19-Switch DualSense Interface | PS5

a photo showing the 19-switch DualSense interface, which is a box with 3.5mm switch ports on it connected to a DualSense controller by a cable.

The 19-switch DualSense interface from OneSwitch enables you to use accessibility switches alongside the included DualSense controller to play on a PlayStation 5 (PS5) console. In this post we will look at its features and some of the instances it may be used.

The 19-switch DualSense interface is a modified DualSense controller, that has an external box connected to it by a cable and has switch ports (3.5 mm) for the inputs on a PS5 controller. It has switch ports for the following controller inputs: D-pad, Cross, Circle, Square, Triangle, L1, L2, L3, R1, R2, R3, Left Stick Up, Create, Touchpad button and Options. 

What is a ‘switch’?

An accessibility switch is a piece of hardware that can be used to as an alternative input for a game controller button or keyboard key, for example, depending on the interface it is used with.

They are often connected to a compatible interface via a connected cable, that is pushed into a socket (port) on the interface to connect it. They are available in different shapes and sizes, requiring different types of activation and/or different amounts of force to activate them.

They can often be positioned where it is most accessible and comfortable for a user to activate them, such as by a finger or hand, or by the head or foot. Examples of a few different switches from the Logitech G Adaptive kit for Access controller can be seen in the image below:

Close up photo of some different switches from the Logitech G adaptive Kit for Access controller.

At SpecialEffect we use accessibility switches in almost all of the controller set-ups we create with the people we work with. We use them as inputs for button, trigger and/or stick directions. We sometimes just add one or two, but often use multiple switches in our controller set-ups, sometimes needing to use a switch for almost every button and trigger input on a controller.

Close up photo showing the switch ports on top of the interface with some of them with a switch connected.

Ways to use the 19-Switch DualSense interface

If a player is able to use some of the inputs on it, the connected DualSense controller can also still be used alongside any connected switches, as all of its inputs remain functional. For instance, a player may use the left side of the connected DualSense controller with their hand, but use switches to control the inputs that are found on the right side of the controller. This could also allow a second player to share the controls to play cooperatively – with one player using the DualSense alongside another player using switches.

Photo showing the 19-switch DualSense interface with switches and a hook and loop board from the Logitech G Adaptive Kit being used alongside it.

It could be paired with an additional DualSense controller using the PlayStation 5 console’s ‘Use Assist Controller‘ option, if a player wanted to split the control inputs across the two controllers to use them with different parts of their body, or share the controls with another player and play cooperatively with one DualSense controller each. 

It could also be paired with one or two of Sony’s Access controllers to supplement the available control inputs and switch ports available on those. Such as when a player needs more switches than are available on them. The Access controller itself includes four 3.5 mm ports alongside the included customisable buttons and an analog stick, with a total of eight switch ports if you pair two Access controllers together.

Photo showing the 19-switch DualSense interface with a Sony Access controller alongside it and 8 switches connected to both (2 into the access controller and 6 into the 19-switch DualSense interface. Two external Celtic Magic joysticks are also connected to the Access controller. The joysticks and switches are placed on two Logitech G hook and loop boards.

For instance, if a player uses two external compatible joysticks with an Access controller, they will have two ports left for switches, or six if they use two paired Access controllers. For some players this will be enough switches to use alongside the included button inputs on the Access controller, or a paired DualSense, but some players may need more than this to play the games they want to play.

Comparing the 3.5mm ports with those on the Access controller

The Access controller’s 3.5mm ports also allow players to connect compatible external analog sticks, which the 19-switch DualSense interface does not. The same types of switches can be used with both, excluding the Logitech G Variable Triggers that come in their Adaptive Gaming Kit, these will not work with the 19-switch DualSense interface.

Amongst the 19 ports, the 19-switch DualSense interface includes a switch input for Left Stick Up, allowing players to use an accessibility switch for forwards movement in-game. This can be useful if using two joysticks is difficult or impossible for someone. With this method you use one stick to look/aim/turn, whilst moving forwards, using a switch instead of a second stick. This ‘walk forwards’ option is not available with the Access controller, unless using an additional interface, such as the OneSwitch Walk Box peripheral. 

The 19-switch DualSense interface is shown in focus amongst cables from switches connected to it and an Access controller which is out of focus in the foreground.

Summary

The OneSwitch 19-switch DualSense interface is a way to supplement the features of the Access controller, when there are not enough 3.5 mm ports on an Access controller (four ports), or two paired Access controllers (8 ports) for a particular player.

It can also be used as a ‘standalone’ set-up alongside accessibility switches, when a player may not benefit from the buttons or joysticks on an Access controller, but requires more than eight controller inputs to be accessed using switches and is able to use some of the inputs on a DualSense controller alongside these. If eight or fewer switches are required, they may consider pairing one or two Access controllers with a standard DualSense controller. 

The 19-switch DualSense interface can also be paired with another DualSense controller using the PlayStation 5 console’s ‘Use Assist Controller’ option. This can allow a player to split and use different inputs on the controller with different parts of their body, or play alongside a second player to control one player in-game.

For more information on accessing a PS5 console using alternative controllers, please use the ‘PS5 Access‘ tag on the GameAccess site. For more information on using switches to access games, please use the ‘Switches‘ sub-category under the ‘Equipment’ category.


Equipment shown in this post:

19-switch DualSense interface: https://www.oneswitch.org.uk/art.php?id=367 

Logitech G Adaptive Kit for Access controller: https://gameaccess.info/logitech-g-adaptive-gaming-kit-for-access-controller/

Celtic Magic J3 Light Force Joystick: https://gameaccess.info/low-force-joysticks-and-switches/

Access controller: https://gameaccess.info/playstation-5-access-controller-video-an-introductory-look/ 

How to set up an assist controller on PS5: https://www.playstation.com/en-gb/support/hardware/second-controller-assistance/ 

Logitech G Adaptive Gaming Kit for Access Controller

Photo showing the box for the Logitech G Adaptive Gaming Kit for Access Controller next to an Access controller.

The Logitech G Adaptive Gaming Kit for Access Controller (shown above, right) has now been released in the UK. The kit is a peripheral for the PS5’s Access controller (shown above, left) – a customisable controller that includes an integrated analog stick and 10 buttons. It also includes four 3.5 mm ports that allow you to connect accessibility switches or compatible analog sticks, allowing players to position inputs where they are most accessible for them. The Logitech Gaming Kit includes a range of compatible buttons and triggers that can be used as accessibility switches and connected via these ports.

The kit follows Logitech G’s original Adaptive Gaming Kit, that was launched in 2019 as a peripheral for the Xbox Adaptive Controller. The difference between the two kits is the number of included buttons and boards, along with the console-specific variation of the included stickers.

Photo showing a close up of the 3.5mm ports with four connected switches.
Photo showing anAccess controller with one of each of the four Logitech G switches on the Logitech G board. the switches are connected to the Access controller and have stickers on them for Square, Triangle, L2 and R2.

The kit includes eight buttons and triggers in total, a rigid hook and loop board, stickers to label the switches, hook stickers for the rear of the switches to connect them to the board (or other receptive surfaces) and some hook and loop cable ties. 

Photo showing everything in the kit out of the box, including 8 switches, a sheet of hook stickers for the switches, a sheet of cable ties, two sheets of button label stickers and one board.

There are x2 ‘light touch buttons’ (actuation force: 59 g), x2 ‘small buttons’ (actuation force: 56 g), x2 ‘large buttons’ (actuation force: 101 g) and x2 ‘variable triggers’ (actuation force: 104 g).

The variable triggers allow you to apply a variable level of input for in-game actions such as Gas in a driving game. You can use one of the other Logitech G buttons for trigger inputs with the Access controller. However, as these are digital, they will be on/off, not variable, so will hold the trigger input down fully when pressed.

Photo showing a close up of the adaptive trigger switch attached to a Logitech G board with other switches blurred in the background.

The chosen switches, once connected to the Access controller, are mapped to the input you would like using the PlayStation 5’s Access controller ‘Profile Library’ software. You can map button or trigger inputs, such as Cross, R3, L2 etc. to one of the 3.5 mm inputs, labelled as E1, E2, E3 and E4, but not for analog stick directions (e.g. Up on Left Stick) or a directional swipe on the touchpad.

Photo close up of the profile creation screen showing the E1 mapped to R2, E2 mapped to Triangle, E3 mapped to L2 and E4 mapped to Square.

For more information on creating a profile for the Access controller, please see our recent video: https://gameaccess.info/playstation-5-access-controller-video-an-introductory-look/ 

An additional four 3.5 mm switch or compatible analog stick inputs can be added by purchasing and pairing another Access controller to be used alongside your primary Access controller. You can also pair a DualSense controller alongside one or two Access controllers if you are able to use some of the input on that alongside an Access controller, or want to play alongside another player cooperatively in-game.

If more 3.5 mm switch ports for digital buttons are needed, you could also purchase and use a switch-modified DualSense, such as those modified by Evil Controllers or OneSwitch, and pair it with one or two Access controllers.

Alternative 3.5 mm accessibility switches are also available, which are also compatible with the Access controller, such as those that are lighter to activate. For more information on these and information on using switches for playing video games more widely, please use the ‘Switches‘ category on the site. 

Finally, for more details on the Logitech G Adaptive Gaming Kit for Access Controller, please visit their store page.

Jusant | Gameplay Accessibility Options

Screenhot of the Jusant accessibility Menu's Gameplay section, showing 5 of the 6 Options onscreen.

Jusant [PEGI 3] is an ‘action-puzzle climbing game and a meditative journey to the top of a tall tower’.  The developer, Don’t Nod, states, ‘Challenge yourself at your own pace, explore different paths, and unravel the secrets from a bygone civilization.’ It is available on Xbox Series S/X, PS5 and PC.

The game includes a range of accessibility options added in a post-launch accessibility update patch at the end of November 2023. The additional options include those found in the Gameplay section of the Accessibility menu. Changing these settings may enable players to: 

  • reduce the number of control inputs required
  • reduce the frequency of the use of certain control inputs
  • reduce the amount of ‘holds’ of certain control inputs
  • reduce the number of inputs used simultaneously

In this post, we will go through these options and their settings and explain how they will affect the control inputs required in gameplay.

We will focus on using a controller in this post, but keyboard and mouse controls are also supported by the game, for players on Windows PC.  

As an introduction before we go into a little more detail on each setting, below is a side-by-side video comparison demonstrating the controls when some of these options, assists and modes are in use, compared with when not:

In the video above, the Button and Trigger inputs will show up as white on the controller overlay when in use and the Left Stick will move when in use.

The video shows how the Trigger inputs are repeatedly used whilst climbing with default settings compared with when using the ‘Simplified’ Climbing Mode. It also shows how the Right Trigger is used to grab when you jump to a ‘hold’ in default settings compared with when using the Jump Assistance, where this is not required. Finally, it shows how the Bumper inputs are used for Rappelling when using the default settings compared with when using the ‘Alternate’ Rappel Mode. Please read on for more detail on each of these settings.

Gameplay Accessibility Settings

You can locate these settings in Main Menu or Pause Menu > Settings > Accessibility and you will find them in the first section under ‘Gameplay’.

Climbing Mode 

In ‘Default’ mode, you use the Left Stick to move your free hand and search for a hold. Left Trigger is held to grip a hold with your left hand and Right Trigger to grip one with your right. You release these inputs to release the grip. As you ascend you constantly alternate between holding the Left and Right Trigger along with using Left Stick to reach. If you let go of both Triggers, you will fall. In ‘Default’ mode, you will also need to hold the input (B button on Xbox and Circle on PlayStation) to release your rope from a fixing point for approximately 0.8 seconds.

Choosing ‘Simplifiedremoves the need to use the Left and Right Triggers to grip a hold with your left and right hands. You just need to use Left Stick for movement direction and one initial press of the Right Trigger to reach up and grip to start your ascent or one press on the Left Trigger to release your grip (e.g. if you want to drop down onto a surface). Using ‘Simplified’ climbing mode also means that you do not need to hold down the carabiner inputs e.g. to detach your rope from a fixing point or to wind in your rope. Choosing ‘Simplified’ also changes your Rest input for regaining stamina to D-pad Down (from Left Stick Click). See Stamina Mode option below for turning this off. 

Screenshot showing the main character climbing the stem of a giant vine-like plant against a backdrop of rock face and mountain peaks down below.

Jump Assistance

This assist is only activated when Climbing Mode is set to ‘Simplified’. NB – the Jump Assistance will say ‘Yes’ when in ‘Default’ climbing mode, but it is greyed out and will not actually be active. When inactive (greyed out) or set to ‘Off’, you will need to grab using the Left or Right Trigger when you jump and reach a ‘hold’ or ledge. 

When the assist is set to ‘Yes‘, you will automatically grab a ledge or hold when jumping to it. 

Invert Hold and Release

This option is again only available if using ‘Simplified’ climbing mode and will be greyed out if in ‘Default’ climbing mode. ‘No‘ by default means that the Right Trigger is used to grab a hold to start climbing and the Left Trigger is used to release.

When set to ‘Yes‘, you use the Left Trigger to grab a hold, and use Right Trigger to release to drop down instead.

Rappel Mode

Using the ‘Default‘ setting, you need to hold Left Bumper down to descend down the rope when hanging and Right Bumper to ascend it.

When using the ‘Alternate‘ setting, you can hold the Left Stick Down to descend and Left Stick Up to ascend. You can also tap the Right Bumper once to toggle ascend (you will continue ascending until you tap Right Bumper again). To enter and exit Rappel Mode when using the ‘Alternate’ option, you tap the Left Bumper once to toggle between the modes. This allows you to exit the mode to swing back and forth on your rope instead (again using the Left Stick).

Screenshot showing the main character rappelling down a rock face past a giant vine-like plant. The onscreen prompts show a Left Stick Up and Down  prompt for 'Go Down and Go up'.

Stamina Mode

By default this is set to ‘Yes‘ which is means it is on and you can therefore run out of stamina climbing (particularly in the sun) when jumping. You then need to press Left Stick Click to regain your stamina before continuing. If you set this to ‘No’, you have infinite stamina and do not need to press Left Stick Click to regain it.

Interaction Mode

This is set to ‘Default‘ as standard, which means that you need to briefly hold down a combination of inputs at the same time to interact with altars and handles. You hold the Left and Right Trigger down together briefly, whilst moving the Left Stick towards the left or right, depending on the the onscreen prompt. 

When changed to ‘Simplified‘, you only need to press the Left and Right Trigger inputs down together momentarily, instead. You do not also need to move the Left Stick. 

Screenshot showing the main character in front of a handle mechanism with onscreen prompts showing LT and RT for an Xbox controller.

The video below demonstrates examples of some of the options described above, that are found in the Gameplay Accessibility menu. It shows the controls in use when using the default options and when using the accessibility options:

In the video above, the Button and Trigger inputs will show up as white on the controller overlay when in use and the Left Stick will move when in use.

Additional Options

Below are some additional options found in the game, that may also improve the motor accessibility of the game for players:

Auto-follow Camera

Under the Camera section of the Accessibility Menu (Settings>Accessibility>Camera), is the ‘Auto-follow Camera’ option. It is already set to ‘Yes‘ as standard, so the camera will automatically position itself behind your character more often, by default. It does not stick directly behind you, so you will still often need to use the Right Stick to position the camera  manually when turning and also to look around and plan climbing routes, but you do not have to do this simultaneously whilst using the Left Stick.

If you choose ‘No‘, you will have full manual control of the camera position, instead. 

Camera Controls

In the Controls menu (Main Menu>Settings>Controls>Camera) the horizontal and vertical axes’ sensitivity can be adjusted for the camera (Right Stick input). You can also invert both the horizontal and vertical axes independently of each other, here, for Right Stick input. 

Above these options is the ‘mouse-led’ sensitivity setting if playing with keyboard and mouse (Main Menu>Settings>Controls>Mouse-led Camera).

Movement Controls

Also in the Controls menu (Menu>Settings>Controls>Movement), you can alter the sensitivity of the horizontal and vertical axes for Movement (Left Stick input). As with camera controls, you can also invert both the horizontal and vertical axes independently of each other, here, for Left Stick input. 

Keyboard/Mouse and Controller Layouts

At the bottom of the movement controls section, you can also invert the rappel controls and alter the controller vibration incrementally and turn it off. Below that is the keyboard and mouse input configuration menu and also the controller input layout graphic. 

You can reconfigure the inputs if using a keyboard and mouse and you also have the option to stack them using up to two different inputs for the same action if it is useful to alternate them, depending on the context in-game. 

The controller inputs cannot be remapped. If you need to do remap them, you can do it at system level on Xbox Series and PS5 consoles, but this will not alter the in-game input prompts onscreen. The default controller inputs are shown in the first image below. The layout will be altered slightly based on the accessibility options chosen (see second image):

Screenshot of the controller input layout of an Xbox controller.
Default controller input layout

Controller input layout with Gameplay Accessibility options in use 

We hope that this post has been useful. For more information of the accessibility features found in other titles, please use the ‘Games‘ category of the site.


Developer Resource:

SpecialEffect DevKit logo

For more video examples of how developers have improved the motor accessibility of their games, please visit https://specialeffectdevkit.info/

Examples of how other games have approached creating solutions to those found in the Gameplay Accessibility options in Jusant, can be found in the following modules of the SpecialEffect DevKit:

1. Climbing Mode > ‘Simplified’:

    • Using the ‘Simplified’ setting for the Climbing Mode option removes the need to hold down an input for a set duration to detach or wind up your rope. More examples of games that ‘let players modify interactions that require holding an input for a specific amount of time’, can be found in the following DevKit module: 3.4    Set Duration Holds

    • Using this setting also removes the need for continuous and repeated holds of the Triggers when climbing. Other games that ‘provide alternative options for actions that require an input to be continuously held’, are shown in: 3.3    Continuous Holds

    • The setting also reduces the number of inputs required when climbing from Left Trigger, Right Trigger and Left Stick, to just Left Stick. Other games that ‘offer players alternative ways to perform actions’, can be found in: 7.2    Alternative Actions

2. Jump Assistance > ‘Yes’:

    • When ‘Yes’ is applied for the Jump Assistance option, this removes the need to time the press a grab input when jumping to a hold point. Other games that ‘let players reduce or remove the need for quick or precisely timed movements’, can be viewed in: 6.4    Timing Elements

    • Selecting ‘Yes’ also removes the need to use an input to grab in the context of jumping. ‘Examples of how developers have been able to ‘allow players to automate certain digital actions’, can be found in the game examples used in: 7.3    Automatic Digital Actions

3. Rappel Mode > ‘Alternate’:

    • Choosing ‘Alternate’ for the Rappel Mode option also removes the need to hold a button (Bumper) input down, instead using the Up and Down directions which is already used by the player in other contexts during the game. Other titles that ‘provide alternative options for actions that require an input to be continuously held’, can be found in: 3.3    Continuous Holds

    • The ‘Alternate’ option also removes the need for use of the Bumper inputs to climb and descend the rope by offering alternative actions when rappelling to just the Left Stick, which is already used by the player in other contexts during the game. Other games in which developers have been able to ‘offer players alternative ways to perform actions’, are shown in: 7.2    Alternative Actions

Xbox Adaptive Controller Joysticks | Video

Show Transcript

In this video, we are going to look at the different analog sticks that we use here at SpecialEffect, with the Xbox Adaptive Controller.

The Xbox Adaptive Controller, which we call the XAC, is a controller interface. It allows you to create a customised controller by adding appropriate analog sticks and accessibility switches.

Analog sticks can be connected via the USB ports or via the 3.5mm jacks, whilst accessibility switches can only be connected via the 3.5mm jacks.

By default, plugging into the left USB, the stick will act as Left Stick in-game. Alternatively, plugging it into the right USB, the stick will act as Right Stick in-game. If using the 3.5mm jacks, plugging it into the X1 socket will make the stick act as Left Stick in-game, and plugging it into the X2 socket, the stick will act as Right Stick in-game.

In the following sections, we will look at standard-force analog sticks, low-force analog sticks and large analog sticks, as well as different ways of mounting these.

If using the thumbsticks on a standard controller is preferable, you can pair your controller to the Xbox Adaptive Controller using Microsoft’s Copilot feature.

Other compatible analog sticks are available, but we will just be focusing on the ones that we use here at SpecialEffect.

Standard-Force Analog Sticks

‘Standard-force analog sticks’ are what we label analog sticks that have a standard resistance level to the thumbsticks on a standard controller.

These types of analog sticks are available in their own housing to use with the XAC. On a standard controller they are in a fixed position. However, when they are in their own separate housing they can be mounted and positioned somewhere else where the individual can more easily use them, such as by the chin, by the foot or in a custom position by the hand.

The ‘XAC Mini Stick’ is made by a company called OneSwitch, which is based in the UK. These joysticks come with a USB connection as standard. However, they can also be made with a 3.5mm jack connection. When using the USB connection, they plug into either the left or the right USB on the XAC, depending on which joystick you want them to act as.

The housing for this joystick comes in a 6.5cm square box. This can be useful for positioning switches on. This model is also available as a low-force version which we will talk about later in this video.

There are currently 3 varieties of the ‘Celtic Magic Mini Joysticks’. These are J1, J2 and J3.

The different versions will have different bases and mounting options. They are all compatible with the XAC using a 3.5mm jack that plugs into X1 or X2 along the back of the XAC. At SpecialEffect we use the J2 and J3 versions of these joysticks.

The J3 ‘Compact Version’ has a slightly smaller base than the J2, and it is also slightly tilted forwards. Some users might find this angled position easier to access. The J3 also has the option to add a camera mount to it.

The J2 ‘Desktop version’ has a larger base than the J3, so it may feel sturdier when mounted on a flat surface. This analog stick is also completely flat which some users may prefer.

There are low-force versions of these analog sticks available which we will talk about later in this video.

This ‘Mini XAC Thumbstick’ is from Evil Controllers who are based in the US. This analog stick comes with a 3.5mm jack which plugs into either X1 or X2 on the XAC, depending on what you want your joystick to act as.

This analog stick either comes with a flat base, which can be mounted on a flat surface, or with a curved base, which can be attached to the arm of a controller, which some people find useful for single-handed play.

We also use standard Xbox controllers with players who can use the thumbsticks in their standard position on the controller. We sometimes mount the controller to use with a different part of the body, such as by the person’s hand, feet or chin. We will often connect these standard controllers to the XAC using Xbox’s Copilot feature. This enables the individual to potentially use external switches or analog sticks alongside the standard controller. More information on the Copilot feature will be shown at the end of this video.

Low-Force Analog Sticks

Sometimes a person may find that they need game control inputs that require less force to use. There are a variety of analog sticks, compatible with the XAC, which require less force than those shown in the previous section.

OneSwitch also offer a low-force version of their XAC Mini Stick discussed in the previous section. It is available with a range of custom toppers to suit your needs.

The low-force version requires about half as much force as the standard version. Again, the housing can also be used for mounting switches.

These joysticks come with a USB connection to connect them to the XAC. A 3.5 mm jack version is available that can plug into either the X1 or the X2 ports of the XAC. However, this is not recommended by OneSwitch.

The Celtic Magic ‘Light-Force Mini Joysticks’ are a low-force version of the Celtic Magic joysticks we looked at earlier. This modification requires only a third of the force to activate it, compared to a standard-force option. Again, 3 versions of the base are available: the J1, the J2 and the J3. At SpecialEffect we tend to use the J2 and J3 versions.

They come with a 3.5mm jack which can be plugged into either the X1 or the X2 port on the XAC, depending on whether you want to use it for the Left Stick or the Right Stick. The ‘J2 Desktop Version’ comes with a larger base which may make it easier to mount in certain situations.

The J3 joystick has a smaller base and is angled towards the user, which some people may find easier to use with a hand or finger. The smaller housing can be useful when there is limited space, or when you are using multiple accessibility switches and a second joystick. The J3 also has the option to add a camera mount which adds 8 mm of height.

The Feather Hyper-Light-Force Joystick is from Celtic Magic. This is compatible with the XAC using the USB ports on either the left or the right side. You can adjust the sensitivity using the included magnets. It is the most sensitive analog joystick we use at SpeciaEffect. It comes with a variety of stands and different toppers. While mounting this joystick, you need to consider this taller profile. Because it’s so sensitive, we tend to mount it using a mounting arm, a tray, or a table to position it under your finger. Some people try to use their chin or their lips to control this joystick. However, because it’s so sensitive, it’s not always easy to get accurate control.

For those who can use a standard Xbox One controller but find the thumbsticks too difficult to move, OneSwitch have modified a controller to make the joysticks lighter. The controller can have the rumble packs removed, which makes the controller lighter to hold. Some of the buttons can be made lower force and the analog springs can be replaced with springs that require less force.

These replacement springs have about a third of the standard resistance. Thumbstick extensions can also be added to these controllers for more leverage. However, this will result in needing to move the joystick further to activate it.

Since the modified controllers still register as standard controllers, they can be used in Copilot Mode for Xbox and Microsoft options. Copilot Mode enables you to use two controllers together to control one player.

In Copilot Mode, an XAC can be used as the second controller. This facilitates additional external joystick or switch access. More information on setting up Copilot Mode will be shown at the end of this video.

The Glidepoint Joysticks from SevenMileMountain offer analog control, without resistance from a joystick spring. Instead, they are a glidepad style capacitive touch interface. You slide your finger over the surface to activate an input. For instance, if you move it to the right of centre you move to the right in the game. Move it left, and you will move left. The MK3b model enables you to hold down your finger and move in any direction, or tap in any direction, to move the character in-game.

Large Analog Sticks

There are a range of large analog joysticks that might be suitable for people with large gross movements and struggle to access the joysticks on a regular gamepad. This could be due to their small size and the amount of resistance needed to move them.

So the UltraStik is a large joystick that plugs into the left or right USB port on the XAC. As standard, it comes with a ball topper but can also come with a MERU topper as well. This model is from OneSwitch and it comes in a landscape orientation, but it can come in a portrait orientation, if requested. It has quite a short throw distance for its size, so some players may find they need more travel for the stick. This is to have more ranged control over their game. However, we often use it for football games, kart racing games and platformers.

So the Zik-Zak Large Joystick is similar to the UltraStik. This is in terms of its footprint size but it also comes in a lower profile format. It is also used in portrait orientation instead of landscape as standard.

The distance of the throw of the sticks is also quite different. You have a larger throw than an UltraStik. This means some players have more room for control over how much force they apply and consequently the control they have using it. It also comes in either a metal or a plastic casing. It comes with a range of toppers, such as a ball shape, an acorn shape, and an elongated topper. Golf ball and Meru T-bar toppers are also an option.

The Zik-Zak can be customised when ordering to reduce the force required to move it. This is to make it more than 8 times lighter to move it. A firmer spring can be requested. The Zik-Zak is also available in smaller housing, if you need to find a smaller space for it, called a Zik-Zak Mini.

The Pretorian Optima Joystick has a similar throw to the Zik-Zak than the UltraStik in terms of distance, but also has less resistance than the Zik-Zak. It is described as having a ‘light touch movement’. It comes with a variety of toppers, including a foam ball topper, an acorn topper, and a small T-bar topper, and the case it comes in is also angled.

To switch between the Xbox and Mouse modes you hold the top two buttons, which act as Left and Right Click, for 12 seconds.

Mounting

In this section we are going to have a look at the different ways that we mount analog sticks. Regardless of the type of analog stick that a person might be using, many of the people that we work with need them mounted in a very specific way to make sure that they can use it comfortably, safely and effectively.

For some people, this can involve securing their analog stick down onto a flat tray. This can be especially helpful for people who need the analog stick secured down onto a flat table, or a wheelchair tray. We tend to use trays with a loop Velcro surface, and then then secure the analog stick down by using hook Velcro on the base of the stick. Some people may benefit from using a non-slip material, such as Dycem, between the flat surface of the tray and the table that they wish to position the tray onto. This can be especially true for people who have strong or involuntary movements, which may mean that the analog stick or the tray may move unintentionally. The flat trays that we tend to use to mount analog sticks are either ‘Maxess trays’, or the small rigid trays that come with the Logitech Adaptive Gaming Kits.

If a person isn’t going to be sat at a table, or doesn’t use a wheelchair tray, then we may use a laptray. We use the Trabasack Curve Connect. This is a laptray with a loop Velcro-style surface. We would then put hook Velcro on the base of the analog stick to help hold it in place on the Trabasack.

If a person needs an analog stick in a very specific position to be able to play, we will often use a Manfrotto Variable Friction Arm. This can be a helpful method if someone needs their analog stick in a similar position to their powered wheelchair joystick, or if they are going to be using an analog stick by their chin. The arms provide flexibility in terms of analog stick positioning but they’re also strong enough to help keep them in place.

We use the Manfrotto Super Clamp to help hold the arm into position. We tend to use 3M ‘Dual Lock’ on the base of the analog stick, and also on a mounting plate which helps secure a firm connection.

For smaller analog sticks, we use these small, round mounting plates, which are called ‘Mounting Plate for Lib Switch’. For larger analog sticks, we would usually use large triangular mounting plates.

Copilot Feature

To connect two controllers to use the analog sticks from both devices to control one player, you can use Copilot. Copilot is a feature that allows you to combine the inputs of two compatible controllers. This is so that either two people can play alongside each other to play one player in-game, or so that one person can divide their control inputs between two separate controllers.

To use Copilot on your Xbox One or Xbox Series S or X console, go to ‘My games & apps’ on your Xbox Home screen. Navigate across to the Xbox Accessories app and open it.

Turn on the controllers you would like to Copilot by pressing the Xbox button on each controller. The connected controllers will then appear in the app.

To turn on Copilot, go to one of the controllers you have selected for Copilot, then navigate to the three dots icon below and select it.

From the options that appear, go to ‘Turn on Copilot’ and select it. Now the two controllers are connected, so you can leave the app and play a game. These controllers will remain co-piloted even when the console has been turned off and on again, until you turn Copilot off by returning to the app and navigating to your Copilot controller to turn it off.

Alternatively, Copilot can be turned off by holding down the Xbox button until a menu shows up that says ‘Turn off Copilot’. Navigate to this option and select it.

On Windows 10 and 11 on PC, you can download the Xbox Accessories app from the Microsoft store.

For more information on the Xbox Adaptive Controller and compatible devices, please visit GameAccess.info.

In this video, SpecialEffect OT’s Frankie, Nomi, Jacob and Joe are going to look at the different analog joysticks that we use at SpecialEffect, with the Xbox Adaptive Controller (XAC).

The XAC is a controller interface that lets you create a customised controller by adding appropriate joysticks and accessibility switches.

For more information on the Xbox Adaptive Controller and the devices that can be used with it, please use the XAC tag on the GameAccess site.

Timestamps:

0:00 | Introduction

1:19 | Standard-Force Analog Sticks

4:12 | Low-Force Analog Sticks

8:12 | Large Analog Sticks

10:14 | Mounting

12:28 | Copilot Feature 


Joystick Links (unaffiliated):

Standard-Force Analog Sticks:

(1:50)  XAC Mini Stick (OneSwitch): https://oneswitch.org.uk/page/xacministick

(2:23) Mini Joystick (Celtic Magic): https://www.celticmagic.org/xac-buying-options

(3:17) XAC Mini Thumbstick (Evil Controllers): https://www.evilcontrollers.com/mini-xac-thumbstick

(3:44)  Xbox Wireless Controller: https://www.xbox.com/en-GB/accessories/controllers/xbox-wireless-controller

Low-Force Analog Sticks:

(4:28) Light Spring XAC Mini Stick (One Switch): https://www.oneswitch.org.uk/art.php?id=270

(5:01)  Light Force Joysticks (Celtic Magic): https://www.celticmagic.org/xac-buying-options

(6:02)  Feather Joystick (Celtic Magic): https://www.celticmagic.org/feather

(6:51) Lightweight Xbox One/S/X Controller (OneSwitch) : https://www.oneswitch.org.uk/art.php?id=284

(7:43)  Glidepoint Joystick MK3b for XAC (SevenMileMountain) : https://www.etsy.com/uk/listing/1480919209/glidepoint-joystick-mk3b-for-xbox?click_key=a3589b781ca2572d4de77f61361af8401e0cef70%3A1480919209&click_sum=fdccb785&ref=shop_home_feat_2&sts=1

Large Analog Sticks:

(8:33) UltraStik (OneSwitch): https://oneswitch.org.uk/page/shop-ultra-stik

(8:59) Zik-Zak Large Joystick (OneSwitch) https://oneswitch.org.uk/page/zikzakstick

(9:41_ Zik-Zak Mini Joystick (OneSwitch): https://oneswitch.org.uk/page/zikzakmini

(9:53) Optima Joystick (Pretorian Technologies): https://www.pretorianuk.com/optima-joystick


Video by Tom Williams.

Forza Motorsport Braking, Throttle and Steering Assists

Forza Motorsport [PEGI 3] includes a wide range of options for players to customise how they play the game and potentially improve the motor accessibility of the game. In this post, we are going to go through the Braking, Throttle and Steering Assists found in the Driving Assists menu. The game is available on Xbox Series S/X consoles and Windows PC. We will be mainly focussing on using a controller to play, though the game can also be played using a keyboard or compatible steering wheel.

Whilst there are many actions in the game that take up most of the available buttons or stick directions on a controller, the required core inputs to race are Steering (left and right directions on the Left Stick by default), Brake (LT by default) and Gas (RT by default) to control the throttle. The keyboard inputs for these actions are W,A,S and D, by default.

The assists you choose to use can reduce these core controls further still. These assists can allow you to reduce the amount of inputs you use and/or the frequency you need to use them to play. Some assist settings may just allow you to use a certain input less frequently, or they can be customised to remove the need to use one or more of the inputs entirely. For instance, you could choose to use the Assisted Throttle setting so you can focus on steering and braking, or you could use Fully Assisted steering and braking, so you just control the throttle.  The driving assists can be used in single-player races such as in Free Play or Career Mode and also Featured Multiplayer events online. 

We will go through each of these options and share the developer’s descriptions of these, which will explain each of the settings you can choose from. We will finish by showing examples of gameplay, using different combinations of these particular assists to give an idea of the control inputs required whilst using them.

*Update 22/12/23 – We have added a video about the Braking, Throttle and Steering driving assist here: https://gameaccess.info/forza-motorsport-braking-throttle-steering-assists-video/

Global Assists Presets

The Global Assists Presets option allows you to adjust multiple assists by changing just one setting. The available settings are Maximum Assists, Heavy Assists, Moderate Assists, Balanced Assists, Light Assists and Minimum Assists. You can then customise each of these presets, to tailor the settings to you. The default setting is Heavy Assists, which is suggested when starting the game.

Braking Assist Settings

This option sets the amount of support you will get with braking and will alter how much you will need to use the Brake input (LT by default) yourself. You can still apply the brake manually at any point if using one of the assists. The following settings are available to choose from:

  • Fully Assisted: When a driver approaches a corner, this system automatically applies the necessary level of brakes to get the driver through the turn. In addition, this system applies brakes in certain circumstances to help avoid rear-ending other cars. NOTE: This can make it more challenging to pass other cars.
  • Partially Assisted: When a driver approaches a corner, this system automatically applies the necessary level of brakes to get the driver through the turn.
  • ABS On: When a driver applies the brakes, this system pulses the brakes to ensure that they don’t lock up.
  • ABS Off: The driver is in full control of the braking force. If the brakes are applied with too much force, they will lock up. As drivers master braking, they will find this option can lead to faster races.

Throttle Assist Settings

This option allows you to choose whether you will use the Gas input yourself (RT by default) or allow this to be applied automatically. You can still use the Gas input to control the throttle manually, to supplement this action. The following settings are available to choose from:

  • Assisted: When not needing to slow down for a corner, this system automatically applies throttle, so the driver doesn’t need to hold the input constantly, reducing muscle tension and fatigue.
  • Unassisted: The driver has full control of the throttle.

Steering Assist Settings

This assist allows you to choose how much support you will receive with Steering from full control (using L Stick by default), to not needing to use the input at all.

  • Fully Assisted: provides strong guidance to help the car stay near the Suggested Line. Note that this has no effect when using a Force Feedback input device.
  • Partially Assisted: provides some guidance to the driver’s steering, but only when necessary. Note that this has no effect when using a Force Feedback input device.
  • Normal: gives the driver full control over steering but dampens certain physical effects to make driving easier.
  • Simulation: eliminates any damping and steering speed assistance for a more realistic effect, making counter-steering much quicker. NOTE: This mode is difficult with a controller and is recommended for advanced drivers.

Gameplay Examples

The below video shows some examples of the Steering, Throttle and Braking assists in use during gameplay and examples of how a player may use the core Steering, Gas (Throttle) and Brake controls alongside these. Please note, different tracks, difficulty levels, offline or online opponents and personal driving styles will affect how many and how frequently certain inputs are used. 

The onscreen controller shows how the Steering (Left Stick), Gas ( RT – to control the throttle) and Brake (LT) inputs are being used whilst using the Steering, Braking and Throttle driving assists.

0:00 | Heavy Assists Preset – Player is shown controlling the throttle, steering (Partially Assisted) and occasionally braking (Partially Assisted) to avoid collisions.

0:52 | Fully Assisted Braking – Player is shown controlling the throttle and steering (Partially Assisted).

1:55 | Assisted Throttle + Fully Assisted Braking – Player is shown steering (Partially Assisted) and briefly using the throttle on an open part of track to gain additional speed. 

3:56 | Maximum Assists Preset – Player is shown just controlling the throttle, whilst not using inputs for steering and braking (both Fully Assisted).

5:33 | Assisted Throttle + Fully Assisted Steering – Player is shown controlling braking (ABS On) and steering (Fully Assisted) just to overtake. 

Additional Related Settings

Screenshot of Difficulty menu screen.
  • Remapping Controller/Keyboard Layouts  – There are 15 controller layouts to choose from. These can be customised by remapping the individual inputs used for different actions. All actions can be remapped to all inputs on a controller, including swapping actions between analog and digital inputs and being able to remap individual stick directions to different actions. There are also five keyboard layouts, which can also be remapped to swap individual actions to keys of your choice.
  • Deadzones – ‘Inside’ and ‘outside’ deadzone options are available for actions that are analog, like steering and acceleration. For instance, for steering using an analog stick, if you decrease the inside deadzone, less movement of the stick is required for the car to start turning. Increasing it, more movement is required before it will start turning. Decreasing the outside deadzone for steering will mean that less input is needed to reach the full activation (full turn), whilst increasing it will mean more movement is required. 
  • Car-to-Car Collisions – This can be set to ‘Off’ to drive through cars instead of colliding. This setting can be found in the Accessibility menu within the Blind Driving Assists options and is only applied during single-player events.
  • Drivatar Difficulty – You can choose the difficulty of the AI opponents in single player races from the Difficulty menu, which affects their precision when braking, cornering and using the throttle.
  • Rewind – When playing single player with Club rules or Sport Rules, you are able to use the Rewind option (Y button or R key by default) to go back in time before a mistake has been made, such as colliding with another car or coming off the track.

We hope that this post has been useful in sharing how gameplay can be customised using the Steering, Braking and Throttle driving assists in Forza Motorsport. For information on additional driving assists, customisable options and accessibility features, please visit the Turn 10 article about Forza Motorsport Accessibility Support: https://support.forzamotorsport.net/hc/en-us/articles/20964254277267-Forza-Motorsport-Accessibility-Support  

Developer Resource:

SpecialEffect DevKit logo

For more video examples of how developers have improved the motor accessibility of their games, please visit https://specialeffectdevkit.info/

More information for developers interested in further examples showing similar features to those demonstrated in the Forza Motorsport above, can be found in the following modules of the SpecialEffect DevKit:

PS5 Alternative Access Methods Roundup

Photo showing a Cronus Zen connected to a PS5 console. Into the Zen is plugged a DuelSense controller and an Xbox Adaptive Controller. Into that is plugged a number of switches and two joysticks.
Photo showing a Cronus Zen connected to a PS5 console. Into the Zen is plugged a DuelSense controller and an Xbox controller.

We have recently added some articles and videos to the GameAccess site that show different methods of using an alternative controller to play PlayStation 5 (PS5) games on a PS5 console, when someone is unable to use a PS5 DualSense controller. 

This article will share all of these methods in one place and link to the original articles for further reading. The transcripts below each video can also be opened to help follow instructions.

At the time of publishing this, these methods are allowing us to play PS5 games on the console with a range of alternative controllers. However, future device or console updates may alter this, so players must follow these methods at their own risk. 

In addition to the methods below, Sony have announced the PlayStation 5 Access Controller which will be released on 6 December 2023, which may be a suitable and first-party supported alternative for some players.

Contents

Method 1. Cronus Zen + Titan Two (for one or two alternative controllers on PS5)

Method 2. Besavior + Titan Two (for one or two alternative controllers on PS5)

Method 3. Cronus Zen (for one alternative controller on PS5)

Method 4. Besavior (for one alternative controller on PS5 (XAC not compatible))

Method 5. PS Remote Play + Titan Two (for one or two alternative controllers on PS5)

Method 6. PS Remote Play + reWASD (for one or two alternative controllers on PS5)


Method 1. Cronus Zen + Titan Two (for one or two alternative controllers on PS5)

*Update 25/01/24* – Unfortunately, the latest PS5 Update (24.01-08.60.00) stops the Cronus Zen device from functioning, so this set-up is not currently working. It will, however, still work if you have not yet carried out the (optional) update.

This method uses two adapters (a Cronus Zen and a Titan Two) to enable two alternative controllers to be used simultaneously. This could be a DualShock 4 controller or an Xbox One or Series controller alongside an Xbox Adaptive Controller (XAC), for instance. The Cronus Zen allows you to use one alternative controller on the PS5 console, whilst the Titan Two enables you to add an additional controller to use two alternative controllers simultaneously.

Set-up video:

Please note, the LEDs on the Cronus Zen, Titan Two and the Xbox Adaptive Controller will appear differently in person to how they appear on-screen.
Show Transcript

Some of the people we work with are unable to use a DualSense controller that is required to play many PlayStation 5 games.

In this video, we will look at how to set up a Cronus Zen and a Titan Two to use alternative controllers like an Xbox Adaptive Controller (also known as an XAC) or DualShock 4 controller to play PlayStation 5 games on a PlayStation 5 console.

You can plug compatible controllers like an Xbox Adaptive Controller or DualShock 4 into the Cronus Zen directly, but using the Titan Two allows us to use two controllers simultaneously to play.

For instance, we may use a DualShock 4 controller as the main controller, but we use an XAC alongside it to use some accessibility switches. Or you may use joysticks and switches via the Xbox Adaptive Controller for most controls but have the DualShock 4 ready to use for any touchpad or Sixaxis parts of games.

The PlayStation 5’s DualSense, whilst connected as part of the set-up to verify the Cronus Zen, cannot be used for controls.

Using the Titan Two also allows you to use Titan Two scripts that may improve accessibility for you and also gives you the option to connect a PC to add certain controls, such as voice control.

We will go through setting up each of the pieces of equipment, then show how to connect them all to play.

Step 1. PlayStation 5 Console Settings

You will need to make sure your PlayStation 5 console is set so that controllers are used via a USB cable and not via Bluetooth.

To do this, in the PlayStation Home menu, navigate to ‘Settings’, select ‘Accessories’, go into ‘Controller’, then select ‘Communication Method’ and set it to ‘Use USB Cable’ instead of ‘Use Bluetooth’.

Step 2. Set Up the Cronus Zen

Download the software currently in beta from beta.cronusmax.com/ps5-beta and unzip the folder.

Open the ‘cm update tool’ file from the downloaded and unzipped folder to open the ‘Collective Minds Firmware Update Tool’ and connect the Cronus Zen to a PC using the Cronus’ rear USB port.

Hold down the Reset Button underneath the Cronus Zen. Its screen will say ‘Zen Bootloader’ and the device should then appear in the Update Tool. Follow the on-screen instructions to update the firmware. Close the tool when finished and unplug the Cronus Zen.

Hold the two blue buttons on top of the Cronus Zen and reconnect it to the PC again to hard reset it, again using the Cronus’ rear USB port.

After 4 seconds the LEDs will flash red, green, then blue, indicating a successful hard reset, erasing all memory slots and putting your Zen back to factory defaults.

Unplug Cronus Zen from your PC.

Open Zen Studio from the downloaded and unzipped folder and connect your ZEN to the PC using its ‘PROG’ USB Port this time, which is on the side of the Cronus.

Go to ‘Tools’ then select ‘Reset Zen Studio’ to reset all of Zen Studio’s settings back to its defaults.

When Zen Studio restarts, go to the ‘Device’ tab and make sure that both ‘PS4 Specialty’ and ‘PS Remote Play’ are ‘DISABLED’. Also check the Output Protocol is set to ‘AUTO’ and nothing else.

Step 3. Set up the Titan Two

Download and install some Titan Two software called ‘Gtuner IV’ from the Titan Two’s consoletuner.com website.

Once downloaded and installed, connect your Titan Two to a PC with its USB cable, using the PROG port on the back of the Titan Two. If you are prompted to update the firmware, follow the on-screen instructions.

Under Device Configuration, set the ‘Output Protocol’ to ‘USB Automatic’ and make sure ‘Recall loaded memory slot between power cycles’ is ticked, which will automatically load the profile we will put on next, instead of needing to manually select it using the buttons on the Titan Two device. Then select the tick box to ‘Power Off the device with the Console’. 

We need to install a script that blocks a bug that appears if using an XAC. It will also force the necessary ‘PS4 mode’. 

Click on the Device Configuration tab, and search ‘Online Resources’ with “adaptive Zen”, then drag the DRAG DROP box to a free memory slot.

Then, finally, click on the number of the memory slot you saved the profile to.

These settings will automatically save to your Titan Two.

Close Gtuner and unplug the Titan Two from your PC.

  

Step 4. Setting up equipment for the first time 

Connect the short cable that comes with the Cronus Zen to its ‘CONSOLE/PC’ USB port which is on the back of it.

Then connect a PlayStation 5 DualSense controller, to the ‘A1’ USB Port on the side of the Cronus Zen.

Use the short Titan Two USB cable to link the Titan Two OUTPUT port to the front left USB port of the Cronus Zen.

Connect your gaming controllers to the front of the Titan Two. Next, plug the short cable connected to the back of the Cronus Zen into your PlayStation 5 console.

You can turn on the PlayStation 5 by pressing the button on the front of the console or by using the PS Home button on the connected DualSense PlayStation 5 controller.

If the light on one or both of your alternative controllers is not on, you may need to manually turn the controller on.

If one or more high-powered USB devices are connected to the XAC, the Titan Two may need extra power.

Here, we are connecting a Micro USB to USB-C cable from the USB PROG port on the Titan Two, into the USB-C slot on the front of the console to give it the extra power needed for using this particular set-up.

 

Step 5. Playing after initial set-up

Connect the cable from the back of the Cronus Zen to your PlayStation 5.

Turn on the PlayStation 5 from the front of the console or using the PS Home button on the DualSense controller.

If you are using an additional cable to give extra power to the Titan Two, connect this as well.

If the light on one or both of your alternative controllers is not on, you may need to manually turn the controller on.

Turn off the console in the usual way, in the PlayStation Home menu.

Unplug the Cronus Zen from the PlayStation 5.

If you are using an additional cable to give extra power to the Titan Two, unplug this as well.

Original Article:

PlayStation 5 Access (with Cronus Zen + Titan Two Daisy Chain)

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Method 2. Besavior + Titan Two (for one or two alternative controllers on PS5)

This method also uses two adapters (a Besavior and a Titan Two) to enable two alternative controllers to be used simultaneously. 

The Besavior allows you to use one alternative controller on the PS5 console, whilst the Titan Two enables you to use an XAC (which is not compatible just using the Besavior), and also to add an additional controller to use two alternative controllers simultaneously, if needed.

Set-up video:

Please note, the LEDs on the Besavior, Titan Two and the Xbox Adaptive Controller will appear differently in person to how they appear on-screen.
Show Transcript

This video will show how to use a Besavior and a Titan Two device to use an Xbox Adaptive Controller on PlayStation 5. This is a method that is currently allowing us to play PlayStation 5 games on the console with an Xbox Adaptive Controller, without using PS Remote Play.

The Besavior itself can be used as a stand-alone controller with back paddles, but it also has a feature that allows you to connect different controllers through it to use on the PlayStation 5 console.

In this set-up we are using it for this second feature and not for the back paddles. It is, however, needed for touchpad, Sixaxis and microphone access, but the rest of the inputs on the Besavior will not work.

We are using the Titan Two device in this set-up to enable us to use the Xbox Adaptive Controller with the Besavior and also to allow us to use a co-pilot controller alongside it.

 

Step 1. Set up the Titan Two

First, we will need to put a script onto a free slot on a Titan Two to help these devices to work.

You do this by downloading some Titan Two software called ‘Gtuner’ from the Titan Two’s consoletuner.com website.

Once downloaded and installed, connect your Titan Two to a PC with its USB cable, using the prog port on the back of the Titan Two.

In Gtuner, select ‘File’, ‘New’, ‘Minimum GPC Script’ and give it a name.

Then visit the forums on the Console Tuner website to locate and copy the script. The link to this page is in the video description.

Paste the code into the space in the script and then put it onto a free slot by selecting the ‘Install Active Code to Memory Slot’ icon and choose a free slot. In this case we put it onto slot ‘2’.

Then click on the number of the slot you have put the profile on.

You also need to set the ‘Output Protocol’ to ‘USB Automatic’ by going to ‘Device Configuration’, then selecting ‘USB Automatic’ from the drop-down option.

Under Device Configuration, you can also select ‘Recall loaded memory slot between power cycles’ to automatically load your profile instead of manually selecting it on the Titan Two device’.

You can then close Gtuner and remove the Titan Two from your PC. You can now use the Titan Two in this set-up.

 

Step 2. PlayStation 5 console settings

You will need to make sure your PlayStation 5 console is set so that controllers are used via a USB cable and not via Bluetooth. To do this, in the PlayStation Home menu navigate to “Settings”, select “Accessories” and go into “Controller (General)”, then select “Communication Method” and set it to ‘Use USB Cable’ instead of ‘Use Bluetooth’.

 

Step 3. First time equipment set-up

Turn on the PlayStation 5 console.

Link the Xbox Adaptive Controller to the front of the Titan Two. You can also connect another compatible controller to use alongside it, in the second slot.

Connect the ‘on the go’ USB adapter that comes with the Besavior and then use the short cable that comes with the Titan Two to link the Titan Two via the OUTPUT port to the Besavior. 

To give the Titan Two the extra power it needs, we are connecting a Micro USB to USB-C cable from the USB PROG port on the Titan Two, into the USB-C slot on the front of the console.

You can now connect the Besavior via USB, to the PlayStation 5 console. Make sure you are in the correct Titan Two memory slot. Here we select slot 2, where our profile is.

When prompted on-screen to ‘press the ‘PS’ button on your controller’, you need to press the Xbox button on the Xbox Adaptive Controller.

When you are using this set-up, you need to make sure that you always turn your PlayStation 5 on at the console, not the controller. Otherwise, the controller might connect wirelessly, and the set-up won’t work. 

 

Step 4. Playing after initial set-up 

Next time you want to play, turn on the PlayStation 5 using the power button on the front of the console. Then connect the Besavior again, along with the extra power to the Titan Two.

Make sure you are in the correct Titan Two memory slot.

When prompted on-screen to ‘press the ‘PS’ button on your controller’, press the Xbox button on the Xbox Adaptive Controller.

To turn off the console, do this in the normal way in the PlayStation menu…and then unplug the Besavior from the console and also unplug the additional power to the Titan Two.

Original Article:

Using the Xbox Adaptive Controller on PlayStation 5 (via a Besavior x Titan Two)

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Method 3. Cronus Zen (for one alternative controller on PS5)

This method uses one adapter (a Cronus Zen) to enable one alternative controller, such as an XAC, a DualShock 4 or an Xbox One or Series controller, to be used.

*Update 25/01/24* – Unfortunately, the latest PS5 Update (24.01-08.60.00) stops the Cronus Zen device from functioning, so this set-up is not currently working. It will, however, still work if you have not yet carried out the (optional) update.

Set-up video:

Please note, the LEDs on the Cronus Zen will appear differently in person to how they appear on-screen.
Show Transcript

In this video, we will look at how to set up a Cronus Zen to use alternative controllers like an Xbox Adaptive Controller, an Xbox One or Series controller or a DualShock 4 controller to play PlayStation 5 games on a PlayStation 5 console.

The PlayStation 5’s DualSense, whilst connected as part of the set-up to verify the Cronus Zen, cannot be used for controls whilst another controller is connected to the Cronus Zen.

So, for touchpad or motion controls, you will need to temporarily unplug the alternative controller to use the connected DualSense, unless using a DualShock 4 controller as the alternative controller, which does have motion and touchpad controls.

Step 1. PlayStation 5 Console Settings

You will need to make sure your PlayStation 5 console is set so that controllers are used via a USB cable and not via Bluetooth.

To do this, in the PlayStation Home menu, navigate to ‘Settings’, select ‘Accessories’, go into ‘Controller’, then select, ‘Communication Method’ and set it to ‘Use USB Cable’ instead of ‘Use Bluetooth’.

Step 2. Set Up the Cronus Zen

Download the software currently in beta from beta.cronusmax.com/ps5-beta and unzip the folder.

Open the ‘cm update tool’ file from the downloaded and unzipped folder to open the ‘Collective Minds Firmware Update Tool’ and connect the Cronus Zen to a PC using the Cronus’ rear USB port.

Hold down the Reset Button underneath the Cronus Zen. Its screen will say ‘Zen Bootloader’ and the device should then appear in the Update Tool. Follow the on-screen instructions to update the firmware. Close the tool when finished and unplug the Cronus Zen.

Hold the two blue buttons on top of the Cronus Zen and reconnect it to the PC again to hard reset it, again using the Cronus’ rear USB port.

After 4 seconds the LEDs will flash red, green then blue indicating a successful hard reset, erasing all memory slots and putting your Zen back to factory defaults.

Unplug the Cronus Zen from your PC.

Open Zen Studio from the downloaded and unzipped folder and connect your Zen to the PC using its ‘PROG’ USB Port this time, which is on the side of the Cronus.

Go to ‘Tools’, then select ‘Reset Zen Studio’ to reset all of Zen Studio’s settings back to its defaults.

When Zen Studio restarts, go to the ‘Device’ tab and make sure that both ‘PS4 Specialty’ and ‘PS Remote Play’ are ‘DISABLED’. Also check the output protocol is set to ‘AUTO’ and nothing else.

Step 3. Setting up equipment for the first time

Connect the short cable that comes with the Cronus Zen to its ‘CONSOLE/PC’ USB port, which is on the back of it.

Then connect a PlayStation 5 DualSense controller, to the ‘A1’ USB Port on the side of the Cronus Zen.

Connect your compatible alternative controller to the front left USB port of the Cronus Zen.

Next, plug the short cable connected to the back of the Cronus Zen into your PlayStation 5 console.

You can turn on the PlayStation 5 by pressing the button on the front of the console or by using the PS Home button on the connected DualSense PlayStation 5 controller.

Step 4. Playing after initial set-up

Connect the cable from the back of the Cronus Zen to your PlayStation 5.

Turn on the PlayStation 5 from the front of the console or using the PS Home button on the DualSense controller.

Turn off the console in the usual way, in the PlayStation Home menu.

Unplug the Cronus Zen from the PlayStation 5.

Original Article:

Using a Single Alternative Controller on PlayStation 5 (using a Cronus Zen)

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Method 4. Besavior (for one alternative controller on PS5 (XAC not compatible))

This method also allows a single alternative compatible controller to be used through the Besavior, but unlike the Cronus Zen in Method 3, you are unable to use an XAC with this method. You can use a DualShock 4, Xbox One/Series or Nintendo Switch Pro controller.

To use an XAC with a Besavior, you would need to add a Titan Two adapter, as demonstrated in Method 2.

More information:

Besavior Controller Expansion Feature for PS5

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Method 5. PS Remote Play + Titan Two (for one or two alternative controllers on PS5)

This method uses a Titan Two adapter on a PC or PS4 console to allow you to use one or two alternative controllers to control your PS5 console via the internet using the PS Remote play app. It may be a good idea to check that your internet is fast and stable enough before purchasing additional equipment, by trying out the PS Remote Play app, first.

You can already use a DualShock 4 without an adapter with PS Remote play, but using a Titan Two lets you use an alternative controller (such as an Xbox One or Series controller or an XAC) or combine two, to use two controllers simultaneously. 

Further information on what you need can be found on the PlayStation website: PS Remote Play

Original Article:

PS Remote Play x Titan Two | Play PS5 Games with Alternative Controllers

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Method 6. PS Remote Play + reWASD (for one alternative controller on PS5)

This method uses a piece of software called reWASD on a PC to use one connected alternative controller to control a PS5 console, via PS Remote play. This allows you to use an alternative controller, such as an XAC or an Xbox One or Series controller to play.

As before, it may be a good idea to check that your internet is fast and stable enough before purchasing additional equipment or software, by trying out the PS Remote Play app, first.

Original Article:

PS Remote Play x reWASD | Play PS5 Games with Alternative Controllers

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Further information:

You can use the ‘PS5 Access‘ tag on the GameAccess site, to access posts related to accessing the PS5 console.

The ‘PlayStation‘ category also shares PS5 game settings related to the motor accessibility of games and equipment for PlayStation Console access, too. 

Information on the PlayStation 5 Access Controller, to be released later this year, can be found here:

Sony’s Project Leonardo for PlayStation 5

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