06/20* Since this post was written, Joe has made a Controls Walkthrough video, which was filmed from home. This can be found at the bottom of this post.

Controls

Screenshot showing Default Layout

The ‘Default’ layout controls are:

Left Stick for Player Movement.

X (Playstation 4)/A (Xbox One)/B (Nintendo Switch) for Jump.

Square/X/Y to Throw an item you are carrying, or Slap if you aren’t currently carrying an item. To Throw, by default you hold onto the button, aim with Left Stick and then let go of the button to Throw the item.

L2/LT/ZL or R2/RT/ZR are used to Grab items. This is how you pick up any household goods that need to go into the van. As standard, you need to hold the button for the duration that you wish to hold the item.

Triangle/Y/X is used to get Hints to appear on screen. This will show you which items you need to put into the van, as not everything in the house needs to be packed up. By default, if you are playing co-operatively with another player, pressing the Hint button will also show how many people you need to move that item.  

For all consoles, each of the four D-pad directional buttons will control a different emote. 

Once you have completed the first mission, you go to the world map, where jobs are highlighted. You navigate this map by Driving the van, which you do with the Left Stick. Press X/A/B to select the job you would like to do.

Control Options

There are also three other control layouts to choose from, including a left handed mode and a right handed mode, which move the majority of controls over to the relevant side of the controller. You can pick your controller layout by pausing the game (Options/Menu/+ buttons) and going to Settings and then Controls. Click on the arrows below, to see the different controller layouts:

You can also choose two toggle options, for Grab and Throw. You can choose to have either, or both, of these set to either Hold or Toggle. Toggle Grab means that you must tap the button once to grab onto the item, and tap it again to let go.  Toggle Throw means that you tap the button once to start the throwing process, which means you can aim without having to hold. Tap the button again to Throw.

The PC version of the game features remappable keyboard controls. However, there is not the option to remap a controller on console. You can use the accessibility settings on your console to remap your controller on PS4, Xbox One and Nintendo Switch, but this will not be contextual, and any on-screen prompts will not change to the setup that you have created.

Gameplay Options

A screenshot of the Moving Out Assist Mode options.

Assist Mode features a variety of options that you use to aid gameplay. You can start with Assist Mode switched on at the very beginning of the game. If you start with it off, but wish to switch it on at any point, you will have to quit to the Main Menu. You can then switch Assist Mode on and continue your game; you will lose progress for the specific level if you quit part way through, but you don’t have to restart the entire game. You can simply go back to the level you quit on, and start it again with Assist Mode enabled.

Once Assist Mode is enabled, you can choose which assists you want on. If you decide half way through a level that you would like to switch certain assists on/off, you will have to restart that particular level.

Long Time Limits – each job has a time limit. However, by switching this option on, you will get a longer time period.

Objects Disappear on Delivery – as standard, when you put items into the van, the item will stay in the place that you put it. When stacking other items around it, the van becomes quite full, and items can also fall out of the van. This means it can take up more time trying to put them back in, and trying to rearrange the van to fit everything in. If this becomes difficult, you can choose to make Objects Disappear on Delivery; this means that once you put the item into the van, it will vanish, meaning you have plenty of space for the rest of the delivery as well. Items will not fall back out of the van once you have this option on.

The pictures below show a van starting to fill up, with the Objects Disappear on Delivery option switched off, and also the van with the same number of items load onto it, but with the option switched on.

A screen shot of Moving Out with Objects disappear on delivery switched off.
Objects Disappear on Delivery option switched Off
A screen shot of Moving Out with Objects disappear on delivery switched on.
Objects Disappear on Delivery option switched On

Reduced Difficulty – this option removes any dangers within the level, and also removes any slow down elements. An example would be that it removes traps that can be scattered around the level to slow you down.

Skip Level on Fail – if you don’t manage to successfully complete a particular level, and would rather not keep trying, you can choose to skip the level entirely.

Lighter 2P Items – when playing in two-player, bigger items such as beds and sofas are heavier to lift, and will require two people to move them. This is not the case in solo, where you can lift each item on your own. Selecting this option means that objects are also light enough for one person to move them in two-player also.

*Update 22/06/20* Since this post was written, Joe has made a Controls Walkthrough video, which was filmed from home:

Show Transcript

Here at SpecialEffect we’re always looking for games that have accessibility features that help with controlling the game.

Moving out has an Assist Mode which has several options which could potentially

make the game more accessible for many players and in this video we’re going to have a look at these.

The game is described by the developer as a “ridiculous physics-based moving simulator” and it can be played both solo and two-player.

The aim is to get the items out of the home and into the removal van within the time limit

and there are also some optional objectives that you can choose to complete.

Moving Out is available for PC, Nintendo Switch, Xbox One and PS4 and in this video we’ll be focusing on the console versions of the game.

We will be looking at the PS4 version of the game but the controls use corresponding buttons

for all consoles when using a gamepad.

First of all, let’s have a look at the default controls.

On all consoles Left Stick is for Play and Movement.

Cross is for Jump. That’s A on Xbox, B on Nintendo Switch.

L2 or R2 are used to Grab items. This is how you pick up any household goods that need to go into the van.

As standard you need to hold the button for the duration that you wish to hold the item. That would be Left Trigger or Right Trigger on Xbox One, ZL or ZR on Nintendo Switch.

Square is to Throw an item you are carrying or Slap if you aren’t currently carrying an item.

To Throw, by default, you hold onto the button aim with the Left Stick and then let go of the button to Throw the item. That would be X on Xbox and Y on Nintendo Switch.

Triangle is used to get Hints to appear on the screen. This will show you which items

you need to put into the van as not everything in the house needs to be packed up.

By default if you are playing cooperatively with another player pressing the Hint button will also show how many people you need to move that item. That would be Y on Xbox, X on Nintendo Switch.

For all consoles each of the four D-pad directional buttons will control a different emote

Once you have completed the first mission you go to the World Map where jobs are highlighted.

You navigate this map by driving the van which we do with the Left Stick. Press Cross to select the job that you would like to do. That’s A on Xbox, A on Nintendo Switch.

You can pick your Controller Layout by pausing the game and going to Settings and then Controls.

There are three other Control Layouts to choose from including a Left-Handed Mode and a Right-Handed Mode which move the majority of controls over to the relevant side of the controller.

You can also choose two Toggle options for Grab and Throw. You can choose to have either or both of these sets either Hold or Toggle. Toggle Grab means that you must tap the button once to grab onto the item, tap it again to let go. Toggle Throw means that you tap the button once to start the throwing process which means you can aim without having to hold. Tap the button again to throw.

The PC version of the game features remappable keyboard controls. However, there is not the option to remap a controller on console.

You can use the Accessibility Settings on your console to remap your controller on PS4, Xbox One and Nintendo Switch. But this will not be contextual and any on-screen prompts will not change in line with the layout that you have created.

Assist Mode features a variety of options that you use to aid gameplay.

You can start with Assist Mode switched on or off at the very beginning of the game. If you start with it off but wish to switch it on at any point you will have to quit to the Main Menu. You can then switch Assist Mode on and continue your game. You will lose progress for the specific level if you quit part way through but you don’t have to restart the entire game. You can simply go back to the level you quit on and start it again with Assist Mode enabled.

Once Assist Mode is enabled you can choose which assists you want on. If you decide half way through a level that you would like to switch certain assists on or off you will have to restart that particular level. 

Here are all of the included assists.

Long Time Limits: Each job has a time limit. However, by switching this option on

you will get a longer time period.

Objects Disappear on Delivery: as standard, when you put items into the van the item will stay in the place that you put it. When stacking other items around it the van becomes quite full and items can also fall out of the van. This means it can take up more time trying to out them back in and trying to rearrange the van to fit everything in.

If stacking the van becomes difficult you can choose to make Objects Disappear on Delivery.

This means that once you have put the item into the van it will vanish meaning that you have plenty of space for the rest of the delivery as well. Items will not fall back out of the van once you have this option on.

Reduced Difficulty: this option removes any dangers within the level and also reduces any slow-down elements. An example would be that it removes traps that can be scattered around the level to slow you down and also there’ll be less traffic if you need to cross the road.

Enemies will also be slower when chasing you and will stay stunned for longer after you have slapped them.

Skip Level on Fail: if you don’t manage to successfully complete a particular level and would rather not keep trying you can choose to skip the level entirely.

Lighter Two-Player Items: when playing in two-player bigger items such as beds and sofas

are heavier to lift and will require two people to move them. This is not the case in solo

where you can lift each item on your own. Selecting this option means that objects are also light enough for one person to move them when playing in Two-Player Mode also.

Many thanks for watching this video.

If there’s anything that we can do to help with making gaming more accessible

then please do get in touch.

Video by Cara Jessop

Music: ‘I Am Not Electro’ & ‘Together We Are’ by DANSHA ‘Hidden Cam’ by Young Rich Pixies

More posts on accessibility features in games can be found in our site using the Accessibility Feature tag.

If you have any questions, please visit the ‘Contact Us’ page.

How to Remap Your Controls on Nintendo Switch

Screesnhot showing the Nintendo Switch Button Mapping interface in the system menu.
Photo showing a pair of Nintendo Switch Joy Con's being held in a Joy Con grip next to a Switch console.

Nintendo have added button remapping as part of their 10.0.0 system update. This is remapping at a system level, meaning that swapping buttons around will affect in-game button presses and also how you control game menus and the Nintendo system menu. For instance, you could swap controls such as A and B around, if you would prefer to use the buttons this way, or you could map the letter buttons over to the D-pad, if that makes things easier for you. In addition to button remapping, you can also swap the joystick functions over, but not map to individual directions or axis’.

Remapping this way at a system level, in a similar way to how you can remap on PS4 and Xbox One, means that any remapped inputs are not shown onscreen in-game as button or joystick prompts. For instance, if you swapped the A and B buttons over you would need to remember that when a game says to press ‘A’ onscreen to do an action, you would press B yourself. This type of remapping also does not allow for contextual mappings in-game, such as choosing an input to use for a particular action in a certain context. Contextual remapping requires a developer to add this option into the game itself. However, system remapping can still be used to customise controls, which may make it easier for some players to access their console.

Please note that Nintendo state that button remapping will only work for Joy Cons, the Switch Pro Controller and the Switch Lite. It may not be possible therefore to use the remapping options if you are using a third-party controller, even if it is licensed by Nintendo.

You can also disable the majority of buttons on the controller. Please also note that you cannot remap, or disable, the Home, Power, Volume or Sync buttons.  In this blog post we will focus on the buttons used for gameplay.

Below, we will break down the steps, explaining how you can remap the buttons and analog sticks on a Nintendo Switch controller.

To try remapping buttons, first go to System Settings:

Nintendo Switch system menu screenshot showing Systems Settings being selected.

Now scroll down to Controllers and Sensors and go across to select Change Button Mapping:

Nintendo Switch system menu screenshot showing Change Button Mappings being selected.

Within Change Button Mapping, select Change:

Nintendo Switch system menu screenshot showing Change being selected in Button Mapping.

Within this menu you can see the current controller configuration. Click on the button that you would like to swap, to open up the next part of the menu:

Nintendo Switch system menu screenshot showing a ZR button being selected in the Change Button Mapping settings.

If you scroll down, you can also swap the joysticks over. You can make left stick act as right, or vice versa. You can also make both sticks act as the same stick – so essentially you could have two left sticks, if you like:

Nintendo Switch system menu screenshot showing a Change to Left Stick  being selected for the Right Stick in the Change Button Mapping settings.

After deciding on your stick configuration, you can also swap buttons around. After clicking on the button that you want to swap, you can now see the options as to what you would like to swap the button to. You can also disable any button that you might use for gameplay. This means if you accidentally press a particular button, you can potentially switch it off:

Nintendo Switch system menu screenshot showing the buttons available to be mapped to the A Button input in the Change Button Mapping settings.

Once you have selected the button you would like to swap, you go back to the previous screen, where you can see what you have swapped around. Click Done if you are happy with your selections at this stage:

Nintendo Switch system menu screenshot showing Done being selected in the Change Button Mapping settings.

Although you cannot remap the Home button,  you can also make another button also act as the home button, if you prefer. You can also double up other buttons, such as by making almost every button act as A. You do always need at least one button acting as A and one acting as B, in order to be able to control system menus the Switch won’t actually allow you to proceed with your configuration if you don’t have at least one button acting as A and one as B,  as shown in the picture  below:

Nintendo Switch system menu screenshot showing a message that A and B must each be mapped to a button to proceed in the Change Button Mapping settings.

If you are using a Joy Con, you can also choose to display your preset either vertically or horizontally:

Nintendo Switch system menu screenshot showing an option to display the controller vertically in the Change Button Mapping settings.

Once you have created a configuration that you are happy with, select Done. The Switch will give you the following advice:

Nintendo Switch system menu screenshot showing a message that the mapping has been changed in the Change Button Mapping settings.

You will now go back to the previous screen and can choose to Save as a Preset:

Nintendo Switch system menu screenshot showing an option to Save as a Preset.

Now you just need to select a slot to save your Preset to: :

Nintendo Switch system menu screenshot showing a message to select a slot to save to.

You can have up to five different Presets, so if different games require different configurations, or if particular parts of a game require different controls, you can go back to the menu and swap to another Preset.

More posts on accessibility to the Nintendo Switch can be found on the blog: https://gameaccess.info/?fwp_categories=nintendo-switch 

If you have any questions, please visit the ‘Contact Us’ page.

Using Switches to Access Button Presses

Show Transcript

Many of the people that we work with find that certain buttons on either standard console controllers or mouse and keyboard can be difficult to either reach or press. If this is the case then there can be other ways that you can potentially activate button presses. It may be that mounting a controller in a particular way might make it easier for you to access all of the buttons. Another way that can be helpful is to use external accessibility switches as these can be positioned anywhere that you can comfortably and repeatedly press them. For example some people find that having switches mounted by their head might be helpful. Or potentially having one on the floor by their feet. Switches can be used for a variety of things such as for button presses or emulating joystick movement such as Walk Forwards button for first-person games. The type of switch that might work for you will depend on the physical movement and strength that you have and also where you’re planning to position it. There are a range of ways that you can mount switches including wedges and trays, mounting arms or potentially using Velcro to position them straight onto a controller. Positioning a switch in the correct place can be key and it’s also really important to know which type of switch might work best for you. The switches that we’ll be looking at work in a variety of different switch interfaces.

We tend to use switches that will connect via a 3.5 millimetre jack as these are the inputs required for the switch interfaces that we use. Now we’ll have a look at some of the switches that we use. The vast majority of these are digital and whilst they can work as any button on the controller you may find that they take a bit of getting used to if you’re used to using analogue triggers for certain controls. Ultra Light switches are small switches that require a small amount of force to activate. They can be particularly useful for people that have limited movement or strength. Due to their size and shape they can often be put into small spaces and can also often be used alongside one another. Buddy buttons are some of the bigger buttons that we use and can be particularly useful if you’re planning to use larger movement to press them. They provide a large target so they can be particularly useful if accuracy or accessing smaller buttons is difficult. Buddy buttons require more force than Ultra Lights to activate them. Specs switches are similar to buddy buttons but they are smaller which means that you can potentially fit more of them into a smaller space. They come with a base that can be removed and they also come with a Velcro strap. This can be useful if you’re planning to use one on a wheelchair headrest, for example. The adaptive gaming kit by Logitech comes with twelve different switches. They all have their own Velcro and the kit also includes two different trays. They also come with stickers which can be useful for labelling up your buttons. These small buttons require the least amount of force of all of the Logitech switches. They can be a nice alternative to Specs switches if you require a round switch that doesn’t need too much force to activate. There are three of these included in the kits. There are also four light touch buttons included in the kits. These actually require more force to activate than the Logitech small switches and more force than the Ultra Light switches that we featured earlier in this video. However, if you need a switch of a similar size and shape to an Ultra Light switch but need it to require a little bit more force to activate then these could potentially be quite useful. There are three large buttons included in the kits. These buttons are similar to buddy buttons and they have consistent activation across the entire top surface. This means that wherever you press it as long as it’s with the correct amount of force on the top of the button then you can potentially activate it. There are two variable triggers included with the kits. These triggers are analogue and as such can be used to emulate the triggers on a console controller. These require quite a large movement to fully activate them and currently will only work with the Xbox Adaptive Controller as this will allow for some analogue inputs. If physically accessing buttons is difficult then another way could be to try Sip-and-puff switches. To activate these you either sip or puff into the tubing with these two actions providing two different controls within a game. If physically accessing a controller or buttons is difficult you might want to consider voice controls. Voice controls can give you access to a wide range of controls within a game but you might notice a slight lag or delay when compared to pressing a button. Many thanks for watching this video and if there’s anything that we can do to help with access to gaming then please do get in touch.

Many of the people that we work with find that certain buttons on a standard console controller or mouse and keyboard can be difficult to either reach or press. There are multiple other ways to activate button presses, and in this blog post we will have a look at some of the ways we do this at SpecialEffect.

Mounting a standard controller

It may be that mounting a controller in a particular way can help with accessing the buttons on the controller, as it can be helpful if the user does not have to physically hold onto the controller or hold its weight. This can free up the persons’ hands, so that they can potentially reach and press more of the buttons. There are several ways that you can mount a controller.

Mounting Arms – Mounting arms can be useful, as they take the full weight of the controller, and can be positioned wherever the person needs it to be. Some people will have the controller mounted by their hands, and others by their chin, depending on where it is easiest for them to use it. We tend to use Manfrotto Variable Friction Mounting arms with a mounting plate.

“An image showing a still from the video above of an Xbox One controller and a Manfrotto Variable Friction arm.”

Wedges and Trays – It can also be possible to mount a controller flat onto a tray. For some people, this position will make it easier to reach and press the buttons. If it needs to be at an angle, a wedge can be used.

“An image showing a still from a SpecialEffect video of an Xbox One controller mounted on a Maxess wedge and a Maxess tray.”

Accessibility Switches

If particular buttons on a controller are difficult, another potential option that may help is to use accessibility switches. These come in a variety of shapes and sizes, and can be positioned anywhere that they can be pressed comfortably and repeatedly; this can include having them mounted onto a wheelchair headrest to be pressed with head movement, or positioned onto the floor to be activated with foot movement.

Switches can be used as button presses or to emulate joystick movement. For instance, a switch could be used to emulate ‘Up’ on the left analog stick, for example, and could then be used as a walk forward button in a first-person game.

There are a range of switches available and the correct switch to use will depend on the physical movement and strength that the user has to activate it. It will also depend on where it is going to be positioned.

Positioning a switch in the correct place can be key. Examples we use include using Velcro to position it directly onto a standard controller, placing it on a tray, or mounting it by using mounting arms.

“An image showing a still from the video above of an Ultra Light HD Switch being mounted onto a PS4 controller.”

The switches that are featured in this post work in a variety of different switch interfaces, including the Xbox Adaptive Controller. They all use a 3.5mm jack.

“An image showing a still from the video above of a 3.5mm jack.”

The majority of switches are digital, which means that they are “on” when pressed and “off” when released. They do not allow for gradual activation like the analogue triggers on a standard controller. Digital switches can take some getting used to when used to emulate the triggers, if the person playing is used to analogue triggers. Currently, the only analog switches available that do allow for gradual activation are included in the LogitechG Gaming Kit.

Ultra Light HD SwitchesThese are small digital switches that only require a small amount of force (28g of force) to activate them. If physically pressing the buttons on a standard controller is difficult, these can be helpful, in particular if the user has limited movement or strength. Due to their size and shape, it can also be possible to fit them into small spaces or to position several in close proximity to one another.

“An image showing a still from the video above of an Ultra Light HD Switch being held.”

Buddy Buttons – These are some of the bigger buttons that we use, meaning that they can be useful for users who need larger targets. When positioned correctly, they can be particularly helpful if accuracy or accessing smaller switches is difficult. They require more physical force to activate them (142g) than the Ultra Light HD switches.

“An image showing a still from the video above of a Buddy Button being held.”

Specs Switches – These require less force (100g) to activate than buddy buttons and are smaller in size. This means that it is possible to fit more of them into a smaller space, such as on a tray. They come with an interchangeable base; one is a flat surface, which can make it easier when attaching to a lap tray, and one allows for a Velcro strap to be attached, which is also included.

“An image showing a still from the video above of a Specs Switch being held.”

LogitechG Adaptive Gaming Kit

The LogitechG Adaptive Gaming Kit comes with four different types of switches (12 switches in total), two different types of trays, and Hook and Loop attachment stickers (similar to Velcro). It also includes Xbox One stickers, so that you can label up your switches as the Xbox One button that the switch will be activating.

“An image showing a still from the video above of an Adaptive Gaming Kit being held.”

Small Buttons – There are three of these switches, and they require the least amount of force to activate of any of the other switches included in this kit (actuation force: 56g). They can provide a good alternative for someone who needs a switch that requires less force than a specs switch.

“An image showing a still from the video above of a Small Button being held.”

Light Touch Buttons – There are four of these Light Touch Buttons included in the kit. They actually require more force (actuation force: 59g) to activate than both the Ultra Light HD switches and the Small Switches, but they do provide a nice alternative for someone who needs an Ultra Light HD size and shape switch, but needs it to require more physical pressure.

“An image showing a still from the video above of a Light Touch Button being held.”

Large Buttons – There are three of these large buttons included in the kit. They are similar to buddy buttons, and also provide consistent activation across the entire top surface of the switch (actuation force: 101g). This means that, provided you press anywhere on the top surface of the switch with the correct amount of physical force, you can potentially activate it.

Variable Triggers – There are two Variable Triggers included, and these switches are analogue. They are the only switches to provide gradual activation (actuation force: 107g) in the same way that the triggers on a controller does, which can make them useful for certain situations, such as when accelerating or braking in racing games. They require quite a large movement to activate them, and they are bigger in size than the triggers on a standard controller. These switches will only currently work with the Xbox Adaptive Controller, as this will allow for some analogue inputs.

“An image showing a still from the video above of a Variable Trigger being held.”

Alternative Options

If physically pressing buttons or switches with a part of the body is difficult, then there are other potential options.

Sip and Puff Switches – This can include Sip and Puff Switches. These come with a tube which can be positioned near to a person’s mouth, so that they can sip/puff on the end to provide two separate inputs, which in turn activates two different buttons.

“An image showing a still from the video above of a Sip and Puff switch being held.”

Voice Controls  Voice controls are another option and these can provide a wide range of in-game controls. Users do sometimes notice a slight lag/input delay when playing a game which may not occur when pressing buttons. More information on using voice controls to access games can be found on the blog: https://gameaccess.info/tag/voice/

Equipment Demonstrated in the Video (unafilliated lnks)

Manfrotto Variable Friction arm: https://www.manfrotto.com/uk-en/photo-variable-friction-arm-italian-craftsmanship-244n/

Manfrotto Super Clamp: https://www.manfrotto.com/uk-en/super-photo-clamp-without-stud-aluminium-035/

Heavy Duty Switch Mounting Plates: http://www.inclusive.co.uk/heavy-duty-switch-mounting-plates

Trabasack Curve Connect:  https://trabasack.com/products/curve-connect/

Maxess Mounting Trays and Mounts:  http://www.maxesssite.co.uk/html/mptraymount.html

Atec Ultra Light HD Switch:  http://www.atengineering.us/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=154

Buddy Button: https://www.ablenetinc.com/buddy-button

Specs Switch: https://www.ablenetinc.com/specs-switch

LogitechG Adaptive Gaming Kit: https://www.logitechg.com/en-gb/products/gamepads/adaptive-gaming-kit-accessories.html

Sip and Puff Switches: https://www.liberator.co.uk/sip-puff-switch-with-headset

 

If you have any questions, please visit the ‘Contact Us’ page.

 

Video by Cara Jessop

Music:

“Adding The Sun” by Kevin MacLeod

Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/5708-adding-the-sun

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/

“Scheming Weasel” (faster version) by Kevin MacLeod

Link: https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song/4326-scheming-weasel-faster-version-

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/