FIFA 21 | Accessibility Options

Screen shot of Fifa title screen.

FIFA (EA) is a game that we use a lot at SpecialEffect. It has some features and settings that can make the game more accessible to some players.

In this post we will look at the options we use with players through our projects. We tested FIFA 21 primarily on the PlayStation, but the control options are also available on Xbox and PC, and the equivalent inputs are also used on Xbox and PC too (when playing with a controller). When the PlayStation controls are mentioned here, the equivalent Xbox controls will be put in brackets afterwards e.g. Circle (B).

The information in this article is correct to the best of our knowledge at the time of writing (November 2020).

Accessibility Menu

FIFA 21 has an accessibility menu which has several options to help with input access to menus, including remap buttons and stick functionality.

You can access this from the home menu by going across to the Customise tab > Settings > Accessibility.

screen shot of Accessiblity menu.
Accessibility menu under the Customise and Settings menus.

You can also access it directly from the home screen by selecting the accessibility icon, and you can reach it during a match by pressing the Options button and selecting Settings.

Screen shot of Accessiblity menu on the home screen.
Accessibility menu on the home screen.
Screen shot of settings menu when the match is paused.
The Settings menu when the match is paused.

Remap Right Stick Functionality:

Turning this setting on switches the functionality of the Right Stick to the Left Stick. This allows you to navigate through many of the main menus using just the Left Stick. This only applies to the menus and will not change the controls required for gameplay.

Screen shot of Right Stick functionality in Accessibility menu.
Remap Right Stick Functionality selected in Accessibility menu.

Remap L1/R1 Buttons and L2/R2 Buttons Functionality:

Turning this setting on changes the functionality of the L1/R1 and L2/R2 buttons in many of the menus to the Left Stick. This allows you to navigate through all the setting options with the Left Stick. Again, this only applies to the menus and will not change the controls required for gameplay.


Screen shot showing Remap L1/R1 Buttons and L2/R2 Buttons Functionality selected in the Accessibility menu.
Remap L1/R1 (LB/RB) and L2/R2 (LT/RT) Buttons Functionality selected in the Accessibility menu.

Controller Settings

Customisable Controls

FIFA 21 allows you to remap the buttons in-game, so if you find a button hard to reach/press you could remap it to a one that you find easier. An example would be if you find it difficult to press Triangle (Y) for Through Ball but could more easily press Square (X), you could swap these two controls.

You do this by going into Customise > Settings > Customise Controls.

Screen shot showing the Customise Controls menu under the Customise and Settings menus.
The Customise Controls menu under the Customise and Settings menus.

You would then press the X (A) button on the control you want to change.

Screen shot showing that the Triangle button has been selected and is waiting to be remapped.
The Triangle button has been selected and is waiting to be remapped.

You then press X (A) again on the control you want to change it to.

Screen shot showing that Triangle and Square have been swapped.
Triangle and Square have been swapped.

You can also access this menu during a match by pressing the Options (Menu) button and selecting Settings, then Customisable Controls.

Bear in mind that when swapping buttons, the original function of that button will be swapped. If you are swapping a button to one you cannot activate on the controller, you will need to play the game without that button.

Control Options

FIFA 21 has four preset control options – Classic, Alternate, Two Button and One Button. The Classic control mode requires the following buttons:

Screen shot showing Classic controls for attack.
Classic controls for attack.
Screen shot showing Classic controls for defence.
Classic controls for defence.

If using all of the buttons in Classic Mode is difficult, One and Two Button Mode may provide an alternative.

Two Button Mode

We have used Two Button Mode with many of the people we have worked with. It enables you to play offline and online matches with just a Left Joystick and Cross and Circle (A and B on Xbox).

Screen shot showing Two Button Mode controls and controller layout for defence.
Two Button Mode controls and controller layout for attack.
Screen shot showing Two Button Mode controls and controller layout for defence.
Two Button Mode controls and controller layout for defence.

Your pass button, which is Cross (A), will do a ground pass or a through pass depending on the direction of your pass and the situation with the player you are passing to. If you hold the pass button you will do a lob, again depending on the direction of your pass and the situation with the player you are passing to. When you do not have the ball your pass button will become your standing tackle, and your shoot button, which is Circle (B), will become your sliding tackle.

When you are out of possession you will need to press L1 (LB) to change player. By default, Auto Switch is set to Air Balls and Loose Balls. Auto Switching can be made full Auto which means that the game will switch player for you, removing the need for L1 (LB). How to turn this option on is explained later in this post under ‘Auto Switching’.

In Two Button Mode ‘auto sprinting’ is always turned on. This means that the game will sprint for you when there is space to do so and the situation may benefit from it. However, if you have access to the sprint button (R2 or RT) you can still use this to sprint manually.

One Button Mode

One Button Mode enables you to fully play FIFA with just one joystick (Left Joystick) and one button which is Cross on PlayStation and A on Xbox.

Screen shot showing One Button Mode controls and controller layout for attack.
One Button Mode controls and controller layout for attack.
Screen shot showing One Button Mode controls and controller layout for defence.
One Button Mode controls and controller layout for defence.

In a standard game, the Left Joystick acts as player movement. When you are in possession, the Cross (A) button is used for all types of kick, including passing and shooting. The type of kick played will depend on the situation you are in, the direction you are aiming and how long you hold the button for. Sometimes you may be expecting to shoot but a pass will be played instead, but with practice you learn in which situations a certain type of kick will likely be played.

When out of procession the button will act as both sliding and light tackle depending on the circumstance. When out of possession the game will auto switch your player to the individual nearest the ball.

When your player has the space to run it will automatically sprint whether you are in or out of possession.

To select One or Two Button Mode, go into Customise > Settings > Customise Controls. You then, by default, use the R2/L2 (LT/RT) to scroll through this menu until the controller mode you want is selected. If you then press Back (Circle on PlayStation or B on Xbox) the game will automatically save this mode selection.

Screen shot showing Customise Controls menu under the Customise and Settings menu.
Customise Controls menu under the Customise and Settings menu.

If using the R2/L2 (RT/LT) buttons for the menus is difficult you can change this to the left joystick by going into the accessibility menu which is mentioned previously in this post.

In both One and Two Button Mode you still need to press the Options (Menu) button to start the game in the Xbox One and PS4 versions of the game. On Xbox Series S/X, PS5 and PC versions, the match will load without the skills training. The Options (Menu) buttons will be needed to pause the match, however, to access the in-game menu.

Screen shot showing that the Options button is required to start a match after the game has loaded.
The Options (Menu) button is required to start a match after the game has loaded, even in One and Two Button Mode.

One and Two Button Mode will work for offline and online play. It will also work in all the different game modes in FIFA (Volta, Career etc.) but you might find you need some additional buttons in menus and certain game modes.

*Update* Jan 2021 – A video was created by SpecialEffect Occupational Therapist Joe on FIFA 21’s One and Two Button modes, which has been added here:

Transcript can be found at the bottom of this post.

Auto Switch Player

Auto Switching is a controller setting that enables you to dictate how much the game helps you to switch player when you are not in possession of the ball. The three options are Manual, Air Balls and Loose Balls, and Auto. If you have your controller set to Classic, then Auto Switching will default to Air Balls and Loose Balls. This means that the game will switch player during Lobs, Crosses and Loose Balls. In all other situations you will need to press the L1 (LB) button to change player.

If you want to play in Classic Mode but find switching your player difficult you can set the game to switch player for you. You can find this option under Settings > Customise Controls > Auto Switching and scroll right to select Auto.

Screen shot showing Auto Switching changed to fully Auto in Controller Settings.
Auto Switching changed to fully Auto in Controller Settings.

In One and Two Button Mode the game will automatically carry out Auto Switching. This means that the game will choose the best player for you to control.

Timed Finishing

Timed Finishing has the potential to increase a shot’s accuracy and power and can enable you to score from positions that may not be possible with standard shooting. To trigger a timed finish, you need to be able to press the Shoot button twice, with good timing. The precision and timing of the second button tap determines the result; a perfectly timed tap will increase the shot’s accuracy, while a poorly timed tap makes the shot more likely to miss.


Screen shot showing Timed Finishing turned On in Controller Settings
Timed Finishing turned On in Controller Settings.

Tactical and Legacy Defending

Tactical and Legacy are two different types of defending available in FIFA 21. Tactical Defending gives you the ability to time your tackles and maintain your position. However, timing and player position are a lot more important in this mode.

Legacy Defending gives you the familiar defending controls of past FIFA titles. The position of players is less important, and it is the easier of the two defending options, but it is also easier for the AI to predict your movements. If you are a beginner, it might be worth starting with Legacy Defending and then moving onto Tactical.

These options are only available in offline play.

Screen shot showing Legacy Defending selected in Controller Settings.
Legacy Defending selected in Controller Settings.

Assisted Passing Options

You can change how much assistance your various passes have. The pass options that can be altered are Ground, Through Ball, Shot Assistance, Cross and Lob. There are three levels to choose from: Manual, Semi and Assisted. Having Assisted turned on means that pass direction and power will help you play passes into the receiver’s path and avoid opponent players. Having Shot Assistance set to Assisted means that shot direction always aim towards the goal.

Screen shot showing Passing options all set to fully Assisted in Controller settings.
Passing options all set to fully Assisted in Controller settings.

Game Settings:

There are some game play settings that can be changed to make the game more accessible. These options are available for offline play and when you are playing against the computer. To access game settings, from the home screen, go into Customise > Settings > Game Settings.

On the first Match screen there are a couple of game settings that might be helpful to change.

Difficulty Settings

If you are new to paying FIFA or have a new controller layout, you can change the difficulty of the game. There are six difficulty levels to choose from and the options go from Beginner through to Legendary.

Screen shot showing Difficulty Level changed to Beginner in the Game Settings menu.
Difficulty Level changed to Beginner in the Game Settings menu.

Game Speed

This option allows you to slow down or speed up the gameplay to suit your needs. By default, the game is set to Normal, but you can also select Slow and Fast.

Screen shot showing Game speed set to Slow in Game Settings menu.
Game speed set to Slow in Game Settings menu.

To move through the Game Setting menus by default you need to use R2/L2 (RT/LT). However, you can change this to Left Stick in the Accessibility menu which is mentioned in this post.

Sliders

If you move through the Game Settings menu by pressing R2 (RT) you will come to the User Gameplay Customisation menu and CPU Gameplay Customisation. These menus use sliders which enable you to speed up and slow down how quickly your team and the computer do things such as sprint, take shots etc.

By changing these sliders, you can give yourself an advantage by speeding up your team and slowing down the computer.

Screen shot showing the User Gameplay Customisation menu in Game Settings.
The User Gameplay Customisation menu in Game Settings.
Screen shot showing The CPU Gameplay Customisttion menu in Game Settings.
The CPU Gameplay Customisation menu in Game Settings.

In the User Gameplay Customisation menu there is also an option for Power Bar. This modifies how quickly/slowly the power bar fills up when you pass or shoot. If you seem to be putting too much power into your shots and they are flying over the goal, it might be helpful to turn this down.

Screen shot showing the Power Bar option in User Gameplay Customisation Menu.
The Power Bar option in User Gameplay Customisation Menu in Game Settings.

Practice Arena

If you are not used to your controls or are new to FIFA, a good place to start is in the Practice Arena. This game mode allows you to run freely around the pitch and practice dribbling, shooting and free kick skills. There is no time pressure, and you can take as many shots at goal as you like.

Screen shot showing the Practice Arena.
The Practice Arena.

To access the Practice Arena, go to the main menu and select the Play tab.

Screen shot showing the Play tab selected in the Main menu of Fifa.
The Play tab selected in the Main menu of Fifa.

When you are in the Play menu, go down to the bottom right and select Skill Games.

Screen shot showing Skills Games highlighted in the Play tab
Skills Games highlighted in the Play tab

When this menu is highlighted by default, use the Right Stick and scroll across until Practice Arena is visible. You can then select it.

Screen shot showing Practice Arena highlighted in the Skills Games menu.
Practice Arena highlighted in the Skills Games menu.

If using the Right Stick is difficult you can change this to use the Left Stick by going into the Accessibility menu which is mentioned in this post.

We hope that this post has been useful. If you have any questions, please visit the ‘Contact Us’ page.

Transcript for Video:

FIFA is one of the games that we are most commonly asked for help with playing and the default controls require the use of the majority of the controller. However, there are two other control schemes: Two Button Mode and One Button Mode that can potentially help make the game accessible to many players by reducing the number of inputs required. This video will look at how these control schemes work on Xbox, Playstation and also PC if using a controller. The Nintendo Switch version of the game plays differently and will not be covered in this video. If you are going to be playing with either Two or One Button Modes you may find that it could also be helpful to reduce the number of inputs required to access the in-game menus. For example, by default, to access the practice arena you use the Left Stick to get to the Skill Games Menu and then have to use the Right Stick to move across to Practice Arena. Other parts of the menus require the use of the triggers such as moving from Settings to choose your preset in the Controller Settings menu. Within Settings if you go to Accessibility you can remap the Right Stick functionality. This means that you can navigate through many of the menu options with just the Left Stick. Press Cross or A to select this option. You can also remap the bumpers and triggers needed in the menus to the Left Stick, meaning that you can navigate through Game Settings and the Customise Controls screens using the Left Stick. Press Cross or A to select this option. There are several opportunities to select your control scheme, such as just before a match or by pausing mid-game. Here we will change from Classic Controls to Two Button Mode in the main menu. Go to Customise, then Settings, then Customise Controls. Move across until Attack appears. Now press Down and you can move from Classic to Alternate and then across to Two Button Mode. You will see that Circle will be as Shoot, Cross or A is Pass and Left Stick is to Move Player. R2 or Right Trigger to Sprint is optional as within this game mode Auto Sprint is enabled. This means that the AI will decide when would be best to start sprinting. L1 or Left Bumper can be used to Change Player, but it is possible to remove the need to use this button which we will look at a bit later on in the video. When a match is loading you will first enter a training game. You do not need to play this – you can wait for the game to load. Once the training game is finished you do need to press the Options button to move to the match. Left Stick is used to control player movement as well as direct and aim passes and shots. If you press your Pass button which is Cross or A, you will do a ground pass or a through pass depending on the direction of your pass and the situation with the player you are passing to. If you hold the button down you will do a lob, again, depending on the direction of your pass and the situation with the player you are passing to. Circle or B act as your Shoot button and the longer you hold the button down the more power you will put into your shot. When you do not have the ball your Pass button will become your Standing Tackle and your Shoot button, which is Circle or B, will become your Sliding Tackle. If you find pressing R2 or Right Trigger difficult the game will automatically sprint for you at times that it deems to be appropriate such as when there is space to run into when attacking or tracking back in defence. By default the game is set to automatically switch to the nearest player if you do not have the ball when the ball is in the air or if the ball is loose. This means if the opponent has the ball you need to press L1 to switch player. If you wish to have it set so that the game switches automatically for you in all situations, then you can go to Settings and change this to Auto. You can still override this by pressing L1 if you want to in certain situations. Career Mode gives you the option to play as a single player so you would not be controlling the entire team. When playing this mode you can press or hold the Pass button to call teammates to pass the ball to you. If you press the Shoot button when the teammate has the ball they will take the shot. If accessing two buttons during gameplay is difficult then there is the option for One Button Mode. You can select this mode in the same way that you would on Two Button Mode either via the main menu, just before a match or by pausing the game. Go to Customise Controls, move across until Attack appears, press Down to select the Preset and move across to find One Button Mode. When loading a game you will still need to press the Options or Menu button to get past the training game. When in gameplay Left Stick is Player Movement and the Cross or A button will act as Action. When you’re in possession the Action button is used for all types of kick including passing and shooting. Left stick is used to direct and aim passes and shots as well as move your players. The type of kick played will depend on the situation you are in, the direction you are aiming and how long you hold the button down for. In many situations if you have the ball it will act as a ground or through pass. In some situations, by holding the button down, you may be able to do a long pass or a lob but if the AI feels that a ground pass is more appropriate it may override this and do a ground pass instead. Once you approach the goal your Action button now becomes the Shoot button. Sometimes you may be expecting to shoot but a pass will be played instead but with practice you learn in which situation certain type of kick will likely be played. When you don’t have the ball the Action button will alternate between acting as either Defender Press or Sliding Tackle depending on the situation. As with Two Button Mode, Auto Sprint will be enabled by holding down R2 or Right Trigger will allow you to manually sprint if you choose to do so. As with Two Button Mode pressing L1 or LB will enable you to automatically switch player when you don’t have the ball. However, if you set this to Auto you may find that there isn’t a need to press this button. You can also play Career Mode matches with one button controls and when playing as a single player pressing or holding your action button will call teammates to pass the ball to you or take a shot, depending on the situation they are in. There are some situations that even when using two button or one button control schemes the game may offer prompts to press other buttons. An example would be during a free kick. However, it is possible to play matches on FIFA 21 without using any more than either one or two buttons and a single joystick. If at any point you would like to pause the game when using either two button or one button controls, you will need to press the Options or Menu button. In order to have full control of menus please note that you do need access to at least one joystick and two buttons and also that the Options or Menu button is required to start matches. These control schemes can help to make the game more accessible for many players. We hope that this video has been helpful. If you would like to play FIFA 21 but find that accessing one or two buttons and one analog stick on a standard controller is difficult there are a range of other ways to play that might work best for you. If you would like to speak to SpecialEffect about video game accessibility, then please get in touch.

How to Use an Xbox Adaptive Controller with a Nintendo Switch

Photograph showing an XAC plugged into a Titan Two plugged into an Nintendo Switch console.
Photograph showing an XAC plugged into a Titan Two plugged into an Nintendo Switch console.

The Xbox Adaptive Controller (XAC) is a device designed by Microsoft that enables gamers with limited mobility to access games on Xbox One and Windows 10 PCs. It does this by allowing gamers to use compatible switches and joysticks to create their own customised controller.

A lot of the gamers we work with want to access other consoles, including the Nintendo Switch. In this post we will look at how to use the XAC with a Nintendo Switch using a Titan Two device.

Note that at the time of writing, the XAC will not work with the Nintendo Switch Lite.

Step 1: Setting up the Nintendo Switch

You need to make sure your Nintendo Switch is set up to use wired controllers. You do this by turning on Pro Controller Wired Communication.

Go to System Settings > Controllers and Sensors > Pro Controller Wired Communication > OK

Screen shot showing Pro Controller Wired Communication in settings menu.
Screen shot showing Pro Wired Communication set to On.

This post gives you a step-by-step guide on how to do this: https://gameaccess.info/nintendo-switch-console-settings-for-using-a-titan-two/

If you detached the Joy-Cons to change this setting, place them back on the Nintendo Switch. If you used the Switch in handheld mode to change this setting, place the device back in its dock with the Joy-Cons attached.

Important: if the Joy-Cons are connected wirelessly to the Nintendo Switch when you plug the Titan Two device in later, the setup will not work. To stop this from happening make sure the Joy-Cons are attached to the Switch in the dock and any spare Joy-Cons are switched off.

Step 2: Connecting the devices

To get the XAC working on Nintendo Switch you need an adapter called a Titan Two:

Photograph of Titan Two adapter
A Titan Two adapter.

The Titan Two should work straight out of the box, however it is a good idea to check it has the latest update on it. This post explains in detail how to do this: https://gameaccess.info/how-to-update-a-titan-two-adapter/

The Titan Two comes with a small Micro USB lead:

Photograph of Micro USB lead that comes with Titan Two.
The Micro USB lead that comes with the Titan Two.

Plug this into the OUTPUT slot on the top of the Titan Two:

Photograph of Titan Two adapter showing the OUTPUT slot.
397The OUTPUT slot on the Titan Two adapter.

The Xbox Adaptive Controller comes with a USB–C lead. Plug one end of this into the XAC:

Photograph of the XAC showing the USB-C socket.
The USB – C socket on the back of the XAC.

Plug the other end of this into INPUT A on the Titan Two device:

Photograph showing the USB-C being plugged into INPUT A on the Titan Two.
Plugging the other end of the XAC’s USB – C lead into INPUT A on the Titan Two.

Plug in any accessibility devices into the XAC that you use.

Once you have plugged everything into the Titan Two, plug the other end of the OUPUT cable into one of the USBs on the Nintendo Switch dock.

If it is helpful for your gaming you can add a second controller which will plug into INPUT B on the Titan Two. This controller will work alongside the XAC as player one. This means it can be used to supplement your setup or it can be used by someone else if you need help using some of the buttons/joysticks:

Photograph showing a Titan Two with both USB input being used.
A secondary controller can be plugged into Input-B on the Titan Two

The Nintendo Switch does not need a verifying controller so you can plug in a variety of different controllers to use alongside the XAC. Here are some that we frequently use:

– Nintendo Switch Pro Controller
– PowerA wired Nintendo Switch Controller
– PS4 Controller
– Xbox One Controller

Note that if you are using a non-Nintendo controller then its buttons will be labelled differently to those which will be prompted in-game.

Please don’t hesitate to get in touch via the Contact Us page if you have any questions about using the Titan Two Adapter on consoles.

Equipment Links (unaffiliated):

Titan Two: https://www.consoletuner.com/products/titan-two/

Xbox Adaptive Controller: https://www.xbox.com/en-GB/accessories/controllers/xbox-adaptive-controller

Lucy’s Adapted Gaming Controller | Case Study

Lucy playing using her controller set up.
Photograph of Lucy playing with her set up.

Lucy has a C6 spinal cord injury and hadn’t tried playing games with a standard controller since her injury. She got in touch with SpecialEffect as she wanted to be able to access console games.

She came to the SpecialEffect Games Room (pre-Covid_19 restrictions) and our occupational therapists worked with her as part of our Loan Library project.

In this post we’ll share the techniques and equipment the SpecialEffect team used to create Lucy’s controller. The solutions we used were combined to create a customised controller setup specific to her abilities, but we hope that sharing them will help show some of the range of options that are available to create a customised controller setup tailored to the needs of the individual.

The information in this article is correct to the best of our knowledge at the time of writing (September 2020).

Controller Access

To start the visit, we had a conversation with Lucy about what games she wanted to access and told us she was interested in playing The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild (PEGI 12) on the Nintendo switch.

Difficulty: Lucy had not played games since her injury and due to having no movement in her fingers was unsure how she would access the Nintendo Switch. Lucy has good movement in her shoulders and full movement with her biceps, and full wrist extension.

Solution: A conversation took place with Lucy about her functional movement and what she finds difficult. She demonstrated her movements and it was felt that she might be able to use some parts of a standard controller. Lucy tried a PowerA Nintendo Switch controller, and as she has good movement in her arms and some wrist extension, she was able to use the joysticks and the ABXY buttons on the face of the controller.

Mounting the Controller

Difficulty: As Lucy was unable to grip the controller and hold it in place, the controller moved around too much when she was playing.

Solution: The PowerA Nintendo Switch controller was mounted onto a Trabasack Curve connect tray using Velcro.

The Trabasack Curve Connect tray has a surface that enables Velcro to stick to it. To give Lucy’s hands room to move around the controller, a piece of foam was placed underneath the controller to lift it off the tray. Different thicknesses of foam were tried until Lucy found the height comfortable.

A close up of foam under the controller used to raise it.
The gamepad was supported by a foam block to lift it up from the tray.

Accessing Buttons and Triggers

Difficulty: Lucy wasn’t able to press the four buttons on the back of the controller (R, L, ZR and ZL).

Solution: Lucy was shown the different types of switches that were available. Specs Switches were the most appropriate for her: they offer a fairly large surface area for people who need to use gross movements to press the them but don’t want a switch as large as a Buddy Button.

The Specs switches were fixed to the Trabasack tray using Velcro. They were positioned carefully where Lucy could easily use them but still access the joysticks and the buttons on the PowerA controller.

Lucy using the controller.
Lucy reaching to use one of the AbleNet Specs Switches.

Connecting to the Console

Difficulty: An Xbox Adaptive controller (XAC) was needed to get the Specs switches working with the Nintendo Switch. The Xbox Adaptive Controller is an interface which enables you to create a customised controller setup.

An Xbox Adaptive Controller being held.
An Xbox Adaptive controller, which Lucy’s switches were plugged into.

Solution: A Titan Two device was used to get the XAC working on the Nintendo Switch. The XAC and the PowerA controller were plugged into the Titan Two which was then plugged into the Nintendo Switch. The Titan Two device allowed the PowerA controller and the XAC to be used simultaneously.

Photograph of a Titan Two adapter.
A Titan Two device that allows the gamepad and XAC to be combined and used on a Nintendo Switch console.

Before using a Titan Two on the Nintendo Switch, ‘Pro Controller Wired Communication’ needs to be turned ‘on’ in the ‘Controllers and Sensors’ settings of the Switch. This post explains step by step how to do this: https://gameaccess.info/nintendo-switch-console-settings-for-using-a-titan-two/

The Specs switches were plugged into the RB, LB, RT and LT switch slots in the XAC.

By the end of the visit Lucy was able to play The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild on the Nintendo Switch. We will keep in contact with her and will alter her setup if needed.

Lucy using her controller.

List of Equipment Used:

Below is a list of the equipment we used to create Lucy’s controller set up, with unaffiliated links to the products on the manufacturer’s own websites where possible. Other suppliers are available in most cases:

Xbox Adaptive Controller:

https://www.xbox.com/en-GB/accessories/controllers/xbox-adaptive-controller

https://gameaccess.info/279-2/

Titan Two:

https://www.consoletuner.com/products/titan-two/

https://gameaccess.info/nintendo-switch-console-settings-for-using-a-titan-two/

Trabasack Curve Connect:

https://trabasack.com/products/curve-connect/

AbleNet Specs Switch:

https://www.ablenetinc.com/specs-switch

PowerA wired Nintendo Switch controller:

https://www.powera.com/product_platform/nintendo-switch/#cont1-p

If you have any questions about this controller setup, please visit the Contact Us page.

The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening ׀ Controls

The games's title screen screenshot
Screen shot of title screen

The Legend of Zelda: Link’s Awakening (PEGI 7) is a top-down, action-adventure game available on the Nintendo Switch. It is a remake of the 1993 game which was available on the Nintendo Game Boy.

You play as the character Link, who gets stranded on Koholint Island. To progress through the game, you must defeat/avoid many enemies, solve puzzles and win boss fights. The aim is to collect eight instruments which you will use to awaken the legendary “Wind Fish” so that you can escape the island.

In this post we will take a look at the controls used to play. It is possible to play this game with access to just the left joystick and seven buttons. The right joystick can be used to zoom the map in/out, but you do not need this to play the game.

Controls

Default Controls:

Many of the controls are doubled up and can be accessed by pressing different buttons. For example, you can either press Z or ZR to use your Shield.

Screen shot of system menu showing controller layout.

Left Joystick = Move

A = Confirm/Lift

B = Attack

X/Y = Item: Items get acquired through the game; the Item you need to be equipped with will depend on the mission.

L/ZL = Dash: you must unlock this power before you can use it.

R/ZR = Shield: you need to hold this down at the same time as pressing B to attack your enemy.

+ = Subscreen: this shows Items, Map, and System. You need to use L/R to move between screens. ZL and ZR will also work.

 = Map: you can get to this in the Subscreen as well. As you progress through the game you will unlock more sections of the map – most of it is not visible to begin with.

There is only the default control scheme in Link’s Awakening. If you want to change the controller layout it is possible to do this at a system level. This post explains how to do this:  https://gameaccess.info/how-to-change-button-mappings-on-the-nintendo-switch/


Gameplay

Getting started with Link’s Awakening:

When you first load up the game you will see this screen:

Screen shot of first game screen when you need to press L + R together.

You need to press L and R together to progress into the game.

Once you select a new game you will be asked what difficulty you want to play as:

Screen shot of difficulty options.

Normal: this is the classic difficulty setting. The game does not give you much guidance on how to solve puzzles and where to go on the map to progress. You need to be accurate with your joystick and have good timing with button presses to solve puzzles and defeat bosses.

Hero: in this difficulty setting you take twice as much damage, with no heart drops. It is recommended for advanced players.

Once you get into the game, the first weapon you are given is a shield. You can use this to repel enemies. To activate this, you need to hold down R or ZR.

Screen shot of Link using shield

Later on in the game you will be given a sword; you press the B button to use this. To use this at the same time as the shield you need to hold down R or ZR at the same time as pressing B to use your sword. You can use your sword separately from your shield and vice versa. It is useful to be able to block enemies with your shield while fighting them as this can help reduce the damage you take.

Screen shot of items menu.

As you progress through the game you will acquire different items and weapons. To equip these, you need to go into your Items menu by pressing +. Use your left joystick to move over the Item you want and press X or Y to assign the weapon to that button. You will need different Items for different challenges within the game. Some of these Items you will acquire through the game story. Some Items you can buy (bow and arrows, bombs) or acquire through side quests (boomerang).

If you have any questions about the settings or how to customise the set-up for your needs, please don’t hesitate to get in touch via the Contact Us page.

Using the Xbox Adaptive Controller on Xbox One | How To… Video

Show Transcript

Here at SpecialEffect we use the Xbox One and the Xbox Adaptive Controller with a lot of the people we work with. In this video we’re going to look at getting started with setting up the Xbox Adaptive Controller on the Xbox One. We will also look at Forza Motorsport 7 as an example of a game. When you unbox your new Xbox One you will have the main console itself. You will also have the mains power cable. Also a standard Xbox One Controller and an HDMI lead. The HDMI and the main power cable plug into the back of your Xbox One. The mains power cable plugs into this socket here. You then plug it into a socket in your wall. The HDMI cable plugs into this socket here, labeled ‘HDMI OUT TO TV’. You then plug the other end into a spare HDMI socket on your TV. Once you have your Xbox One all plugged in press the Xbox button on the console to turn it on. If this is the first time you’ve turned on your Xbox One it will most likely need an update. Also the Xbox will give you a series of instructions that you need to follow to set it up, such as connecting to the Internet. Once you have set up your Xbox One you are ready to sync your Xbox One Controller or your Xbox  Adaptive Controller which we will call the XAC from now on. To sync your standard Xbox One Controller if you want to use it wirelessly first need to make sure you’ve got two AA batteries in the back. You then press the Xbox button on the controller until it lights up and press the small black sync button on the top which makes it flash. You then press the small sync button on the Xbox One Console. Then once they both stop flashing the controller is synced to your Xbox One. Syncing the Xbox Adaptive Controller is pretty much the same. It has an internal battery so you don’t need any external batteries for this. Press the Xbox button and then the sync button is this small black button on the back. You then press the sync button on the Xbox One Console. Once they stop flashing the  controller has synced with the console. To move around the Xbox you use the left joystick or the D-pad. Generally in menus A is Select and B is Cancel or Back. It is exactly the same with the Xbox Adaptive Controller. You can use a D-pad to move around and then you have the big A button and a big B button to select to cancel or go back. If you want to make any changes to your Xbox One Controller or the XAC such as button remapping or copilot which allows you to use two controllers as one player you need to go into the Xbox Accessories App. We have made a separate video on how to remap buttons and create profiles on the Xbox Adaptive Controller as well as how to turn on Copilot. The XAC acts as a hub which you can plug compatible peripherals into to create a customised controller. Different peripherals and how they’re positioned will suit players differently. Different games require different inputs. Some games will only require a few whereas some games will require a lot of different inputs. We will look at some of the peripherals we use here at SpecialEffect. We will then look at Forza Motorsport 7 and use some of these in-game. There are a variety of different joysticks and switches available for the XAC that come with different sizes, shapes and forces required to move them. Some joysticks come with a USB fitting. For these joysticks you need to plug them into either the left USB for left joystick, or the right USB for right joystick. Some joysticks come with a 3.5 millimeter jack. For these you need to plug them into the X1 socket for left joystick or the X2 socket for right joystick. These are some of the joysticks that we use here most frequently at SpecialEffect. There are a variety of different switches available for the XAC. These switches all plug in along the back of the XAC. These are some of the switches we most commonly use at SpecialEffect. Also available is the Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kit which has a variety of different switches in it. Once you have set up your controller and you want to play a game you either need to put your game disc in or, if your game is downloaded you either select it from the home screen or you can find the game in My Games and Apps under ‘Games’. The first time you play a game you will need to set aside a bit of time to either download or install the game onto your Xbox One. Games quite often also need updates every now and then so you need to set aside a bit of time   let the Xbox do this. We are now going to look at Forza Motorsport 7. It is a game that we use quite a lot here at SpecialEffect because compared with other games you can play it with reduced controls. It also has Assists which can enable this further still. It is always a good idea in games to have a look at the options because they might have some accessibility features that can make them a little bit easier to play. Once you’re in the game you need to decide how you want to play it. If this is your first time playing Forza it’s probably best to go into Free Play. To access this press the RB button to move across to Single Player. You can then use the left joystick and press A on Free Play. If you want to find the options and assists you press the RB button again to go to Set-up. In this menu you can select your car, you can tune and upgrade, you can set up the race. You can also change the Options. However, you can also find the Assists Menu if you press A. This is where you decide how easy or difficult you want the car to be to control. In these menus, if pressing RB is difficult you can just use the left stick to scroll across. This game does have quite a few default controls. To see what these are you can find them in the Options Menu under Controller. Default controls to this game are:left joystick to steer RT for accelerate LT for brake. LB is clutch if you have the car in manual. RB is look straight back. Press the View button: it changes the view of your car. Y is rewind. X is shift up if you have the car in manual mode. A is handbrake B is shift down if you have the car in manual mode. And the Menu button will pause the game. This game does have a lot of inputs if you want to access the full range of controls. However, if this is difficult it is possible to prioritize some inputs over others to make it a bit easier. It is possible to play this game with just a joystick for steering and two switches: one for accelerate and one for brake. In this set-up we have a joystick plugged into the left USB in the XAC for steering. We also have the green Buddy Button plugged into RT for accelerate and the red Buddy Button plugged into LT for brake and reverse. If you set the driving assists to super easy the steering assist is so strong that you can play this without a joystick. All you need to do is have a switch for accelerate. If you set the driving assist to easy the game will give you some help with braking and steering. However, you will still need to be able to steer with a joystick access inputs for brake and accelerate. One thing to bear in mind is that even though you can play the game with reduced controls you will still need to be able to press the A and the B button and possibly the Menu button to be able to independently set up the game. If this was difficult for someone, someone else could use a standard Xbox Controller alongside their XAC set-up and co-pilot and do this for them. Or, the person could have accessibility switches plugged into these buttons if they were able to access them. Once you have finished playing you can either press the Xbox button and return to the home screen to play another game or, if you hold this button down, you’ll get the option to turn the console off. Thank you for watching this video. If you have any questions about the Xbox Adaptive Controller or accessible gaming in general please contact SpecialEffect.

In this video and post we are going to look at setting up the Xbox Adaptive Controller (XAC) on the Xbox One and then set it up for a game. In this instance, we are using Forza Motorsport 7, a game we use often at SpecialEffect because of its range of assists and options.

1. Setting Up the Xbox One (0:25)

When you unbox your new Xbox One you will find:

  • The console
  • A  power lead
  • An HDMI cable
  • A standard Xbox One controller

Firstly, plug the mains power lead into the back of the Xbox One.

Finger pointing to the mains power socket on the back of the Xbox One console.

Plug the HDMI lead into ‘HDMI OUT TO TV’ which is also on the back of the Xbox.
Plug the other end of the HDMI into a spare HDMI port on your TV.

Finger pointing to "HDMI OUT TO TV" socket on back of Xbox One console.

Press the Xbox Button to turn on the Xbox One.

Finger pressing the Xbox button on the front of the console.

The first time you turn on the Xbox One you will need to do an update and follow a series of set up instructions, which you will be prompted on by the console onscreen.

Syncing Controllers (1:23)

Standard Xbox One Controller – you will need 2 x AA batteries in the back of the controller to use it wirelessly. Press the ‘Home’ button (large top centre button) on the controller until it lights up.

Finger pressing "home" button on an Xbox One controller.

Press the small black sync button on the top of the controller which will make the ‘Home’ button flash.

Finger pressing sync button on the back of an Xbox One controller.

Press the small sync button on the Xbox One Console. The ‘On’ button will flash and then flash in rhythm with the controller, before remaining lit up when paired.

Finger pressing sync button on front of Xbox One console.

To sync the XAC you need to follow the same process. Press the ‘Home’ button on the XAC.

Finger pressing the "home" button on the Xbox Adaptive controller.

Press the Sync button on the back of the XAC.

Finger pressing the Sync button on the side of  the Xbox Adaptive controller.

Press the small sync button on the Xbox One Console. The ‘On’ button will flash and then flash in rythm with the controller, before remaining lit up when paired.

Finger pressing sync button on front of Xbox One console.

Navigating the Xbox Home Menu (2:28 )

To move around the Xbox, you use the left joystick or the Directional-pad (D-pad). Generally, in menus, A is Select and B is Cancel or Back.

It is the same with the XAC. You can use the D-pad on the XAC to navigate around and then you could use the big A button and a big B button for menus, if accessible to you. Alternatively, you can use accessibility switches to do this (see ‘Setting Up the XAC’ section below).

We have made separate videos on how to turn on Copilot, remap buttons and make profiles on the XAC, which can be found here at the bottom of the page.

2. Setting Up the XAC (3:25)

The XAC acts as a hub. You can plug compatible peripherals into it to create a customised controller. The peripherals and how they are positioned will suit players differently. The type/number of peripherals required will depend on the game and the player’s functional ability.

There are a variety of different joysticks and switches available for the XAC that come with different sizes, shapes and forces required to move them.

Joysticks: Joysticks either come with a USB socket or a 3.5 mm jack.

For USB Joysticks: plug the left joystick into the left port and the right joystick into the right port by default.

Finger pointing to left joystick USB on Xbox Adaptive controller.
Finger pointing to right joystick USB on the Xbox Adaptive controller.

For joysticks with a 3.5mm jack connection: plug into X1 for left joystick or X2 for right joystick by default.

Finger pointing at X1 and X2 socket on the back of the Xbox Adaptive controller.

Switches: Switches plug in the back of the XAC. Where you plug the switch in depends on what button you want it to act as in the game. We will show an example of how this might be done, using Forza Motorsport 7 below.

3. Setting Up a Game (5:30)

Once you have set up your controller and you want to play a game you either need to:

  • Insert your game,
  • If your game is downloaded:
    • select it from the home screen
    • Find the game in ‘My Games and Apps’ > ‘Games’.
Screen shot of Xbox screen showing Forza 7 Motorsport in "My Games and Apps"

Setting Up Forza Motorsport 7 (6:31)

Forza Motorsport 7 can be played with reduced controls. It also has assists which can enable this further still. It is always a good idea in games to have a look at the options because they might have some accessibility features that can make them easier to play.

If it is your first time playing Forza 7 Motorsport, then it is probably best to go into ‘Free Play’. You can find this by pressing either the RB button or by scrolling across with the left stick or using the D-Pad from the home screen.

Forza Motorsport 7 Default Controls (7:44)

Forza 7 Motorsport has quite a few default controls. All the default controls are shown in the screen shot below:

Screen shot of Forza Motorsport 7 showing default controller layout.

Forza Motorsport 7 Accessibility: Assists & Reducing Controls (9:00)

This game has a number of inputs if you want to access the full range of controls. However, if this is difficult it is possible to prioritize some inputs over others to make it easier for some players. It is possible to play this game with just a joystick for steering and two switches: one for accelerate (RT) and one for brake (LT).

If you set the global assist setting to ‘Super Easy’ the steering assist is so strong that you can also play this without a joystick. All you need to do is have a switch for accelerate (plugged into RT) with braking also set to ‘Assisted’ to brake for you.

Screenshot showing the Assists in Forza Motorsport 7.

You can find the driving assists menu by selecting the ‘Setup’ menu after you have selected ‘Free Play’ or by pressing pause during game play.

Screenshot showing the Assists menu in Forza Motorsport 7.

Even though you can play the game with reduced controls, you will still need to be able to press the A and B buttons and possibly the Menu button to independently set up the game. If this is difficult for someone, another player could use a standard Xbox one controller alongside their XAC set-up using co-pilot mode to do this for them. Alternatively, the person could have accessibility switches plugged into these buttons if they were able to access them.

Forza Motorsport 7: Exiting Game and Turning Off Xbox One (11:05)

Once you have finished playing you can either press the ‘Home’ button on the controller and return to the home screen to play another game, or, if you hold this button down, you will get the option to turn the console off.

We hope that this guide has been useful. More information on the Xbox Adaptive Controller can be found on the blog here: https://gameaccess.info/tag/xbox-adaptive-controller/ and more information about Forza Motorsport 7 can be found here: https://gameaccess.info/forza-7-super-easy-steering-controls-walkthrough/

If you have any questions, please visit the ‘Contact Us’ page.

Additional videos mentioned in this post:

How to Create a Profile for the Xbox Adaptive Controller: https://youtu.be/Zm61yuuLsKo

How to Set Up Copilot on Xbox One & Windows 10: https://youtu.be/bsni-vug3sU

Video by Cara Jessop

Study And Relax by Kevin MacLeod Link:

https://incompetech.filmmusic.io/song…

License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b…

Donkey Kong Country Tropical Freeze | Controls Walkthrough Video

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Donkey Kong Country tropical freeze is a side-scrolling platform game, available on Nintendo switch. The aim of the game is to make your way through each level by solving puzzles and avoiding enemies and their traps. In this video, we will look at the game and the controls required to play it and any accessibility features that are available. In this video we’ll be using the Nintendo Switch Joy Cons to play the game. However, with the help of adaptors, such as the Titan Two, you can use a range of different controllers including the Xbox Adaptive Controller. When you first turn on the game you are asked to select which mode you want to play. The options are ‘Funky Mode’ and ‘Original Mode.’ This is where you decide how accessible you want the game to be. Original Mode plays the same as the original Wii U version of this game. Funky Mode is the more accessible of the two modes and might be helpful for some players. Items cost less in Funky’s shop and some items are more effective. You can take up to 5 items into a level and set your items in the middle of a level. Any Kong letters you collect are saved when you finish a level, even if you don’t collect them all. Once you have selected your mode, you cannot change this later on in the game. We will look at Funky Mode in a bit more detail later on in this video. You are then asked what control mode you want to play and whether you want to play single or two-player. The control layout options are either default or alternate. In both options, most of the controls are mapped to multiple inputs. The default controls needed to play this game are left stick or d-pad to move and to swim the A or the B button to jump. Pressing Y or X does corkscrew while you’re swimming. Y and X also do ground-pound and your roll attack. ZL or ZR do your pluck. They also do grab throw combined and dismount. Pressing L and R at the same time activates your Kong Pow. This turns enemies that you’re near to into items. The Kong that you have as your companion will determine what the enemy turns into. Pressing + or – pauses the game. The alternate controls are pretty much the same except that the ZR and ZL functions have been swapped with the Y and X functions. If you want to change your controller layout mid game you can press the plus or the minus button. Select options by pressing A. Go down to controls and select the controller you’re using. You can then go back into your game with your new controller layout. At times during gameplay you will need to be able to double tap buttons, such as A or B. You also need to be able to hold buttons. Such as ZL or ZR. There are some situations in the game where you need to be able to hold down ZL or ZR and then press A or B. An example of this would be when you’re jumping between vines. You need to hold ZL or ZR, cling on to them and then press A or B to jump between them. In the world map you don’t need as many controls. You use the left stick or d pad to run around and then press A when you’re on the level that you want to enter. So, once you’ve pressed A to select a level, you want you have an option to either play level or go into your inventory. In your inventory this is where you select items that you want to take into the level with you. If these items are available it might make the level a little bit easier. You press A on the item you want to take in and then you press Y once you’re done. You can either play this game solo or in two-player co-op mode. In two-player mode player one always plays as Donkey Kong, however, player two can play as Diddy Kong, Dixie Kong or Cranky Kong. These characters have all of Donkey Kong’s basic abilities, but they have some of their own extra abilities as well. In single-player, you can only play as the other Kong’s in hard mode. To unlock hard mode, you need to collect every Kong letter in every level of the game. If you select original mode you can only play as Donkey Kong. Other characters can be found in barrels which you can break and they become your companion. This gives you two extra hearts, giving you a total of four. You can also use a character’s special abilities. If you choose to play this game in Funky Mode, you get a choice between playing as Funky Kong or Donkey Kong. If you choose to place Donkey Kong in Funky Mode you’ll start off with an additional heart, so you’ll have a total of three. If you then find a companion in a barrel, you’ll get an additional three, giving you a total of six. You’ll also able to use the companions special ability. The heart in the top left-hand corner of the screen are your lives. The smaller hearts are your companions lives. If your companion loses all his lives it will disappear. Donkey Kong takes the same amount of damage and controls the same as he does in original mode. In Funky Mode you have the option to play as funky Kong. This could be the most accessible way to pay the game. So when you play as Funky Kong, he starts off with five hearts. Funky Kong is able to breathe underwater. Funky Kong can constantly roll and corkscrew. If you play as Funky Kong you will not have access to the other characters in barrels. You also cannot use the Kong Pow move. Funky Kong has got five hearts and will not take damage when you land on most spikes. However, enemies will still hurt you. Funky Kong can jump twice in mid-air, which means that you can jump higher. If you hold down the A or B button you can also slow his fall. These options do make the game easier. However, there are some elements that might still be tricky. You need to have good timing of your button presses you need to be able to double tap the a or the B button to make Funky double jump. You also need to hold the A or B button to make him fall slowly. You need to be able to hold downs ZL or ZR to climb up or along vines, keep hold of barrels before throwing them and also pluck out objects from the ground. Thank you for watching this video. If you have any questions about accessible gaming, please contact SpecialEffect.

Donkey Kong Tropical Freeze is a side scrolling platform game available on the Nintendo Switch. The objective is to make your way through each level solving puzzles while avoiding enemies and their traps.

Controls:

The default controls you need to pay this game are:

Left joystick/D-pad – move/swim

A or B – Jump/swim boost

Y or X – Ground pound, roll attack, corkscrew

ZL or ZR – Grab, throw, pluck, combine, dismount

L + R – Kong POW – This turns enemies into items. The Kong you have as your companion will determine what the enemy turns into.

+ or – Pause

The alternate controls are pretty much the same but the ZL/ZR functions have been swapped with the Y/X functions.

Mode options:

The original mode plays the same as the original Wii U version of the game and does not have any adjustable accessibility features built in.

Funky mode as Funky Kong:

This could be the most accessible way to play the game.

Funky Kong has 5 hearts and does not take damage when you land on most spikes, however enemies will still hurt you.

You can jump twice in mid-air which means you can jump higher and slow down your fall by holding the jump button. You can also roll and corkscrew as much as you want and breathe underwater.

This does make the game easier however there are still some elements that might be tricky.

You still need to have good timing with your button presses.

You also need to be able to hold the A/B button down to make Funky fall slowly and tap A/B twice to double jump. You need to be able to hold down ZR or ZL to climb up ropes, pluck objects out of the ground and keep hold of barrels before throwing them.

Video by Cara Jessop

Music:

Funshine, by Kevin MacLeod from freepd.com

Music from https://filmmusic.io
“Still Pickin” by Kevin MacLeod (https://incompetech.com)
License: CC BY (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/)