Game ‘Accessibility Feature Tags’ on Microsoft Store for Xbox | Motor Accessibility Video

Show Transcript

Xbox’s ‘Accessibility Feature Tags’ allow players to see whether a game has included particular accessibility features. It also enables the filtering of games using these tags to help you to find games that have included particular accessibility features. This video will be an introduction to using these tags to discover motor accessibility-related features in games.

When navigating the store, games that have included accessibility features and applied the tags may also be highlighted by the badge showing the game accessibility information symbol.

When viewing a game in the store on Xbox, these tags are listed in the information when viewing a particular game. You can find these by scrolling down the game’s store page. A game may also have further information going into more detail on particular accessibility features they provide, which you can access by selecting ‘Discover available features’ below these tags. This will link you to a website page. You can also learn more about tag definitions, by selecting ‘Show feature definitions’ which is also underneath the list of tags for a game.

If you are interested in games that have a particular accessibility feature, you can filter games by Accessibility Feature Tags in the store. To start filtering on Xbox, you need to select a particular group of games. For instance, here, we select the ‘Top New Games’ and then press ‘X’ to bring up the filters. As another example, if you are a ‘GamePass’ subscriber, you could also use the filter on GamePass games in the store.

On Windows PC, when looking at a game the Accessibility Feature Tags can be found under the ‘more’ tab when looking at a game in the Xbox App and they can be used to filter games within the GamePass section of the app using the ‘filter’ dropdown. If a game developer has linked to further information on accessibility features in their game on a webpage, this can be found under the ‘more’ tab, on the game’s store page, too.

On the Xbox.com website, you can use the ‘Accessibility Feature’ tags to search all available games on both Xbox and on Windows PC, using the filters on the left. Again, by clicking on ‘more’ on a game’s store page, you can see all the tags that particular game has and also select a link to access another webpage with more information, when available.

The tags are added by developers themselves for their own games. As not all developers who have appropriate accessibility features in their games have tagged them, not every game which could include these tags will appear, when using the filters. For the same reason, not all games will have accessibility feature tag information available on their store pages. To be able to apply a certain tag to a game, the game must include certain features to qualify.

In this video, we are going to go through the tags available that are related to the motor accessibility of a game and look at their definitions and what a game needs to include to be able to apply these tags to their game.

The first tag we are going to look at is ‘Accessibility on Launch’ which appears under the ‘Gameplay’ heading. Using this filter will show games that allow you to amend certain accessibility settings before you start playing. For instance, in Halo Infinite, you can alter settings right at the outset when first loading the game. A game may not include all settings here (such as motor accessibility options), but it will show you a message letting players know where they can be found.

Also, under ‘Gameplay’, there is a tag for ‘Adjustable difficulty’ which shows games that have ‘multiple ways to adjust the difficulty on in-game mechanics’ and which also include modes for a ‘wide range’ of players to progress. Star Wars Jedi: Survivor, for instance, has various difficulty levels including ‘Story Mode’. Forza Horizon 5 offers a range of difficulties, too, including ‘Tourist Mode’ that slows down the AI opponents in races when you fall behind, allowing you to catch up and rejoin them. It also includes a wide range of assists which can be used to adjust the difficulty and customise gameplay and controls for players.

The ‘On-demand tutorials’ tag shows games which have tutorials that can be accessed during the game ‘explaining basic controls and core mechanics of the game’. These may either be tutorials in which the player has control or videos they watch. Apex Legends has a tutorial available from the main menu, which introduces certain controls and mechanics and in which you can practice various actions while adjusting settings, acting as a space to become familiar with the controls and experiment with settings. Sea of Thieves also has a tutorial that introduces the core controls and mechanics when on foot or sailing.

The ‘Pausable’ tag shows games that can be paused at any point during gameplay or cut scenes, except in multiplayer or during save/load screens. Star Wars Jedi: Fallen Order has this tag and can be paused at any point, such as here during a cut scene. Similarly, Microsoft Flight Simulator can be paused at any point, such as here, mid-flight.

The ‘Progress saving options’ tag displays games that can be regularly saved on multiple slots using both automatic and manual saves at almost any point in a game, to ‘prevent significant loss of in-game progress.’ This tag will allow players to store at least 3 ‘prior game states’ and will provide warnings before saving over save data and will not ‘automatically overwrite itself.’ Both Minecraft and Grounded have this tag and allow players to save games with this criteria.

Under the ‘Input’ filter options, the ‘Adjustable input sensitivity’ tag shows games that have the option to increase or decrease the sensitivity of all analog controls ‘including analog sticks, triggers, race wheels and mouse movement’, if the game uses these inputs. Dirt 5, allows players to adjust various analog settings including deadzones. Similarly, Microsoft Flight Simulator has settings to adjust the sensitivity of all actions linked to the Left Stick, Right Stick and both Triggers.

Under ‘Input’ there is also a tag for showing games that have ‘Full keyboard support’ for games. Games using this tag can be played using just a keyboard, without a mouse or gamepad. Games may not include onscreen key prompts, however. Paw Patrol: Grand Prix allows you to navigate the menus and play with full controls during a race. Minecraft also allows you to do this, using the arrow keys for camera movement when you choose to use the ‘Full Keyboard Gameplay’ option. Pentiment also provides full keyboard support and includes on-screen key prompts.

Input remapping’ displays games that allow you to remap all gameplay controls including sticks, triggers and buttons. Dirt 5, for instance, offers these remapping features to players, as does Star Wars: Squadrons…and Grounded. This tag will also cover games that allow you to invert the x and y axis separately for each stick. The games will also show the remapped prompts on in-game screens. Games under this tag will also have menus that can be navigated with either analog or digital inputs (e.g. Left Stick or D-pad) and will not require multiple buttons to be pressed at the same time.

The ‘No button holds’ tag will show games that avoid needing buttons to be held down for an ‘extended period’ or include options to toggle these. Games may still require inputs to be held for movement and camera movement for analog sticks and D-pad. Inputs that need to be held for a shorter set-duration to complete an action may still be shown using this filter, too. As Dusk Falls includes this tag as it does not require these extended holds, as does Sea of Thieves as it offers alternative toggle options for these actions.

No quick-time events’ displays games that either don’t require rapid repeated button presses shorter than one second to complete an action, such as a quick-time event or a combo, or they will include an option to remove this mechanic from the game. Star Wars Jedi: Survivor and Fallen Order both have this tag and both have an option to remove quick time events. As Dusk Falls includes both an option to use a Single Tap only for quick actions, or No Mashing. It also includes an ‘Extended QTE Timer’ option that lengthens the time between required inputs during quick time events.

Single stick gameplay’ shows games that only need one stick (or the D-pad) alongside buttons and triggers, rather than both sticks. As examples, both As Dusk Falls and Pentiment only use one Stick (or the D-pad) for gameplay and to navigate menus, as do some platformers, such as Celeste, Ori and the Will of The Wisps and Dead Cells. Sea of Thieves, by default, uses both sticks, but also has a tag because it has options to play using a single stick. Using this option, the chosen stick can be used to turn left and right and move forwards and backwards in one state, and then for moving the camera when in another. The Left Trigger input, will alternate between states in this mode. Please note, filtering with this tag may not include games which use both sticks, but which can be played and enjoyed with just one, such as some driving games which may use the Right Stick to move the camera, but which can be enjoyed without this, too.

We hope that this video has been a useful introduction to using the Xbox Accessibility Feature Tags to discover motor accessibility-related features in games. To get started with the tags, as well looking at individual games and using the filters in the store, you can also find games, by viewing the ‘Accessibility Spotlight’ area that shows games with six or more accessibility features tagged. You can currently find these by navigating to ‘Home’ then down to ‘Accessibility Spotlight’, in the store.

For game developers interested in adding tags to their game, Microsoft have provided information, including criterias, for applying tags to games and test steps at learn.microsoft.com

(https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/gaming/accessibility/accessibility-feature-tags)

The ‘Accessibility Feature Tags’ allow players to see whether a game has included particular accessibility features. They can also be used to filter titles to help find games that have included these accessibility features. The tags are available in the Microsoft Store on Xbox, Xbox.com and the Xbox App on PC.

Screenshot of the 'Most played games' in the 'Game demos' section of the store.

In this video and accompanying post, we will go through the tags that are related to the motor accessibility of a game and look at their definitions and what a game needs to include to be able to apply these tags to their game.

Screenshot showing Sea of Thieves' accessibility feature tags on its Xbox Store page.

When viewing a game in the store on Xbox, these tags are listed in the information when viewing a particular game. You can find these by scrolling down the game’s store page. A game may also have further information going into more detail on particular accessibility features they provide, which you can access by selecting ‘Discover available features’ below these tags. This will link you to a website page. You can also learn more about tag definitions, by selecting ‘Show feature definitions’ which is also underneath the list of tags for a game.

Screenshot showing the accessibility tag filter on Xbox with the 'No quicktime events' filter ticked.

If you are interested in games that have a particular accessibility feature, you can filter games by ‘Accessibility Feature’ tags in the store. To start filtering on Xbox, you need to select a particular group of games, such as ‘Top New Games’ and then press ‘X’ to bring up the filters. As another example, if you are a ‘GamePass’ subscriber, you could also use the filter on the group of GamePass games in the store.

Screenshot showing the Xbox PC App tags for filtering in the gamePass section of the app.

On Windows PC, when looking at a game the Accessibility Feature Tags can be found under the ‘more’ tab when looking at a game in the Xbox App and they can be used to filter games within the GamePass section of the app using the ‘filter’ dropdown. If a game developer has linked to further information on accessibility features in their game on a webpage, this can be found under the ‘more’ tab, on the game’s store page, too.

Screenshot of Xbox.com website games search using the 'Accessibility Feature' tags to filter games.

On the Xbox.com website, you can use the Accessibility Feature Tags to search all available games on both Xbox and on Windows PC, using the filters on the left. Again, by clicking on ‘more’ on a game’s store page, you can see all the tags that particular game has and also select a link to access another webpage with more information, when available.

The tags are added by developers themselves for their own games. As not all developers who have appropriate accessibility features in their games have tagged them, not every game which could include these tags will appear, when using the filters. For the same reason, not all games will have accessibility feature tag information available on their store pages. To be able to apply a certain tag to a game, the game must include certain features to qualify.

Below, we will briefly introduce the tags related to motor accessibility. The video above also includes examples of games that have applied these tags.

Gameplay Tags

‘Accessibility on Launch’ Tag (4:18)

This tag can filter, and will appear on the store page, for games that allow you to amend certain accessibility settings before you start playing. A game may not include all settings here (such as motor accessibility options), but it will show you a message letting players know where they can be found.

‘Adjustable Difficulty’ Tag (5:03)

This tag will appear on games that have ‘multiple ways to adjust the difficulty on in-game mechanics’ and which also include modes for a ‘wide range’ of players to progress. It also includes a wide range of assists which can be used to adjust the difficulty and customise gameplay and controls for players.

‘On-Demand Tutorials’ Tag (5:55)

This tag will appear on games which have tutorials that can be accessed during the game ‘explaining basic controls and core mechanics of the game’. These may either be tutorials in which the player has control or videos they watch. 

‘Pausable’ Tag (6:48)

This tag will appear on games that can be paused at any point during gameplay or cut scenes, except in multiplayer or during save/load screens. 

‘Progress Saving Options’ Tag (7:20)

This tag will appear on games that can be regularly saved on multiple slots using both automatic and manual saves at almost any point in a game, to ‘prevent significant loss of in-game progress.’ Games with this tag will allow players to store at least 3 ‘prior game states’ and will provide warnings before saving over save data and will not ‘automatically overwrite itself.’ 

Input Tags

‘Adjustable Input Sensitivity’ Tag 8:00)

This tag will appear on games that have the option to increase or decrease the sensitivity of all analog controls ‘including analog sticks, triggers, race wheels and mouse movement’, if the game uses these inputs. Dirt 5, allows players to adjust various analog settings including deadzones. Similarly, Microsoft Flight Simulator has settings to adjust the sensitivity of all actions linked to the Left Stick, Right Stick and both Triggers.

‘Full Keyboard Support’ Tag (8:42)

Games using this tag can be played using just a keyboard, without a mouse or gamepad. Games may not include onscreen key prompts, however. 

‘Input Remapping’ Tag (9:27)

This tag will appear on games that allow you to remap all gameplay controls including sticks, triggers and buttons.  This tag will also cover games that allow you to invert the X and Y axis separately for each stick. The games will also show the remapped prompts on in-game screens. Games using this tag will also have menus that can be navigated with either analog or digital inputs (e.g. Left Stick or D-pad) and will not require multiple buttons to be pressed at the same time.

‘No Button Holds’ Tag (9:27)

This tag will appear on games that avoid needing buttons to be held down for an ‘extended period’ or include options to toggle these. Games may still require inputs to be held for movement and camera movement for analog sticks and D-Pad. Inputs that need to be held for a shorter set-duration to complete an action may still be shown using this filter, too. As Dusk Falls includes this tag as it does not require these extended holds, as does Sea of Thieves as it offers alternative toggle options for these actions.

‘No Quick Time Events’ Tag (11:15)

Games with this tag either don’t require rapid repeated button presses shorter than one second to complete an action, such as a quick-time event or a combo, or they will include an option to remove this mechanic from the game. 

‘Single Stick Gameplay’ Tag (12:15)

Games using this tag will only need one stick (or the D-Pad) alongside buttons and triggers, rather than both sticks, either by default, or because they include an option to alter the controls from two sticks by default to one. Please note, filtering with this tag may not include games which use both sticks, but which can be played and enjoyed with just one, such as some driving games which may use the right stick to move the camera, but which can be enjoyed without this, too.

We hope that this video and accompanying post have been a useful introduction to using the ‘Xbox Accessibility Feature Tags’ to discover motor accessibility related features in games.

screenshot from the Xbox Store showing the 'Most tagged' games in the 'Accessibility Spotlight' section of the store.

To get started with the tags, as well looking at individual games and using the filters in the store, you can also find games, by viewing the ‘Accessibility Spotlight’ area that shows games with six or more accessibility features tagged. You can currently find these by navigating to ‘Home’ then down to ‘Accessibility Spotlight’, in the store.

You can also find more information about the accessibility feature tags at the following link: https://support.xbox.com/en-GB/help/account-profile/accessibility/game-accessibility-features and you can find more information about searching for games with accessibility features here: https://support.xbox.com/en-GB/help/account-profile/accessibility/search-games-with-accessibility-features 

Screenshot showing the 'Accessibility Feature Tags' information for developers on the learn.microsoft.com website.

For game developers interested in adding tags to their game, Microsoft have provided information, including criteria’s, for applying tags to games and test steps at the below link: https://learn.microsoft.com/en-us/gaming/accessibility/accessibility-feature-tags


Music in Video: Plastic Breath by Tamuz Dekel, Bark Technology by YesNoMaybe, Bleep Bloops by Flint, Orlais by Mintz and Hello World by Flint (all from artlist.io).

Using an Irisbond Hiru with EasyClick Beginner | www.eyegazegames.com

Image showing the first page of games on the Eye Gaze Games website with the Irisbond EasyClick Beginner toolbar running horizontally along the left side of it.
Show Transcript

The Eye Gaze Games website has been created to work with a wide range of eye gaze cameras, when both the camera and website have been set up correctly to work together.

The website works with your eye gaze camera, when you are using it to control the mouse cursor position and a left click. 

 In this video, we will look at how to play on the site using the Irisbond Hiru eye gaze camera and its EasyClick ‘Beginner’ software on Windows. We have a separate video on using its ‘Pro’ software on the site.

With the Irisbond Hiru camera’s EasyClick ‘Beginner’ software, you have constant control of the mouse cursor position, which means you have a few options for how you can choose to play the games. 

When using the EasyClick software in ‘Beginner’ mode, you move your eyes to move the mouse cursor around the screen and the windows mouse cursor icon will follow your gaze. You can look at the buttons onscreen to hover the mouse cursor over them and then use the EasyClick software to left-click and select these using a dwell, blink or switch, depending on which option you have chosen to use in the EasyClick options.  

For instance, here, we are using the Easy Click ‘Beginner’ software’s dwell option, and we can look at the buttons onscreen to hover the mouse cursor over them and dwell for a set amount of time to left-click and select them. 

When using EasyClick’s ‘Beginner’ mode, you can also choose to use the Eye Gaze Games website’s own in-built dwell, which has the advantage of being centralised on the onscreen buttons. Some may find that this can help keep their eyes on a target, whilst dwelling. You can find this option in the eye gaze settings in the Controls Menu on the site or during the Setup Wizard.  

If using this feature, just turn off the dwell click option in the EasyClick software whilst using the website, so you are just using EasyClick to control the mouse cursor and not the clicks. If using the in-built dwell, you can also change settings related to this on the site, such as dwell time and also whether you can make repeat selections whilst dwelling on a button or whether you need to look away and back between each selection.  

Intro Classic & Precise

There are two control schemes built into the website that you can choose between. The first option is ‘Classic’, which uses large onscreen buttons to control actions in both the 2D games, such as the board games,… and the 3D games, such as Open Drive or Gazey Golf.

The second option is ‘Precise’, which is more direct and often uses either smaller onscreen targets in the 2D games,… or uses the mouse cursor position to steer or aim in the 3D games. You can change between these two options in the Eye Gaze settings in the Controls Menu on the Eye Gaze Games site, or in the top left corner of some games.

 With the EasyClick ‘Beginner’ software, you can interact with the website and all of the  games using either the ‘Classic’ or ‘Precise’ control schemes. Here we are using the ‘Classic’ controls scheme in some of the 2D games. We are also using and the in-built dwell, but you can also use the left-click option in the EasyClick Beginner options. We use combinations of the buttons on the left and right to navigate and select pieces and where to place them. For instance, in Chess we select a button to choose a piece,… another button to choose where it moves to,… and a third button to make the move.

Here we are now using the ‘Precise’ mode in some of the 2D games and again using the in-built dwell. We can directly select the piece and then select where to place them. 

Here we are using ‘Classic’ in the 3D games and also using the in-built dwell. In open drive we use the onscreen arrow buttons to steer and in Gazey Golf we use them to aim.

For the 3D games, such as Open Drive and Gazey Golf, the ‘Precise’ control scheme will change the style of gameplay quite considerably and let you control steering and aiming more directly.

When using the ‘Precise’ mode in Open Drive, the vehicle will follow your gaze as you move the mouse cursor around the environment. You steer left by looking to the left of the vehicle. You steer right by looking to the right…and you go forwards by looking ahead of the vehicle. To brake and then reverse you look below the vehicle. If playing in ‘Classic’ mode, you will instead have onscreen buttons to select to steer the vehicle. You will first steer and choose which direction to face using the arrow buttons… and then choose to drive by selecting the button at the bottom of the screen in the centre. You will then select a button in the same location to stop the vehicle, before changing direction again.

If using ‘Precise’ controls, you may find that adjusting the ‘smoothing’ in the settings in the Easy Click ‘Beginner’ software, helps to make steering feel more responsive and so easier to control. Choosing ‘very low’ is the most responsive when you move your gaze, making the vehicle feel like it is turning quicker.

In Gazey Golf, using the ‘Precise’ controls means that your aim will follow your gaze as you move your mouse cursor. Whilst in ‘Classic’ you will use onscreen buttons to direct your aim.

You may also find it useful to explore the Options within the different games to see what settings can be changed for controls and gameplay, too.

We hope that this guide has helped with setting up the Eye Gaze Games website to use with your Irisbond Hiru and its EasyClick ‘Beginner’ software.

To try the games yourself and play for free, visit www.eyegazegames.com

 

The Eye Gaze Games website has been created to work with a wide range of eye gaze cameras, when both the camera and website have been set up correctly to work together.  

In this video, we will look at how the Irisbond Hiru eye gaze camera can be used on Windows to play games on https://www.eyegazegames.com using its EasyClick ‘Beginner’ software. We have a separate video on using its ‘Pro’ software on the site.

The site recognises your eye gaze camera, when you are using it to control the mouse cursor position and a left click. With the Irisbond Hiru camera’s EasyClick ‘Beginner’ software, you have constant control of the mouse cursor position, which means you have a few options for how you can choose to play the games, such as using the site’s ‘Classic’ or ‘Precise’ control schemes and the in-built dwell. Play the video above to find out more.

Timestamps:

0:00 | Introduction to the the Eye Gaze Games website.

1:40 | In-built dwell.

2:43 | ‘Classic’ & ‘Precise’ control schemes intro.

3:55 | ‘Classic’ & ‘Precise’ control schemes in 2D games.

5:10 | ‘Classic’ & ‘Precise’ control schemes in 3D games 


To try the games yourself and play for free, visit www.eyegazegames.com

Music: Eminence Landscapes by Ian Post (atlist.io)

Using an Irisbond Hiru with EasyClick Pro (incl. Beginner Mode) | www.eyegazegames.com

A Zoom bubble interface is visible over one of the games on the Eye Gaze Games menu.
Show Transcript

The Eye Gaze Games website has been created to work with a wide range of eye gaze cameras,

when both the camera and website have been set up correctly to work together.

The website works with your eye gaze camera, when you are using it to control the mouse

cursor position and a Left Click.

In this video, we will look at how to play on the site using the Irisbond Hiru eye gaze

camera and its EasyClick Pro software on Windows.

With the Irisbond Hiru camera’s Easy Click Pro software, you move your eyes to

control where the mouse clicks onscreen.

There are different ways you can choose to do this, using the EasyClick Pro software’s

different modes.

These modes are the Left Click mode,

the Keep Left Click Active mode,

the ‘Click with Zoom’ mode

or the Mouse Movement mode.

You may find that you prefer to use different options for different games,

depending on the accuracy or gameplay controls required.

If you have access to the EasyClick Beginner software, you may also consider this an option

for playing on eyegazegames.com, so we will also cover this in this video.

We will go through each of these modes and look at how they can be used with the different

options available on the site, including the control scheme options and the in-built Dwell option.

There are two control schemes built into the website that you can choose between.

The first option is Classic, which uses large onscreen buttons to control actions

in both the 2D games, such as the board games, and the 3D games, such as Open Drive or Gazey Golf.

The second option is ‘Precise’, which is more direct and often uses either smaller

onscreen targets in the 2D game or uses the mouse cursor position to steer or aim

in the 3D games.

You can change between these two options in the Eye Gaze settings in the Controls Menu

on the Eye Gaze Games site, or in the top left corner of some games.

Here we are using the Classic control scheme on the website in some of the 2D games.

These larger buttons that are spaced apart combine to allow you to control the gameplay.

For instance, in Chess we select a button to choose a piece, another button to choose

where it moves to, and a third button to make the move.

Here we are now using smaller targets with the Precise control scheme, and we can

directly choose pieces on the board and then choose where to move them to.

The smaller targets in the Precise control scheme may allow you to play more directly

and take a go with less selections, but may be more difficult to select targets due

to their size and position.

In the 3D games, the difference between the Classic and Precise control schemes

isn’t just the accuracy required, but also the style of gameplay is changed quite significantly, too.

Here is an example of using the Classic control scheme in the 3D games where we are

using the onscreen buttons to steer and drive in Open Drive.

And here we are using the onscreen buttons to move the camera to aim and hit in Gazey Golf.

When using the Precise mode in Open Drive, the vehicle will follow your gaze as

you move the mouse cursor around the environment.

You steer left by looking to the left of the vehicle.

You steer right by looking to the right and you go forwards by looking ahead of the vehicle.

To brake and then reverse you look below the vehicle.

If playing in Classic mode, you will instead have onscreen buttons to select to steer the vehicle.

You will first steer and choose which direction to face using the arrow buttons and then

choose to drive by selecting the button at the bottom of the screen in the centre.

You will then select a button in the same location to stop the vehicle, before changing

direction again.

Similarly, in Gazey Golf, using Precise mode means your aim will follow your

gaze as you move your mouse cursor around the screen.

Whilst in Classic you will use onscreen buttons to direct your aim.

Classic is a good place to start for many players and can be used with all of the

different mouse control modes in EasyClick in both the 2D and 3D games, though some players

may like the more direct controls that the Precise option offers.

However, in the 3D games, not all the modes in EasyClick Pro will work with it.

We will now go through the different modes in EasyClick and show how each one works with

the two different control schemes on the Eye Gaze Games website.

With the Irisbond Hiru Camera’s EasyClick Beginner software you have constant control of the mouse cursor position,

which means you have a few options for how you can choose to play the games.

When using the EasyClick software in ‘Beginner’

mode, you move your eyes to move the mouse cursor around the screen and the windows mouse

cursor icon will follow your gaze.

You can look at the buttons onscreen to hover the mouse cursor over them and then use the

EasyClick software to Left Click and select these using a Dwell, Blink or Switch, depending

on which option you have chosen to use in the EasyClick options.

For instance, here, we are using the Easy Click Beginner software’s Dwell option,

and we can look at the buttons onscreen to hover the mouse cursor over them and dwell

for a set amount of time to Left Click and select them.

When using EasyClick’s Beginner mode, you can also choose to use the Eye Gaze Games

website’s own in-built Dwell, which has the advantage of being centralised on the

onscreen buttons.

Some may find that this can help keep their eyes on a target, whilst dwelling.

You can find this option in the eye gaze settings in the Controls Menu on the site or during

the Setup Wizard.

If using this feature, just turn off the Dwell Click option in the EasyClick software whilst

using the website, so you are just using EasyClick to control the mouse cursor and not the clicks.

If using the in-built Dwell, you can also change settings related to this on the site,

such as Dwell time and also whether you can make repeat selections whilst dwelling on

a button or whether you need to look away and back between each selection.

With the EasyClick Beginner software, you can interact with the website and all

of the games using either the Classic or Precise control schemes.

Here we are using the Classic controls scheme in some of the 2D games.

We are also using the in-built Dwell, but you can also use the Left Click option in

the EasyClick Beginner options.

We use combinations of the buttons on the left and right to navigate and select pieces

and where to place them.

Here we are now using the Precise mode in some of the 2D games and again using the

in-built Dwell.

We can directly select the piece and then select where to place them.

Here we are using Classic in the 3D games and also using the in-built Dwell.

In Open Drive we use the onscreen arrow buttons to steer and in Gazey Golf we use them to aim.

For the 3D games, the Precise control scheme will change the style of gameplay quite

considerably and let you control steering and aiming more directly.

If using Precise controls, you may find that adjusting the ‘smoothing’ in the

settings in the Easy Click Beginner software, helps to make steering feel more

responsive and so easier to control.

Choosing Very Low is the most responsive when you move your gaze, making the vehicle

feel like it is turning quicker.

In Gazey Golf, using the Precise controls means that your aim will follow your gaze

as you move your mouse cursor.

Like EasyClick’s Beginner mode, the

Mouse Movement option from the Pro toolbar in EasyClick Pro will also

enable you to move the Windows mouse cursor around the screen using your gaze, giving

you constant control of the Windows mouse cursor position.

For instance, here, we are using the Easy Click Pro software’s Dwell option,

and we can look at the buttons onscreen to hover the mouse cursor over them and dwell

for a set amount of time to Left Click and select them.

As with EasyClick’s Beginner mode, using the Mouse Movement option, you

can also choose to use the Eye Gaze Games website’s own in-built Dwell, which has

the advantage of being centralised on the onscreen buttons, which some may find can

keep their eyes on a target to select it more easily.

However, please be aware that you can’t turn off the Click option in the EasyClick

Pro software, so your Dwell, Blink or Switch Click will still be active in addition

to the site’s in-built Dwell and may conflict.

However, you are able to turn off the Left Click in the EasyClick Beginner software,

so there may be an option for players who would like to use the website’s in-built Dwell

option and with similar control over the mouse cursor to EasyClick Pro’s Mouse

Movement mode, whilst playing on the site.

If using the site’s in-built Dwell, the dwell time can be adjusted in the Eye Gaze

options on the website and in the setup wizard.

You can also choose whether you are able to select a button repeatedly without needing

to look away between selections or whether you need to look away and back to it to make

a repeat selection.

As before, if using Precise controls with the Mouse Movement mode in Open Drive, you may find

that adjusting the ‘smoothing’ in the settings in the EasyClick Pro software,

helps to make steering feel more responsive and so easier to control.

Choosing Very Low is the most responsive when you move your gaze, making the vehicle

feel like it is turning quicker.

You can also check the Options within the different games to see what settings can be

changed for controls and gameplay too.

If using the Left Click or Keep Left Click Active option

from the Pro toolbar, you will have a ‘desktop gaze bubble’

that shows where you are looking onscreen.

With Left Click mode you will need to select the Left Click icon in the Pro toolbar

between selections, whilst the Keep Left Click Active mode will not and you will

make left clicks each time you pause your gaze, until you turn the mode off.

With both the Left Click and Keep Left Click Active modes, you will Left Click

at the point you stop moving your gaze, using a Dwell, Blink or Switch, depending on which

option you have chosen to use in the EasyClick Pro software’s options.

You will not be able to use the optional in-built Dwell on the site, so set this to ‘Off’

when setting up your controls on the Setup Wizard or Controls menu with these modes.

Here we are using the Keep Left Click Active method with the EasyClick Pro’s Dwell

option for Left Click.

We are using this mode with the Classic control scheme on the site, which can be used

to interact with the onscreen buttons that can be used to control all of the games this way.

For instance, here, to select the buttons, we hover our gaze over the buttons and use

the Easy Click Pro’s Dwell option to select them to control which pieces are moved where.

If using the Left Click or Keep Left Click Active option in the 2D games, such as the

board games, you can also use the Precise

control scheme to select smaller targets on the boards themselves and control the game

more directly.

If using the Left Click or Keep Left Click Active option when playing the 3D games,

such as Open Drive or Gazey Golf using the Keep Left Click Active mode, you

will need to use the Classic control scheme which has onscreen buttons that can

be selected.

If you would like to try the Precise mode in these games for more direct control, you

will need to use either EasyClick in Beginner mode or use the Mouse Movement mode

in EasyClick Pro, which we showed earlier.

The Click with Zoom mode can be used

to select onscreen buttons on the site using the Classic scheme in both the 2D

and 3D games.

You will not be able to use the optional in-built Dwell on the site, so set this to ‘Off’

when setting up your controls on the Setup Wizard or Controls menu with these modes.

Here we are using the Classic control scheme on the website in some of the 2D games.

These larger targets use multiple steps to allow you to control the gameplay.

The Click with Zoom mode can also be used with the Precise control scheme

on the site in the 2D games to directly choose pieces on the board and then choose where

to move them to.

You cannot use the Precise control scheme with the Click with Zoom mode in the

3D games as they need to reference the Windows mouse cursor position at all times.

Therefore, if you would like to use EasyClick’s Click with Zoom mode, use the Classic

control scheme when playing the 3D games.

Here we are using the Classic control scheme and using the onscreen buttons to steer

and drive in Open Drive.

And here we are using the onscreen buttons to move the camera to aim and hit in Gazey Golf.

If using the ‘Click with Zoom’ mode, the screen will freeze whilst you zoom.

This may affect how difficult it is to control some games where timing is an element.

As before, if you would like to try the Precise control scheme in the 3D games, you will need

to either use EasyClick in Beginner mode or use the Mouse Movement mode

in EasyClick Pro.

We hope that this guide has helped with setting up the Eye Gaze Games website to use with

your preferred method of eye control with the Irisbond Hiru’s EasyClick software.

You may also find it useful to explore the Options within the different games to see

what settings can be changed for controls and gameplay, too.

To try the games yourself and play for free, visit www.eyegazegames.com

The Eye Gaze Games website (https://www.eyegazegames.com) has been created to work with a wide range of eye gaze cameras, when both the camera and website have been set up correctly to work together. 

The website works with your eye gaze camera, when you are using it to control the mouse cursor position and a left click.

 In this video, we will look at how to play on the site using the Irisbond Hiru eye gaze camera and its EasyClick ‘Pro’ software on Windows.

With the Irisbond Hiru camera’s Easy Click ‘Pro’ software, you move your eyes to control where the mouse clicks onscreen. There are different ways you can choose to do this, using the EasyClick ‘Pro’ software’s different modes. These modes are the ‘Left Click’ mode, the ‘Keep Left Click Active’ mode, the ‘Click with Zoom’ mode or the ‘Mouse Movement’ mode. You may find that you prefer to use different options for different games, depending on the accuracy or gameplay controls required.

If you have access to the EasyClick ‘Beginner’ software, you may also consider this an option for playing on eyegazegames.com, so we will also cover this in this video.

We will go through each of these modes and look at how they can be used with the different options available on the site, including the control scheme options and the in-built dwell option.

Timestamps:

0:00 | Intro

2:20 | Eye Gaze Games’ ‘Classic’ and ‘Precise’ control schemes introduction.

6:34 | EasyClick’s ‘Beginner’ mode.

10:34 | EasyClick’s ‘Mouse Movement’ mode.

13:21 | EasyClick’s ‘Left Click’ and ‘Keep Left Click Active’ modes.

15:46 | EasyClick’s ‘Click With Zoom’ mode.


Music: Eminence Landscapes by Ian Post, Clouds by Stanley Gurvich, Ian Post Skipping and Blossom by Stanley Gurvich (artist.io)

Using a Tobii Dynavox I-Series with TD Control | www.eyegazegames.com

Screenshot showing TD Control loading logo on top of Eye Gaze Games website's homepage.
Show Transcript

 The Eye Gaze Games website has been created to work with a wide range of eye gaze cameras, when both the camera and website have been set up correctly to work together.

In this video, we will look at how the Tobii i-13 or i-16 can be used to play games on eyegazegames.com using the different modes available in its TD Control software.

The website has been designed to work with your eye gaze camera, when you are using your eye gaze camera to control the mouse cursor position and a left click. 

There are two control schemes built into the website that you can choose between. There is Classic, which uses large onscreen buttons to control actions in both the 2D and 3D games and there is Precise, which is more direct and uses either smaller onscreen buttons in the 2D games or uses the mouse cursor to steer or aim in the 3D games.

Classic is a good place to start for many players and can be used with all of the different mouse control modes in TD Control. However, some players may like the more direct controls the Precise option offers, but not all modes in TD Control will work with it.

The three modes are: Default, Continuous and Repeat Click.

 We will go through the three different modes in TD Control and show how they can be used to play with the two different control schemes on the Eye Gaze Games website.

TD Control Modes 1 & 2: Default & ‘Continuous’

When using TD Control, the Trace circle will follow your gaze. When you momentarily fixate somewhere onscreen in the Default mode, the Activator will appear. If you look at this Activator button and select it, you will open the Interaction Menu. From here you can choose to left click at this location or you can choose to Adjust Target if you want to enlarge an area first before then clicking on a target within it.

You can also choose to use Continuous mode if you want to speed up this process by using the trace to select a location and then a left click option will appear in place of the Activator icon. You can look at this left click icon to make a click at the location you have just selected. You can access Continuous Mode by looking at the bottom of your screen and selecting the button on the right. You may access it from the Mode menu (also at this location) if you have more than one option for modes set up.

In Continuous mode, you can also choose to Adjust Target, to enlarge an area first before clicking. This will remain on for subsequent selections until you turn it off.

Here we are now using the Classic control scheme on the website in some of the 2D games. We select a button to choose a piece, another button to choose where it moves to and a third button to make the move. Here we are now using the Precise controls scheme and we can directly choose pieces on the board and then choose where to move them to.

Here is an example of using the Classic control scheme in the 3D games where we are using the onscreen buttons to steer and drive in Open Drive. And here we are using the onscreen buttons to move the camera to aim and hit in Gazey Golf.

If using either of these two modes in TD Control, you will not need to use the optional in-built dwell on the site, when setting up your controls on the Setup Wizard or Controls menu.

Both of these modes in TD Control can also be used with the Precise control scheme for many of the games. However, they will not work with the 3D games, such as Gazey Golf or Open Drive using Precise mode, so choose Classic when playing these games. This can be done in the Controls menu, accessed either from the Main menu or via the Pause menu during a game. Some games also have a shortcut in the top left of the screen to switch between the two. 

TD Control Mode 3: ‘Repeat Click’ 

If you would like to play the 3D games more directly by using TD Control in the Precise control scheme, you will need to use the Repeat Click option. This will enable you to have constant control of the mouse cursor onscreen, which the vehicle follows in Open Drive, and the camera follows to aim in Gazey Golf.

To access the Repeated Click mode in TD Control, you will first need to add it to the Mode menu as it is not there by default.

To do this, look or move the mouse to the bottom of the screen, then select the button with the three dots. Next, select the Settings cog and go right to open the Customization menu. Select to customise the Modes menu and add an option below the Continuous Mode icon. Select Repeat Click and then select Add. Exit the menu and when you now look to the bottom of the screen and select the Modes menu icon, the Repeat Click icon will be there.

If using the Repeat Click mode on the Eye Gaze Games website, you can also use the in-built Dwell, which uses a Dwell animation which is centralised on the onscreen buttons, which some may find helpful to select a target more easily. The in-built Dwell Time can be adjusted in the Eye Gaze options on the website or in the Setup Wizard. You can also choose whether you are able to select a button repeatedly without looking away and back to a button and you can also choose the Dwell appearance.

Here is an example of using TD Control’s Repeat Click mode but with the left click turned off and using the in-built Dwell in Eye Gaze Games to make selections on the site. 

Here we are now using the Classic Controls in some of the 2D games. We select a button to choose a piece, another button to choose where it moves to and a third button to make the move. Here we are now using the Precise controls scheme and we can directly choose pieces on the board and choose where to move them to.

Here is an example of using the Classic controls in the 3D games using the onscreen buttons to steer and drive in Open Drive and to move the camera to aim in Gazey Golf.

And here we are using the Precise control scheme and the vehicles follow the mouse cursor and here the camera follows the mouse cursor to aim in Gazey Golf, too.

We hope that this video has been useful is setting up your Tobii i-13 or i-16 and its TD Control software with the Eye Gaze Games website to suit you.

To try the games yourself and play for free, visit www.eyegazegames.com

In this video, we will look at how the Tobii Dynavox I-Series (I-13 or 1-16) eye gaze system can be used to play games on www.eyegazegames.com, using the different modes available in its TD Control software.

The website has been designed to work with your eye gaze camera, when you are using it to control the mouse cursor position and a left click. TD Control has three modes for controlling the mouse cursor: Default, Continuous and Repeat Click. 

We will go through these three different modes and show how they can be used to play with the two different control schemes on the Eye Gaze Games website: Classic and Precise.

Classic uses large onscreen buttons to control actions in both the 2D and 3D games, whilst Precise is more direct and uses either smaller onscreen targets in the 2D games or uses the mouse cursor position to steer or aim in the 3D games.

Timestamps:

0:00 | Introduction to the TD Control ‘modes’ and the Eye Gaze Games website’s Classic and Precise control schemes.

0:44 | Introduction to the ‘Classic’ & ‘Precise’ control schems on the Eye Gaze Games website.

2:03 | How to use either the Default or Continuous modes in TD Control with Classic or Precise controls schemes in the 2D games and Classic in the 3D games on the website.

5:56 | How to use the Repeat Click mode in TD Control to play 2D or 3D games using either Classic or Precise control schemes on the website.

 


Visit https://www.eyegazegames.com to play!  

Music: Tomb by Veshza and A Journey’s Epilogue Instrumental Version by Yehezkel Raz 

Using a Tobii Dynavox PCEye with TD Control | www.eyegazegames.com

Screenshot of Eye Gaze Games homepage with Tobii TD Control interaction menu interface shown over the top.
Show Transcript

The Eye Gaze Games website has been created to work with a wide range of eye gaze cameras, when both the camera and website have been set up correctly to work together.

 In this video, we will look at how the Tobii PCEYE eye gaze camera can be used to play games on eyegazegames.com using the different modes available in its TD Control software. 

The website has been designed to work with your eye gaze camera, when you are using your eye gaze camera to control the mouse cursor position and a left click.   

There are two control schemes built into the website that you can choose between. There is Classic, which uses large onscreen buttons to control actions in both the 2D and 3D games and there is Precise, which is more direct and uses either smaller onscreen buttons in the 2D games, or uses the mouse cursor to steer or aim in the 3D games. 

Classic is a good place to start for many players and can be used with all of the different mouse control modes in TD Control. However, some players may like the more direct controls the Precise option offers, but not all modes in TD Control will work with it.

We will go through the three different modes in TD Control and show how they can be used to play with the two different control schemes on the Eye Gaze Games website.

TD Control Modes 1 & 2: Default & ‘Continuous’

 When using TD Control, the Trace circle will follow your gaze. When you momentarily fixate somewhere onscreen, the Activator will appear. If you look at this Activator button and select it, you will open the Interaction Menu. From here you can choose to left click at this location or you can choose to Adjust Target if you want to enlarge an area first before then clicking on a target within it.

 You can also choose to use Continuous mode if you want to speed up this process by using the trace to select a location and then a left click option will appear in place of the Activator icon. You can look at this left click icon to make a click at the location you have just selected. You can access Continuous mode by looking at the bottom of your screen and selecting the button on the right. You may access it from the Mode menu (also at this location) if you have more than one option for modes set up. 

In Continuous mode, you can also choose to Adjust Target, to enlarge an area first before clicking. This will remain on for subsequent selections until you turn it off.

Here we are now using the Classic control scheme on the website in some of the 2D games. We select a button to choose a piece, another button to choose where it moves to, and a third button to make the move. Here we are now using the Precise controls scheme and we can directly choose pieces on the board and then choose where to move them to.

Here is an example of using the Classic control scheme in the 3D games where we are using the onscreen buttons to steer and drive in Open Drive. And here we are using the onscreen buttons to move the camera to aim and hit in Gazey Golf.

If using either of these two modes in TD Control, you will not need to use the optional in-built Dwell on the site, when setting up your controls on the Set-up Wizard or Controls menu.

Both of these modes in TD Control can also be used with the Precise control scheme for many of the games. However, they will not work with the 3D games, such as Gazey Golf or Open Drive using Precise mode, so choose Classic when playing these games. This can be done in the Controls Menu, accessed either from the Main Menu or via the Pause menu during a game. Some games also have a shortcut in the top left of the screen to switch between the two.

TD Control Mode 3: ‘Repeat Click’ 

If you would like to play the 3D games more directly by using TD Control in the Precise control scheme, you will need to use the Repeat Click option. This will enable you to have constant control of the mouse cursor onscreen, which the vehicle follows in Open Drive, and the camera follows to aim in Gazey Golf.

 To access the Repeated Click mode in TD Control, you will first need to add it to the Mode Menu as it is not there by default.

 To do this, look or move the mouse to the bottom of the screen, then select the button with the three dots. Next, select the Settings cog and go right to open the Customisation menu. Select to customise the Modes Menu and add an option below the Continuous Mode icon. Select Repeat Click and then select Add. Exit the menu and when you now look to the bottom of the screen and select the Modes menu icon, the Repeat Click icon will be there.

If using the Repeat Click mode on the Eye Gaze Games website, you can also use the in-built Dwell, which uses a Dwell animation which is centralised on the onscreen buttons, which some may find helpful to select a target more easily. The in-built Dwell time can be adjusted in the Eye Gaze options on the website or in the Set-up Wizard. You can also choose whether you are able to select a button repeatedly without looking away and back to a button and you can also choose the dwell appearance.

Here is an example of using TD Control’s Repeat Click mode but with the left click turned off and using the in-built Dwell in Eye Gaze Games to make selections on the site. 

Here we are now using the Classic Controls in some of the 2D games. We select a button to choose a piece, another button to choose where it moves to, and a third button to make the move. Here we are now using the Precise controls scheme and we can directly choose pieces on the board and choose where to move them to.

Here is an example of using the Classic controls in the 3D games using the onscreen buttons to steer and drive in Open Drive and to move the camera to aim in Gazey Golf.

And here we are using the Precise control scheme and the vehicles follow the mouse cursor and here the camera follows the mouse cursor to aim in Gazey Golf, too.

We hope that this video has been useful is setting up your Tobii PCEye’s TD Control software with the Eye Gaze Games website to suit you. 

To try the games yourself and play for free, visit www.eyegazegames.comwww.eyegazegames.com

 

 

In this video, we will look at how the Tobii Dynavox PCEye eye gaze camera can be used to play games on www.eyegazegames.com using the different modes available in its TD Control software.

The website has been designed to work with your eye gaze camera, when you are using it to control the mouse cursor position and a left click. TD Control has three modes for controlling the mouse cursor: Default, Continuous and Repeat Click. 

We will go through these three different modes and show how they can be used to play with the two different control schemes on the Eye Gaze Games website; Classic and Precise.

Classic uses large onscreen buttons to control actions in both the 2D and 3D games, whilst Precise is more direct and uses either smaller onscreen targets in the 2D games, or uses the mouse cursor position to steer or aim in the 3D games.

Timestamps:

0:00 | Introduction to the Eye Gaze Games website’s Classic and Precise control schemes.

1:56 | How to use either the Default or Continuous modes in TD Control with Classic or Precise controls schemes in the 2D games and Classic in the 3D games on the website.

5:29 | How to use the Repeat Click mode in TD Control to play 2D or 3D games using either Classic or Precise control schemes on the website.


Visit https://www.eyegazegames.com to play!  

Music: Tomb by Veshza and A Journey’s Epilogue Instrumental Version by Yehezkel Raz (artlist.io)

Using an Irisbond Duo with EasyClick Pro | www.eyegazegames.com

Screenshot showing Eye Gaze Games' game menu and Irisbond Duo UI on the bottom edge of the screen.
Show Transcript

Playing Eye Gaze Games Using an Irisbond Hiru/Duo Eye Gaze Camera on Windows w/ Easy Click ‘Pro’ 

In this video, we will look at how to the Irisbond Duo eye gaze camera can be used with its EasyClick Pro software, to play games on eyegazegames.com in Windows.   

 The website works when you are using your eye gaze camera to control the mouse cursor position and a left click. Depending on your eye gaze camera and the Windows control software you use, you may be able to use some of the different options available on the site, such as using an in-built centralised Dwell, or when more direct and immersive control options are available in certain games, for instance. 

With the Irisbond Duo camera’s EasyClick Pro software, you move your eyes to control where it clicks. You have a few ways to do this. You can use the Keep Left Click Active option, the Click with Zoom option or the Mouse Movement option. You may find that you prefer to use different options for different games. If you have access to EasyClick Beginner, you may also consider this an option for playing on eyegazegames.com, so we will also cover this briefly and we have a separate video on using the EasyClick Beginner software on the site. 

Controlling the mouse cursor and selecting:  

If using the Left Click or Keep Left Click Active option from the Pro toolbar, you will have a ‘desktop gaze bubble’ that shows where you are looking onscreen. You can left click at the point you stop moving your gaze, using a Dwell, Blink or Switch, depending on which option you have chosen to use in the EasyClick Pro’s options. This method can be used to interact with the onscreen buttons that are used to control many of the games. For instance, here, to select the buttons, we hover our gaze over the buttons and use the EasyClick Pro’s dwell option to select them.  

Some game modes use more direct control rather than onscreen buttons and require the Windows cursor to be used to recognise where a player is looking, such as for the more direct control modes used for steering vehicles in Open Drive and Eye Drive and for aiming in Gazey Golf. The ‘gaze bubble’ that follows your gaze in the Left Click or Keep Left Click Active modes won’t be recognised to control them this way, however, there are alternative controls using onscreen buttons available that can be used instead. 

The Click with Zoom option will also have the same restrictions with these games. It can be used to select buttons on the site, but not for these particular control modes that need to reference the Windows mouse cursor position.  

If you do want to use the more direct control modes using control of the Windows mouse cursor, the Mouse Movement option from the ‘Pro toolbar’ will enable you to move the Windows cursor using your gaze, giving you constant control of the cursor position, that the site can recognise. For instance, here, we are using the Dwell option in the EasyClick Pro software, and we can look at the buttons onscreen to hover the mouse cursor over them and dwell for a set amount of time to left click and select them. 

When using the Mouse Movement option, you can also choose to use the Eye Gaze Games website’s own in-built Dwell, which has the advantage of being centralised on the onscreen buttons, which some may find can help keep their eyes on a target to select it more easily.  

You can find this in-built Dwell option in the eye gaze settings on the Eye Gaze Games website or when using the set-up wizard. If using this feature, please be aware that you can’t turn off the click option in the EasyClick Pro software, so your Dwell, Blink or Switch click will still be active in addition to the site’s in-built Dwell. You are able to turn off the click in the EasyClick Beginner software, however, so that may be an option for players who would like to use the Windows mouse cursor to play those games more directly on the site and/or use the website’s in-built Dwell option. 

The site’s in-built Dwell time can be adjusted in the Eye Gaze options on the website and in the set-up wizard. You can also choose whether you are able to select a button repeatedly without looking away and back to a button and also choose the Dwell appearance, between a pie or a shrinking animation. 

Classic & Precise Control Modes 

Using any of the three mouse control modes we have looked at in the EasyClick Pro toolbar, you can interact with the website and many of the games using either Classic or Precise control modes; two options you can find in the Eye Gaze settings on the Eye Gaze Games site. Often the Precise mode will allow you to select smaller targets to interact more directly with games, whilst Classic gives you larger onscreen buttons.  

For the 3D games, such as Open Drive, Eye Drive and Gazey Golf, Precise mode will also let you play more directly, whilst changing the style of gameplay quite considerably in some games, as mentioned earlier. As we said before, only Mouse Movement from the EasyClick Pro mouse control options or the EasyClick Beginner software will allow you to play using these Precise controls in these games, but Classic can be used with any of them.  

As an example of the controls in the 3D games, when using Precise mode in Open Drive, the vehicle will follow your Gaze as you move the mouse cursor. If playing in Classic mode, you will instead have onscreen buttons to select to steer the vehicle. In Gazey Golf, when using Precise mode the trajectory of the ball will follow your gaze, whilst in Classic you will use onscreen buttons. 

If using Precise mode, you may find that adjusting the Smoothing in the settings in the EasyClick Pro software, helps to make steering, feel more responsive and so easier to control. This option is also available in the EasyClick Beginner software. Choosing Very Low is the most responsive when you move your gaze, making the vehicle feel like it is turning quicker. You can also check the Options within the different games to see what settings can be changed for controls and gameplay too.  

To try the games yourself and play for free, visit www.eyegazegames.com

The Eye Gaze Games website has been created to work with a wide range of eye gaze cameras, when both the camera and website have been set up correctly to work together.

In this video, we will look at how to use the Irisbond Duo eye gaze camera with its EasyClick software in Pro mode to play games on eyegazegames.com.

We have a separate video on using EasyClick software in ‘Beginner’ mode to play: https://gameaccess.info/using-an-irisbond-duo-with-easyclick-beginner-software-on-eyegazegames-com/ 

Timestamps:

0:00 | Intro

1:44 | Controlling the Mouse Cursor and Selecting

5:18 | ‘Classic’ and ‘Precise’ Control Options


Visit https://www.eyegazegames.com to play!  

Music: Tomb by Veshza and A Journey’s Epilogue Instrumental Version by Yehezkel Raz (artlist.io)