Untitled Goose Game | Controls

Untitled Goose Game is a slapstick-stealth-sandbox, where you are a goose let loose on an unsuspecting village. Make your way from peoples’ back gardens to the high street shops and the village green, setting up pranks, stealing hats, honking a lot, and generally ruining everyone’s day.

House House

Untitled Goose Game contains a number of input options that allow you to change the way you interact with the game. In this post I’ll go through what these options are and how they can be configured for Nintendo Switch, Windows, and macOS.

For more information on the game itself, please visit the developer’s website https://goose.game/


Action Mapping

Whether you’re using a mouse, keyboard or controller, Untitled Goose Game allows you to remap each action in the game to a different input. To configure the controller or mouse and keyboard mappings, go the Options and select Adjust Controller or Adjust keyboard and mouse

Both configuration pages show the current mappings, as well as an option to reset these to the default configuration.

Controller configuration. Reset to default. Move mapped to left stick. Run mapped to B. Grab mapped to A. Honk mapped to Y. Crouch mapped to ZL. Flap mapped to ZR. Zoom in mapped to L. Zoom out mapped to R. Back.
The default controller configuration for Nintendo Switch.
Keyboard and Mouse Configuration. reset to default. Up mapped to Up Arrow. Down mapped to Down Arrow. Left mapped to Left Arrow. Right mapped to Right Arrow. Mouse Move mapped to Mouse Left Click. Run mapped to Shift. Grab mapped to Z and Right Mouse Click. Honk mapped to Space. Crouch mapped Control and C. Flap mapped to X. Zoom in mapped to S. Zoom Out Mapped to A and Scroll Wheel. back.
The default mouse & keyboard configuration for Windows and macOS.

To remap an action, select it, and when prompted physically press the input you want to use. This will add the input to the default input (you can have a maximum of two inputs per action). To map only one input to an action, clear the existing action before remapping. Mapping the same input twice will have the same effect.

When using a controller you can remap every action to whichever input you prefer, except move, which must be mapped to either the left or right stick. You can also map actions to the four directions of the left or right joystick. So you could use the left stick to move and then set each of the four directions on the right stick to run, grab, honk, and crouch for example.

Controller configuration. Reset to default. Move mapped to left stick. Run mapped to Right Stick Down. Grab mapped to Right Stick Right. Honk mapped to Right Stick Left. Crouch mapped to Right Stick Up. Flap mapped to ZR. Zoom in mapped to L. Zoom out mapped to R. Back.
A configuration that binds the right stick directions to different actions.
Controller configuration. Reset to default. Move mapped to right stick. Run mapped to R. Grab mapped to A. Honk mapped to Y. Crouch mapped to ZR. Flap mapped to X. Zoom in mapped to Right Stick Click. Zoom out mapped to B. Back.
An example of a right hand only configuration.

Input Interactions

House House have also added options that change the way you need to interact with an input to perform a certain action.

run, bend (crouch), wings (flap), and zoom can all be changed from Hold to Toggle. So rather than having to hold an input down to continue to perform an action, you only need to press that input once and the action will continue to activate until the input is pressed again.

Options. Reset to default. Run set to Toggle. Bend set to Toggle. Wings set to Hold. Zoom set to Hold.
Choose between Toggle or Hold for certain actions.

Input Devices

Untitled Goose Game supports a number of input devices for each of its platforms. On the Nintendo Switch you’re able to use either a Pro Controller or a pair of Joy-Cons (in Handheld mode or detached from the Switch). On Windows and macOS, both mouse and keyboard are supported, as well as Xbox, PS4, and other controllers.

It’s also possible to use multiple devices simultaneously on Windows and macOS. So for example you could combine a keyboard with an Xbox controller and use different inputs from each.


For full compatibility and further information on accessibility, see the official support page https://goose.game/support/

How to Set Up Voice Controls on Console | How to…Video

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cross, triangle. Here at SpecialEffect we are always looking at new ways for people to play games if using a standard controller is difficult. In this video we are going to show you how you can set up voice controls on consoles to emulate button presses using a free piece of software called GAVPI and a Titan Two Adapter. We are using a PlayStation 4 for this video, but this setup will also work for Nintendo Switch and Xbox One. The equipment that you will need to set this up include: A Windows PC, a PS4 console and controller, a Titan Two, and a headset with a microphone, the headphones that we are using are called Turtle Beach P11. You will also need three micro USB cables, one of which is included with the Titan Two. First we will have a look at getting the hardware set up, and then we will have a look at the software. Before we start, remember to make sure your console is configured to use USB Communication for controllers, to ensure that it works with the Titan Two. Plug the Titan Two’s micro USB cable into the output slot on the Titan itself, and then plug the other end of this cable into the controller port on your PS4 console. Now connect your PC to the Titan Two via the Prog slot on the back of the Titan using your second micro USB cable. Now connect your PS4 controller to Input A on the front of the Titan Two with your last micro USB cable. Even if you aren’t going to be using the controller itself you do need to do this as the PS4 needs an official PS4 controller plugged into the Titan to be able to verify. Now plug your headset into the PC. Your hardware setup will look something like this. Now we will have a look at the software. The First thing you need to do is set up your mic for speech recognition. Now let’s have a look at GAVPI software, the link to the website is in the description of this video. First you need to make a new profile. Now add a phrase by right clicking under Triggers. We would recommend saying the name of a button to activate that button, for example saying “cross” to press Cross. However you can use any word that you can easily and reliably say. Now we are going to create an Action Sequence. Give the sequence a name such as “Press Cross”. Now add a new action to the sequence. Click the From Press button, and now select which keyboard key you want the sequence to activate. In this case we will use X. This action is for KeyDown.
We now need to time how long the button is going to be pressed down for. So change the action type to Timing and add a timing action of 100 milliseconds. We now need a KeyUp to release the button. So change the action type back to KeyPress, add a new action, and this time set the Press Type to KeyUp. Now you could add a comment to help you remember which keyboard key you will be pressing. Now we need to link the sequence to the phrase trigger. Right click the Action Sequence and select Add to Trigger. Let’s try this one more time. This time we will set up the word “triangle” and the keyboard press T to activate the Triangle button on the PS4 controller. Now we will save the profile as “PS4Controller”. And now you can close the profile page. Click the Listen button to set GAVPI to listen for the commands we just made. If you get this error message, just go to the Settings and press Save. Let’s have a look at using the cross command out of game. So when I say the word, cross, the software displays that it has picked up the word and presses the X key, and likewise when I say, triangle, T is pressed. Now we need to have a look at the Titan Two software which is called GtunerIV. First you need to download Gtuner, the link to the software is available in the description for this video. Now open the software, you need to make a New Input Translator. You need to name the file, we are calling ours “PS4Controller”. Go to Meta Information and also name this “PS4 Controller”. Now go to keyboard mapping, create new key. You now need to map whichever keys you used for GAVPI, for example we used X for Cross and T for Triangle. To find out which button is the Cross key on a PS4 controller, click Help, and then click GPC Input Reference. Or you can do this by pressing F1. This brings up the button list for the controller. Look down the PS4 list and find the button you want to map. For us we are using Cross button, which is BUTTON_16. So now we close the list and go back to the second drop down menu, and select BUTTON_16. Now we are going to do the same for Triangle. Now click Save, you also need to copy the profile onto the Titan Two. Click the Install to memory slot icon and select Memory Slot 1. Now load the profile by right clicking the profile and selecting Load Memory Slot, or by clicking the number to the left of the profile name. Now open GAVPI and set it to Listen. Now go back to Gtuner, click Tools, and Select KMG capture. Press Enter In Capture Mode so that Gtuner and the Titan will convert keyboard keys into button presses according to the profile we created. Now we can have a look at the commands working in-game Here we are having a look at Overwatch. So when I say, cross, the character jumps. When I say, triangle, the character uses their Ultimate ability. When you have stopped playing you need to do the following: To exit Capture Mode, press CTRL and ESC keys, on GAVPI now select stop listening. Select “Modify” to add more commands to your profile. For some commands you will need to hold a button down, such as using a command for walking forwards. We will use the trigger name and phrase “forward”, and the keyboard key W. When making the sequence we will have a key down but not a key up. To make the sequence stop, you will instead need a stop command. The stop command will release the walk forward key. Remember to link the Action Sequences to the corresponding phrases. Save your profile after making any changes. We are going to use the same profile in Gtuner that we used for button presses. Create a new key map. Select W in keyboard mapping. For the controller input, it will be the vertical axis on the left stick, which is “STICK_2_Y”. Then click inverted to make sure it emulates pushing the stick forward. Now save the profile and install it onto memory slot one on the Titan Two. Remember to reload the profile after making any changes. Now as before set GAVPI to listen, and put Gtuner into Capture Mode. Now let’s have a look at walk forward and stop in-game. When I say, forward, the character walks, when I say stop, the character stops walking. A walk forwards command can work well, but in many games you will need access to one joystick to control the camera. Thank you for watching this video. If you would like to discuss voice controls or any of the other work that we do then please do get in touch. cross, stop, triangle, forward.

In this video we have a look setting up voice controls to play games on PS4. This setup will also work for Nintendo Switch and Xbox One.

We’ll create our own profile for a piece of voice control software called GAVPI using a Windows 10 Laptop. We’ll also be using a Titan Two adapter to connect the Laptop to the PS4, and creating a script for the Titan that converts voice commands into inputs on a PS4 controller. We’ll then take a brief look at using the setup to perform some of the actions in Overwatch.

For a look at a ready made script that aims to provide access to the full controller, please see this post which will also show you how to incorporate it into your own setup.

Any questions, get in touch via the Contact Us page.

How to Import Voice Control Profiles | How to… Video

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In this video we will be looking at how to use voice controls on console using a PC and a Titan Two Adapter, and then we’ll look at how to import profiles so you can use them in your own set up. The voice control software that we will be using is a free piece of software called GAVPI. We have made a voice control profile that emulates all of the controls on the standard console controller. This video will show you how you can import this profile to use it with your setup. If you would like to use this profile you can find it in a link in the description below this video. You can also use this video to learn how to import any other profile not just ones that we have made. We are using a PlayStation 4 for this video, but this setup will also work for Nintendo Switch and Xbox One. The equipment that you will need to set this up include: A Windows PC, a PS4 console and controller, a Titan Two, and a headset with a microphone, the headphones that we are using are called Turtle Beach P11. You will also need three micro USB cables, one of which is included with the Titan Two. First we will have a look at getting the hardware set up, and then we will have a look at the software. Before we start, remember to make sure your console is configured to use USB Communication for controllers, to ensure that it works with the Titan Two. Plug the Titan Two’s micro USB cable into the output slot on the Titan itself, and then plug the other end of this cable into the controller port on your PS4 console. Now connect your PC to the Titan Two via the Prog slot on the back of the Titan using your second micro USB cable. Now connect your PS4 controller to Input A on the front of the Titan Two with your last micro USB cable. Even if you aren’t going to be using the controller itself you do need to do this as the PS4 needs an official PS4 controller plugged into the Titan to be able to verify. Now plug your headset into the PC. Your hardware setup will look something like this. Now we will have a look at the software. The First thing you need to do is set up your mic for speech recognition. Now let’s have a look at GAVPI software, the link to the website is in the description of this video. Import a profile in GAVPI by opening the one you want to use. Go to File and then click Open Profile. Now select the profile, in this case we are using a profile called “PlayStation4Controller.XML”. Now that the profile has been opened we can see the commands that it uses by clicking Profile, and then Modify. So here we have all of the Phrases on the left, and the corresponding Actions on the right. Now we can close the profile page and test the profile by clicking Listen. If you get this error message, just go to the settings and press save. So now if I say some of the commands from the profile. cross, are two, triangle, the software displays that it has picked up the phrases. press Stop, to stop listening. Now we need to have a look at the Titan Two software which is called GtunerIV. First you need to download Gtuner, the link to this software is available in the description for this video. Now open the software. Before we transfer a script onto the Titan Two, we first need to open the script in Gtuner Go to File, and then Open. Now select the Titan Two script that links up to your GAVPI profile. In our case we will select “ConsoleController.gpc”. If your script has a .git at the end, that isn’t a problem that process will be exactly the same. Transfer the script onto the Titan Two by clicking the Install to Memory Slot icon and choosing a memory slot. We will install it onto memory slot 1. You can see on the right it is now installed onto slot 1. For this particular case we will also need to install a second script onto the Titan. We will repeat the process with a different script called “ConsoleController-Suspend”, this time installing it onto memory slot 2. Load the memory slot by clicking the number to the left of the script. We’ll load slot 1 here. To make the Titan convert keyboard keys into button presses we need to Enter Capture Mode. To do this click tools and then KMG Capture. Before entering capture mode we need to go back to GAVPI and set it to listen. Now we can press ENTER IN CAPTURE MODE, and the Titan will convert the keyboard keys in GAVPI into inputs on the console. Press CTRL and ESC keys to exit capture mode at any point. Thank you for watching this video. If you would like to discuss voice controls or any of the other work that we do then please do get in touch. cross, stop, triangle, forward.

In instances where you have a voice control profile that has already been created and want to use it in your own setup, the profile will need to be imported before it can be used. This video will show you how to import voice control profiles into GAVPI software, and then also how to import matching profiles into GtunerIV so that you can use voice controls to play games on console.

We’ll be showing this process on PlayStation 4, but it will also work on Nintendo Switch and Xbox One. You’ll need a Windows device to run the voice recognition software, in our case we’re using a Windows 10 laptop, and you’ll also need a Titan Two adapter to connect it to the PS4.

If instead you want to create your own profile, or to add more commands to an imported profile, please see this post below on creating your own profiles.

If you have any questions, please visit the Contact Us page.

A SpecialEffect Voice Control Script | How to… Video

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When playing games on console you might find that certain button presses or joystick movements can be difficult. If this is the case there can be ways to emulate console controls using voice controls. In this video we’re going to have a look at a script that we have made that will allow you to utilise the functions of the controller using your voice. Most games do require physical access to at least one of the analogue sticks but you can use voice to use most of the other buttons. The voice controls will work best if you have a clear speaking voice and can play games in a room with limited background noise. You will notice that there can be some input delay when using voice controls. Voice controls can work well for single-player games but you may find that some multiplayer games or games that require really fast inputs can be challenging. God of War is a game that you can play with one joystick and a “Walk Forward” command. This is because to your character closely follows your camera so you don’t need to be able to use both joysticks at the same time. Here we have a look at general character movement and how you can use voice commands for some of the in-game controls. For standard button presses you just say the command for that button, for example, we’ll say “R1” to press the button “R1”, “R1”, “R1”, “R2”. You can also use this script to hold the stick in certain directions. For example you could say “Forwards” to make the character walk forwards and then use the right stick to steer the camera which also changes the direction that the character will move in. If I say stop then it will let go of the stick and the character will stop moving. “Forward”, “Stop”, “Forward”. You can also say “Left”, “Right” or “Backwards” to move the character in those directions. “Left”, “Stop”, “Right”, “Stop”, “Backward”, “Stop”. When you say “Forward” or any other direction it emulates the joystick being pushed fully in that direction. This will make the character walk or run at their highest speed. If you need to walk a bit slower you can just say “Slow Forward” and this will only emulate the joystick being partially pushed in that direction. This will create slower character movement. “Slow Forward”, “Stop”, “Slow Left”, “Stop”. If you have access to one of the sticks there might be times in the game or in the menus when you need access to the other stick. So we have added a “Swap Sticks” command to allow you to do this. So if you’re using the right stick for camera, for example, but you need the left stick to access the menus you just say “Swap Sticks” and it will turn your right stick into the left stick. “Options”, “Swap Sticks”, “Options”, “Swap Sticks”. Some games require you to repeatedly press a button in quick succession. If this is difficult for you then one way you can get around this is by using this voice control script. If you say, “Rapid Fire” and then say the button that you need to be pressed, it will repeatedly press that button until you say, “Let Go”. “Rapid Fire Circle”, “Let Go”, “Rapid Fire Circle”, “Let Go”. You could also use rapid fire in other situations such as combat.”Rapid Fire R1″, “Let Go”. Some games require you to hold down a button and you can also do this with voice commands. So we’re going to have a look at Forza Horizon using a hold down command for right trigger which is “Accelerate”. We’ll use a joystick for steering. “Hold RT”, “Let Go”. For braking we’ll have a look at holding down a button for a long period of time using a voice command. “Hold RT”, “Let Go”, “Hold Long Time LT”. Some games require you to use a combination of button presses, for example in Mario Odyssey you press Left Trigger and B together to do a backward somersault. We can do this using the script by saying, “Build Combo”, then saying the two buttons you need to be able to press and then say, “Run Combo.” It will remember the combination that you have built until you next say, “Build Combo.” So you can keep saying “Run Combo” and Mario will keep doing the backward somersault, for example. “Build Combo”, “Zulu Lima”, “Bravo”, “Run Combo”, “Run Combo”, “Run Combo”, “Build Combo”, “Zulu Lima”, “Bravo”, “Run Combo”, “Run Combo”, Sometimes in games you, need to be able to press a button and then shortly after press another button. For example in Mario Odyssey you can press a button to make Mario jump and another one to make him throw his cap. So we’re going to have a look at how you can build a combo doing this. You have to build the combo: say the first button, say “Short Time”, then say the next button, and then say “Run Combo”. “Build Combo”, “Bravo”, “Short Time”, “Young”, “Run Combo”, “Run Combo”, “Build Combo”, “Bravo”, “Short Time”, “Young”, “Run Combo”, “Run Combo”. There might be situations where you want to turn the analogue stick into button presses. So for example in this script you could say “Button Mode Left”, and it would make the left analogue stick act as the face buttons. So usually the left analogue stick will make Mario run around, but if I say “Button Mode Left”, now if I press up Mario will throw his cap. If I press the stick down he will jump. “Button Mode Left”. If accessing the right stick is easier for you you can say “Button Mode Right” and it will do the same thing – turn the right analogue stick into button presses. To turn this off just say “Button Mode Right” and now the joystick will go back to being camera movement. There might be situations where you want to turn the voice controls off, for example just to take a break from gaming, or if someone comes into the room and you need to speak to them. To do this you just say “Deactivate” and that will turn the voice controls off. As soon as you want to play again just say “Activate” and that will switch the voice controls back on. “Young”, “Young”, “Young”, “Bravo”, “Bravo”, “Young”. Thank you for watching this video. If you’d like to talk about voice controls or any other video game access method, then please do get in touch.

We made a voice control script that aims to replicate using a PS4, Xbox One, or Nintendo Switch controller to play games. In this video we give a run down of some of the features in the script while playing God of War, Forza Horizon 4 and Super Mario Odyssey.

We’re using a piece of software called GAVPI to detect voice commands and press keyboard keys. Alongside that we’re using a Titan Two device and its own GtunerIV software to convert those keyboard key presses into gamepad inputs and forward them to the game console. Any voice recognition software will work as long as the commands are mapped to the keyboard keys that correspond to the right functions in the Titan Two script. If you want to try this script, you can download the file below for GAVPI, which is what we’ve used in the video, but there is also a file that contains the same profiles for VoiceAttack.

Unzip the file and you’ll find three folders inside. One for the GAVPI profiles, another for the Titan Two scripts, and a third called “Extras” which contains PDF’s of all the voice commands in the script, as well as some sounds which you can add to your GAVPI profile to help you keep track of the Rapid Fire, Hold and Build Combo commands.

To add sounds to your profile, edit one of the Action Sequences and add a PlaySound Action to any of the Rapid Fire, Hold or Build Combo sequences. You can use the MP3 files in the Extras folder or add your own!

You can remove any commands that you aren’t using simply by deleting the phrase from the Triggers section in GAVPI. Refer to the PDF in the Extras folder for further info on this.

For a short guide on how to import the script into your own setup, please see this post.

And to learn how to add commands to the script, or to create your own scripts, this post will cover the basic steps.

If you have any questions, please visit the Contact Us page.