How to use an Xbox Adaptive Controller on iOS 14

Screenshot of the Bluetooth settings showing how to select the XAC and what it states when sucessfully connected.
Example of an Xbox Adaptive Controller (XAC) set up with an iPad with peripherals connected for joysticks and button inputs. These peripherals include an XAC Flat Thumbstick from Evil Controllers, a Logitech Medium Switch and a Specs switch playing Sonic the Hedgehog Classic.
Example of an Xbox Adaptive Controller set up with an iPad using peripherals from Logitech, AbleNet and Evil Controllers for joysticks and button inputs to play Sonic the Hedgehog Classic.

The release of iOS 14 now enables the Xbox Adaptive Controller (XAC) to be recognised as a compatible game controller. This means that game apps that include gamepad controller input as an alternative to touch, such as with an MFi (Made For iPhone/iPod/iPad), Dualshock 4 or Xbox Wireless gamepad controller, can now also be played using the XAC.

This post will talk through how to connect the XAC to your iOS 14 device.

Step 1. Turn on Bluetooth

Once your compatible iOS device has been updated to iOS 14 (go to Settings>General>Software Update to do this), open Settings, navigate to Bluetooth and turn On.

Screenshot highlighting the Settings app on iOS and a screenshot highlighting how to turn on Bluetooth within the Settings app on iOS.

Step 2. Turn on and sync your XAC

Turn on your XAC using the Guide button on the top of the controller (the button with an Xbox ‘X’ icon on it) and press the Sync button to the right of the Y switch port on the back of the XAC. The light on the XAC should flash rapidly and you should see Xbox Adaptive Controller listed in the Devices list on your iOS device:

Photos showing where the sync button is on the XAC and which light will illuminate when pressed.

Step 3. Pair your XAC

Select the discovered Xbox Adaptive Controller listed on your iOS device under Devices to pair it. Depending on your settings, you may need to enter your password to pair it and add it to My Devices.

Screenshot of the Bluetooth settings showing how to select the XAC and what it states when sucessfully connected.

Step 4. Set up your controls

Once paired, and if you haven’t already, plug in the combination of joysticks and buttons you require to play and open a compatible game. You should be able to play the game using the inputs on the XAC itself alongside your external joysticks and buttons connected to the XAC. Many games will require additional inputs alongside those found on the XAC itself, so joysticks and switches will need to be added for these. Different games will require different inputs. An online search may help to discover what these are, or you may need to install and open a game to find out.

Top down view of a potential set up using the XAC, Ultrastik joystick and buddy buttons to work with controller supported games.

Step 5. Finding compatible games

Apple now has the Apple Arcade, a subscription service which includes access to a range of games that support gamepad controllers. If you have Apple TV, the app can stream your game to your TV screen (when you have the necessary accessories) to enable a more relaxed or shared gaming experience, such as with console gaming. Games in the Apple Arcade which have controller support will have this listed on their page in the app store, both at the top of the page alongside other features and also further down in the ‘Supports’ section:

Screenshot highlighting where in the app information you can find whether a game is Controller Supported.

Outside of Apple Arcade there are paid for and free games which can be played using the XAC. However, the rest of the app store beyond Apple Arcade games doesn’t have a fixed way to list whether controller support is available for games. As a starting point, we’ve listed below some games we’ve found that do have controller support and included links (unaffiliated) to their pages on the App Store:

For more information as to what joysticks and buttons can be used with the XAC, see our posts about the XAC joysticks we use at SpecialEffect: https://gameaccess.info/how-to-use-joysticks-with-the-xbox-adaptive-controller/ and also the switches we use: https://gameaccess.info/how-to-use-switches-with-the-xbox-adaptive-controller/. 

If you have any questions, do contact us.

‘Mouse Only’ Web Games

Screenshot of Online Basketball showing a side on view of one end of a court and a telegraph coming from the ball showing its path of trajectory.

At SpecialEffect we’re often looking out for games that can be played using just a mouse cursor and a left click (without the need to drag), as these can be suitable for playing with a range of assistive mouse controls. On a recent search of games hosted on the Not Doppler, OnlineGames and Kongregate websites, we tried a range of mouse-controlled games and compiled a short list of some we found could be played this way.

We also tried these games via eye gaze control with a direct cursor control method, using a Tobii 4C with Tobii Gaze Point software. This method of eye gaze allows control of the mouse cursor position within the game in a similar way to a standard mouse – often a required element of gameplay. Non-direct methods of mouse cursor emulation, when using eye gaze, may not be compatible with the style of gameplay within these games.

Please note that although compatible with this combination of hardware and software, some of these games require faster reactions or more accurate control than others and many require a high level of mouse cursor control precision.

Where available, the age ratings have been placed in brackets. You can find the rationale for the age ratings on each game’s website. Please note that the websites and games may require Adobe Flash to be installed and run. They may also include adverts, some which may be accidentally clicked and opened. Many of the games will also be available on other web games websites.

 

Sports

Basketball: http://www.onlinegames.com/basketball/ Take shots at the hoop by choosing the trajectory of the ball as it changes shooting positions. Move the mouse cursor to aim by choosing the point at the peak of the trajectory and a use single left click to take a shot.

Wonderputt: https://www.kongregate.com/games/dampgnat/wonderputt  Take putting shots by moving the cursor behind the ball to direct position and power. Take the shot with a single left click.

 

Puzzle

Wake the Royalty: http://www.notdoppler.com/waketheroyalty.php Wake the royals by combining contraption pieces and rolling them off platforms. Add contraption pieces by moving the mouse cursor to a position and using a single left click to place it.

Ninja Miner: http://www.notdoppler.com/ninjaminer.php Move the Ninja through the mine by moving the mouse cursor to a valid position (indicated by an onscreen arrow interface). Use a single left click to move.

Red Removerhttp://www.notdoppler.com/redremover.php Remove the red shapes without the green shapes dropping by moving the mouse cursor over each shape and using a single left click.

 

Action

Zombie Crusade (13): http://www.notdoppler.com/zombiecrusade.php Stop the Zombies in this tower defence game by moving the mouse cursor to a building location. Use a single left click to select it and another single left click to select from the defence options that appear.

 

Miscellaneous

Pizza Point: http://www.notdoppler.com/pizzapoint.php Make and serve pizza by moving the mouse cursor to people, ingredients and kitchen equipment and using a single left click to select each one.

Moby Dick 1 and Moby Dick 2: http://www.notdoppler.com/mobydick-thevideogame.php & http://www.notdoppler.com/mobydick2.php Survive as long as you can by moving the mouse cursor for Moby Dick to follow and using a single left click to boost or click on the Upgrade onscreen option.

Penguin Diner: http://www.notdoppler.com/penguindiner.php Serve customers by moving the mouse cursor to selectable onscreen areas, then use a single left click to select them.

MazeEye http://www.notdoppler.com/mazeeye.php Collect the keys and exit the maze by moving the mouse cursor on the grid and using a single left click to move MazeEye there.

 

If you have any questions, please Contact Us.

How to Update a Titan Two Adapter

Close up of a Titan Two plugged into a laptop.
Photo of a Titan Two Adapter

Overview

At SpecialEffect we often use a Titan Two Adapter within our work. We have previously written posts highlighting some of the features we use most frequently, such as its role in running voice control scripts and in allowing us to use controllers to work on different platforms.

A new Titan Two Adapter requires a few steps to set it up correctly, one of which includes updating it. For the best results, you will also need to periodically check that its firmware and software are up to date. This post describes how we do this as well as how we further configure the adapter.

Please see our other posts if you are interested in how we use the Titan Two in our work and how you might utilise it.

Updating the Titan Two

Step 1. Download and install theTitan Two software (GTuner IV) from the Titan Two website:

Screenshot of the downloads page for the GTuner software

Step 2. Select Extract All and select your file location:

Screenshot of the downloaded zipped file highlighting the extract all button.

Step 3. Double click on the Gtuner application to open:

Screenshot of the extracted GTuner application.

Step 4. Check for a GTuner software update: Click Tools > Check for Updates (without the Titan Two plugged in):

Screenshot of the route to find the 'check for updates' option in GTuner.

Note: Sometimes a warning message appears as Windows doesn’t recognise the application. If you have downloaded from the GTuner download on the Titan Two website, click More info > Run anyway.

Screenshot of the Windows defender message which may appear. An arrow highlights how to open more info.
Screenshot of the Windows defender message which may appear. An arrow highlights how to run the file.

Step 5. Plug  the Micro USB cable included with the Titan into the  ‘Prog’ port:

Photo of the Titan Two adapter with the Prog port highlighted.

Step 6. Connect the Titan Two to a PC via the USB cable provided. You should see a light appear next to the letter P to the right of the display. 

Note: The Titan Two adapter works best with the quality of USB micro cable provided in the package with the device. It may not work well with other USB micro cables:

Photo of the Titan Two adapter plugged into the laptop via the Prog port.

Step 7. Check for a firmware update. This is the same as Step 4 but with the Titan Two plugged in.

To do this, click Tools > Check for Updates. GTuner will then check for firmware updates and inform you when everything is up to date:

Screenshot of the GTuner software when you run 'check for updates'.

Once you have finished programming the Titan Two, remember to plug the USB cable into its ‘Output’ port before using it.

Further Configuring the Titan Two

The following steps are optional, but we apply them when setting up our Titan Two adapters for reliable use.

Step 1. Configure Titan Two adapter.

Go to Device Configuration (bottom right corner of GTuner next to Device Memory slots) > Recall Loaded Memory slot (scroll down to get this on right hand side of GTuner):

Screenshot of the GTuner software showing how to open Device Configuration and click Recall Loaded Memory slot.

Step 2. Finalise the update by disabling memory slot selection using the controller. We tend to turn this option off to prevent accidental profile shifting during standard gameplay.

To do this, go to Device configuration (bottom corner of GTuner) > Disable memory slot selection using the controller (ensure this is ticked):

Screenshot of the GTuner software showing how to open Device Configuration and click 'Disable memory slot selection using the controller'.

Once you have finished programming the Titan Two, remember to plug the USB cable into its ‘Output’ port before using it.

Once the device is set up, you can find more information on the GameAccess site about the ways in which it can assist with video game access, by searching via the Titan Two tag.

Hopefully you have found this guide useful, but please don’t hesitate to get in touch via the Contact Us page if you have any questions about updating the Titan Two Adapter.

Super Mario Odyssey | Controls

Image showing the Two Player control scheme.
An image of the Super Mario Odyssey menu screen. It shows the option for 2 player as well as the action guide and option menu.
Super Mario Odyssey menu screen

Super Mario Odyssey [PEGI 7] is a Nindendo Switch exclusive 3D platformer game with several control options including ‘Assist Mode’. Assist Mode is similar to ‘Mellow Mode’ in Yoshi’s Crafted World.

In this post we will look at this mode and also the controls used to play.

Standard Mode

In Standard Mode you must explore the kingdom to find the hidden and not-so-hidden moon pieces. If you fall from a height, you lose coins and a life and Mario will restart from your last checkpoint.

Assist Mode

You can switch at any time between Standard Mode and Assist Mode by pressing +, then Options, and Choose Mode.

Assist Mode gives you guidance by way of arrows. You start with double the health of Standard Mode (six health points instead of the standard three).

If you fall from a great height with Assist Mode on, you’ll be brought back in a bubble to where you fell off having lost only one health point. Don’t worry though, as you regenerate health when you stand still in this mode.

When swimming, there’s no air meter.

You’re given longer to complete time trials (with completion times varying according to trial).

The Action Guide

Super Mario Odyssey has a list of the controls scheme and special controls which can all be found in the Action guide. To access the Action Guide, simple press + when already playing a level to bring up the pause menu, and scroll down to select Action Guide. The guide shows you which buttons to press as well as has an image depicting the action on screen.

The Action Guide is a great reference to help a player remember what combination of buttons will do which action (even how to control a T-Rex!). However, this screenshot shows the basic control scheme for one player gaming. Some controls such as throwing Cappy can be used with motion controls or a button press, however motion controls can be turned off in the options setting.

Image of the button layout for single player mode. It shows which button presses or motions will act as what input.
One player button layout

Co-op Play

You can also opt for co-op play in two-player mode at any point by selecting Two-Player in the main menu. The Joy-Cons can be rotated and used sideways as player one and player two. Players can decide who will play as Mario and who will play as Cappy.

Two-player mode can be played in both Standard Mode and Assist Mode. The following screenshot shows the basic controls scheme of co-op two-player mode. 

Image of the button layout for 2 player mode. It shows which button presses or motions will act as what input.
Two player Co-op button layout

If you’re looking for more control walkthroughs and accessibility features, please take a look at the Games category.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us by clicking on the “contact us” page. 

The Evil Within 2 | Controls

Screenshot from the beginning of The Evil Within 2. It features a cat and our main character.
Screenshot from the beginning of The Evil Within 2. It features a cat and our main character.
Screenshot from the beginning of The Evil Within 2

The Evil Within 2 [PEGI 18] is a third-person survival horror game available on PS4, Xbox One and Microsoft Windows. In this post we will focus on the controls when using an Xbox One controller. However, the corresponding input on a PS4 controller will apply in each case.

The Evil Within 2 has some controls and gameplay options which may affect how the game is played and may, consequently, help make the game more accessible to some people. We will take a look at these too.

Gameplay Options

The image shows the General Options menu. This is the menu where you can choose Bethesda.net account assist modes as well as adjust first person mode and language.
General Options Menu where you can choose Bethesda.net account assist modes

The Evil Within 2 has a few modes within the general settings where you can modify your game experience. Assist modes are available to Bethesda.net account holders and these can decrease the difficulty of the game to allow more focus on the story.

First Person Mode – changes the perspective from third to first person

Invincibility Mode – enabling this means that most enemy attacks will cause no damage. There are a few exceptions such as boss fights. This mode requires a Bethesda.net account.

Super Strength Mode – enabling this means that some enemies will require only one hit to kill, though not in all situations. This mode requires a Bethesda.net account.

Infinite Stamina Mode – enabling this means sprinting will not use up your stamina, though it may not work in some situations. This mode requires a Bethesda.net account.

Controls

The controller button assignments have two layouts. Type A is for newer players and those more used to third-person shooters. Type B is for those already familiar with the original game’s controls. Both layouts have default recommended settings which can be altered to the player’s preference.

Type A Layout:

The image shows the Controller layout for the Type A control Scheme. It also shows the default setting which you can later edit.

Type A’s Default Hold/Toggle Settings:

  • Sprint = Press (Toggle) Input
  • Cover = Hold Input
  • Arsenal Menu = Hold Input

Type B Layout:

The image shows the Controller layout for the Type B control Scheme. It also shows the default setting which you can later edit.

Type B’s Default Hold/Toggle Settings :

  • Sprint = Hold Input
  • Cover = Press (Toggle) Input
  • Arsenal Menu = Press (Toggle) Input

In the game, there are certain objects which you can interact with which require specific button inputs. They can require buttons to be held for a certain length of time. Below are some of these and their timings (if applicable):

Skip Dialogue – Hold X when prompted (~0.4 sec)

Look into Mirror/Computer– Hold X (~0.8 sec)

Use Camera – A to operate, L1/R1 to focus, R2 to take photo

Tune Radio – Hold X (0.8 sec)

Opening Generators – Press X when gauge is blue

Struggle – Press A repeatedly

Control Options

The controls options enable you to edit your button assignment, adjust camera controls and sensitivity, as well as adjust the toggle or hold options to your playing style. It also enables you to turn aim assist on or off if you scroll down the options.

This image shows the Controls option menu. In this menu you can adjust the Controller type, change the hold or toggle options for sprint, cover and the arsenal menu, as well as turn aim assist on.
Controls Option Menu

Options include:

Sprint = Hold or Toggle option

Cover = Hold or Toggle option

Arsenal Menu Display = Hold orToggle

Quick Turn = Enable/Disable option

Camera Controls = Invert X and Y axis

Adjust X and Y camera sensitivity (standard is 80%)

Aim Assist = On/Off

We hope that this information was useful. If you’re looking for more information on game controls and accessibility features, please take a look at the Games category on this site.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact us

Pokémon Sword and Shield | Controls Walkthrough Video

Click video for game controls overview
Show Transcript

Hi, I’m Nomi and today we’re going to be looking at the controls for Pokémon Sword. But the controls are exactly the same for Pokémon Shield, too. The game has a few features which can be useful for those who find it difficult to use the Standard Controls.

 In the Standard Controls you use the Left Stick to move around in the Wild Area, when you get to an area of grass you can also use the Left Stick gently to crouch to avoid Pokémon seeing you. The Right Stick is then used to control the camera in the Wild Area. You can also press the L button to rotate your camera towards your direction you’re facing, rather than using the Right Stick. In a city you use the Left Stick to move and the camera will automatically follow you. This means you don’t need to use the Right Stick in cities and towns.

 Y is used to open the Y-Comm which enables you to use the wireless communications as well as the local ones and X is used to open the Main Menu. You press A to Select and you can press B to Cancel. So in a menu, I would press A to select something and I would press B button to cancel. To rearrange the items in your Options Menu you can also press Y and then move the items along with your Joystick and press Y again. The Plus button is used to open the bike. When you are using the bike, you can press the B button to speed up. You can press the Plus button to dismount.You can press the Left Stick Click to whistle to a wild Pokémon to attract its attention.

 In a battle, you can use the Left Stick to make your selection. A to select. When you select Fight; Y will also bring out move information such as the power of the move. Press B to cancel. Y will tell you more about the Pokémon you’re facing, if you select it; It will also do the same for your Pokémon. X will allow you to throw a Poké Ball at the Pokémon. To select another Pokémon, you can use either the Left Stick, the Right Stick or your D-pad, depending on your preference.

 To choose to go camping; you press the X button to open the Menu and then move your joystick or the D-pad towards the Pokémon Camp option. In Pokémon Camp you can use the Left or the Right Stick to move the camera around to look at your Pokémon. To Crouch you can use either the Left Stick Click or the Right Stick Click. A is used to call Pokémon and speak to them. B is used to Cancel. X will bring up the Menu and you can select Play with A Toy. You can choose a Wand Toy and press A to Shake. In the Toy Menu you can press Y to Change Toys and Press A to throw the ball. You can use the L and R button to zoom in.

In the Pokémon Camp the Left D-pad also acts as Y, so you can take out another toyand you can press the Down on the D-pad to put it away. With the Gyroscope turned on you can also use the Right Joy-Con to shake and move the toy. Playing with your Pokémon can increase their friendliness towards you. This can be useful as some Pokémon will only evolve with high friendship or affection. 

Cooking curry is really important in the game as it increases the friendliness of Pokémon House towards you as a trainer. It’s also very useful as it increases the health of your Pokémon, depending on how well you’ve cooked the curry. To start cooking; you press the X button to open the Menu. You just select to Start Cooking with A. You are then asked to choose your key ingredient You can either use the Left Stick, the Right Stick or the D-pad to choose your ingredient and then press A to Select. When it asks you to add key ingredient, you can also press Plus to avoid adding a key ingredient and it will take you straight to the Berry Menu. It then asks you to choose a berry. You can add up to ten berries and you can mix and match your berries. You press the Plus button to continue.

To fan the flames you follow the prompt on screen and press the A button or you can use, with the Gyroscope turned on, a fanning motion with your hand. You then stir it using either the Left Stick, the Right Stick or the Right Joy-Con. Finally, you put your heart into your cooking. You wait for the circle to reach the green zone and press A to add the heart into the cooking. Depending on your timing, and the ingredients you’ve chosen, you’ll be awarded a taste rating and the rating will affect what benefits you get.

 To stop camping you press the X button to open the Menu. You can use the Left Joystick, Right on the D-pad or the Right Joystick to select Take Down Tent and press A to Select. You can also quit camping by pressing the B button and then A to Select Quit Camping.

 Sword and Shield also has an option called Casual Controls. This means that the D-pad buttons double up as the face buttons and you can use either the Left or the Right Joy-Con to play the game entirely. To choose Casual Controls; you press the X button to open up the Menu and you use either the Left, Right or D-pad to go down to Options, A to Select, highlight Casual Controls and scroll left to turn it on. You press A to confirm. This now means I can use the Right Stick in the Wild Area to move my character or the Left Stick.

 With Casual Controls on the camera will follow your player and therefore you don’t need the Right Stick to act as the Camera Control. It also means that the D-pad becomes A, B, X and Y. So, for example, the Up on the D-pad will now open the Menu. You can then use either Stick to navigate the Menu. Down on the D-pad has also become B so you can use that to exit Menus and cancel. Left on the D-pad has become your Y, so you can use it to open the Y-Comm. You can use the Right on the D-pad to confirm and Down on the D-pad to Cancel. If you’re using the Left Joy-Con with Casual Controls turned on, the Minus button will also double up to enable you to open the bike. You can also press the Minus button to close the bike and start walking normally.

 The only downside of using Casual Controls is that the D-pad won’t act as your directional pad anymore. It will always replicate the face buttons. The Casual Controls extend to working in the Pokémon Camp, when you’re cooking curry, Max Raids and also in Pokémon Battles-either Wild or Gym. 

So with Casual Controls on, and using just the Left Joy-Con, I can select Make a Curry with the D-pad I can then use my Left Joystick to select my key ingredient and the Right on the D-pad to select Options. If I want to cancel an option, I can press Down on the D-pad as I would for the B button. The Minus button will also double up as the Plus button in this mode. So you can press the Minus button to say that you’re ready to start cooking and then you press Right on the D-pad to Select A. You then press Right on the D-pad to fan the flames. You can also use the Gyroscope. And then you press Right on the D-pad to add your heart into the cooking. Instant noodle curry! Mmm! Quite happy with it.

 To quit camping you can either press Down on the D-pad as your B button and select with the Right D-pad. Or you can press up on the D-pad to open your Menu, scroll over to take down the tent and press Right on the D-pad. You can choose to fight using the Right D-pad. Scroll through the Options with your Left Joystick. Press Down on the D-pad to Cancel. Press Left on the D-Pad to give you information. And you press Up on the D-pad to select a Poké Ball to use. These controls will be exactly the same for a Max Raid Battle and for Gym Battles.

 The Casual Controls also work well if the Nintendo Switch is in Handheld Mode. In the Options Menu there are also a few other settings which might be useful to try out. There’s an option to change the text speed so you can make the text slower or faster, depending on your preferences. You can also opt to turn the Gyroscope off. This means that you will need to use buttons and the joysticks to navigate through the Pokémon Camp and to make curry.

However, it means that accidentally moving the Joy-Cons won’t interfere with curry making. There are also options where you can invert the Horizontal and Vertical Camera Controls if you find that useful. When you’ve chosen your options you can then press B to set and escape the Menu. Some people can find it easier to have thumb grips on the Joy-Con joysticks, while some people prefer not to. It’s just personal preference really.

 Pokémon Sword and Shield also enables you to use the Nintendo Switch Pro Controller. This means that you can also use a Titan Two adapter alongside the Xbox Adaptive Controller to use joysticks and buttons as your button clicks instead. 

Thank you for watching and please get in touch if you have any questions.

Pokémon Sword and Pokémon Shield (PEGI 7) are the latest instalments in the Pokémon franchise as Nintendo Switch exclusives. This video and accompanying post breaks down the basic controls of the games as well as taking a look at its ‘Casual Controls’ option which can be used to play much of the game one-handed. The control scheme is identical for both Pokémon Sword and Pokémon Shield.

Controls

Left Stick = Move your character in Cities and the Wild Area (and navigate menus).

Left Stick (gently) = Crouch when in an area of grass.

Right Stick = Controls the Camera in the Wild Area. Right Stick is not needed outside the Wild Area.

L = Rotate your camera towards the direction the character is facing. This only works in the Wild Area.

X = Main Menu

Y = Y-Comm – for wireless/local communications.

A = Select

B = Cancel

Y (in Main Menu) = Rearrange the items in your Options Menu.

+ = Open Bike

= Dismount Bike

B (when riding bike) = Speed Up

Screenshot showing a character in third person veiew of a bike.

In a Battle

Left/Right Stick or D-pad = Navigate Menu

A = Select

When you select Fight:

Y = Move information

B = Cancel

Y = Information – about the Pokémon you’re facing and your Pokémon.

X = Throw a Poké Ball at the Pokémon (for wild Pokémon only).

Screenshot of the battle menu in Pokémon Sword. The screen is split in two with the player's character in the toip half and the Pokemon in the bottom.

Camping

To choose to go camping press the X button to open the Main Menu and select the ‘Pokémon Camp’ option. The controls vary slightly from normal gameplay:

Left/Right Stick = Camera

Left/Right Stick Click = Crouch

A = Select – calls or interacts with Pokémon (e.g. press A to use Toy).

B = Cancel

X = Menu

Y/D-pad Left= Change Toy

D-pad Down= Put Away Toy

L/R = Zoom in/out

With the Gyroscope turned on, the Right Joy-Con can be used to shake and move the toy.

Screenshot of camping in Pokémon Sword showing the options along the bottom of the screen
Screenshot of camping in Pokémon Sword showing the options along the bottom of the screen

Cooking Curry

Cooking is an important feature in the game that increases the friendliness and health of your Pokémon, according to how well you’ve cooked the curry. Depending on your timing and chosen ingredients, you’ll be awarded a taste rating which will affect what benefits you get.

To start cooking:

Press X whilst Camping to open the Menu.

A = Start Cooking

Left/Right Stick or D-pad = Choose Key Ingredient and Select.

To skip adding a key ingredient, press +

+ = Select Berries and Start Cooking

A/Wave Joy-Con (with Gyroscope on) = Fan the Flames

Left/Right Stick or Right Joy-Con (with Gyroscope on) = Stir Food

A = Add your Heart into the cooking.

Screenshot showing a cooking pot over a fire and a heart icon overlay with a green ring behind it.
Pressing A within the light green ring gets you a higher score when cooking

Options

Screenshot of the options menu showing how to turn on/off casual controls.

Casual Controls

Sword and Shield  have an option called ‘Casual Controls’ which works in both handheld and docked mode. With Casual Controls enabled, the D-pad buttons double up as the face buttons and you can use either the Left or Right Joy-Con to play the game entirely. The only downside of using Casual Controls is that the D-pad won’t act as your directional pad (D-pad) anymore. It will always replicate the face buttons.

The Casual Controls extend to working in the Pokémon Camp when cooking curry, in Max Raids and in Pokémon Battles – either wild or Gym.

Casual Controls are found in the Main Menu under Options. Highlight Casual Controls and scroll left to turn them on.

Controls when using Casual Controls:

Either stick moves the character in the Wild Area as the camera actively follows the player.

D-pad Up = X

D-pad Right = A

D-pad Down = B

D-pad Left = Y

– (Minus) button = + (Plus) button when using Left Joy-Con and Open/Close the Bike.

Other Options

In the Options Menu there are also a few other settings which can be useful to customise to your preferences. When you’ve chosen your options, press B to set and escape the Menu.

Text Speed – speed up/slow down.

Gyroscope On/Off turning the gyroscope off prevents involuntary movements from interfering with curry making.

Invert Horizontal and Vertical Camera Controls – inverts camera controls if you prefer that set-up.

If you have any questions about the settings or how to customise the set-up for your needs, please don’t hesitate to get in touch via our ‘Contact Us’ page.

Video by Cara Jessop
 
Music by The Britons, by Kevin MacLeod, from freepd.com Blacksmith by Alexander Nakarada Link: https://filmmusic.io/song/4756-blacks… License: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b…