Street Fighter 6 | Motor Accessibility Video

Show Transcript

In this video, we will be looking at the motor accessibility options available in Street Fighter 6 [PEGI 12]. Street Fighter 6 is a 2D fighting game available on PlayStation 4 and 5, Xbox Series S and X, as well as PC.

We will be looking at the differences between the Modern, Dynamic, and Classic control schemes. The Modern and Dynamic options modify and automate certain control actions within the game, such as performing combos and special moves. This results in the potential to remove the need for simultaneous button and joystick inputs, reduce the complexity of joystick motions or to reduce the number of inputs required to play the game.

We will also look at the various remapping settings, which allow you to customise most of the game’s inputs, along with other potentially helpful settings such as Negative Edge.

Control Schemes

Street Fighter 6 is what’s known as a traditional six-button fighting game, where you use combinations of light, medium, and heavy punches and kicks alongside directional inputs from the D-pad or joystick to whittle your opponent’s health down to zero and win the round.

The Classic Controls scheme offers a traditional method of access, where a player would typically perform synchronous motions and inputs, for example, moving the joystick a quarter circle turn forwards and then pressing a button. This can be challenging for players who find synchronous movements or tight timing windows difficult. The Classic Control method is available in both online and offline multiplayer.

If Classic Controls are proving challenging, Street Fighter 6 offers two other control schemes: Modern Controls and Dynamic Controls.

Modern Controls

Modern Controls is a control scheme new to Street Fighter 6. This modifies the controls from the classic six buttons and complex joystick inputs to eight buttons. This removes the need for complicated joystick motions.

The reason for the extra buttons is that some special moves that previously required multiple button inputs or complicated joystick motions have now been moved to their own dedicated button.

Throw, which normally requires two face buttons to be pressed simultaneously, can now be performed with a single press of the Left Trigger.

Drive Impact, a new special move introduced to Street Fighter 6, received the same treatment. This goes from multiple inputs required to a single press of the Left Bumper.

Drive Parry, a special form of blocking unique to Street Fighter 6, also receives its own button. This is now triggered by a single press of the Right Bumper.

Finally, Modern Controls adds an entirely new button to the control scheme called the Assist button, which can be triggered by holding down the Right Trigger and pressing a face button simultaneously. Whilst this does add a simultaneous input to the control scheme, using the Assist button in tandem with the now four fighting Move buttons, Light, Medium, Heavy, and Special, will perform an auto combo, with the medium and heavy auto combos ending in super moves. So, whilst adding one extra button, it removes the need to perform multiple complex strings of motion and button inputs. This can be helpful to players who struggle to string combos together.

Speaking of the assisted combos, it is worth noting a couple of things:

Firstly, while using Modern Controls you will not have access to all of your character’s moves. However, many of the special moves can still be inputted using the Classic Control method. So, if you’re able to perform some of, but not all of, the inputs, the Modern Control scheme may be a better fit for you.

Secondly, for the purposes of preserving online competitive integrity, the assisted special moves of Modern Controls will deal 20% less damage than their Classic Control counterparts. Whilst noticeable, many players have found success both online and in local competitive play to the highest ranks using Modern Controls. This damage reduction only applies to the special moves performed by the auto combo feature. Inputting the Classic Control motion inputs for a special move will not incur the 20% damage reduction.

Modern Controls are available in both online and offline multiplayer.

Dynamic Controls

Dynamic Controls is the third and final control scheme offered by Street Fighter 6. This offers a heavily assisted and greatly simplified access method. This reduces the required inputs down to just three buttons and a joystick.

Many of the other buttons remain from modern controls, such as throw and drive parry on the bumper buttons. However, with the assistance Dynamic Controls provide, they are not necessarily needed to have a good time.

So how do Dynamic Controls work?

Dynamic Controls use AI to assist the player in most aspects of fighting gameplay.

With a single press of either the Light, Medium, or Heavy buttons, your character will perform an entire combo, including special moves.

The Dynamic Control AI will also factor in your distance from the opponent and will perform a move or combo appropriately.

For example, while playing the character Ryu, if you perform a Light attack at close range, you will get a short combo. However, pressing the same button at medium to long range will perform Ryu’s famous hadouken fireball.

The same holds true for both Medium and Heavy attack buttons.

Dynamic Controls are not available to use in online multiplayer. However, they can be used in single player modes such as Arcade Story and Local Versus mode.

Button Remapping and Player Profiles

Street Fighter 6 offers an interesting mix of remapping options, which can be found in the Settings menu under the Controls tab.

The first thing you are likely to notice is that the Controls menu is subdivided into different categories for different types of gameplay.

There are three main sections:

1. Overworld Control Settings: This allows players to remap how they control their characters in the overworld of the World Tour and Battle Hub modes of the game.

2. Avatar Battle Control Type: Within the Battle Hub online multiplayer section of the game, it is possible to fight other players’ avatars in the central ring. This setting lets you choose if you wish to use either the Modern or Classic Controls schemes.

3. Player 1 and 2 Control Settings: This allows you to assign separate control set-ups and remapping to players 1 and 2 independently. If you are playing regularly with someone else in person, say a family member or friend, you can both save preferences that suit you, which the game will remember.

Inside the Player Control Settings menu, you will find the following:

· Control Type: This is where you can choose between Classic, Modern, and Dynamic Control types mentioned previously.

· Button Preset: Street Fighter 6 lets you save five separate button profiles per player per Control Type for a total of 15 profiles. This enables family and friends to set up a control scheme that works for them. So, if your brother likes playing with the Dynamic controls with the A and X buttons swapped around, but your friend likes playing with the Modern controls and just the default layout, they can each save their own button profiles which can easily be swapped between at any time. This setting can also be useful if you find having the buttons mapped a certain way or playing with a certain control scheme for certain characters easier. You may wish to do this if you find certain characters’ special moves harder to perform than others. You can also name each preset to help you keep track.

· Button Release Input: otherwise known as Negative Edge, is a setting found in some fighting games which will modify when the game will read your inputs. With the setting turned Off the game will read a single press of the button as a single input. If the setting is turned On the game will now read pressing and releasing the button as two separate instances of activating the input. This setting may be helpful if you find repeated button presses difficult.

Edit Control Mapping

Under Edit Control Mapping you can choose which controller buttons trigger which in-game actions. For example, if you prefer to have heavy punch as the A button, simply hover over the heavy punch option and press A. The game will swap the two actions around. Whatever used to be on A – in this case light kick – will now be triggered by the right bumper, and whatever used to be triggered by the right bumper, heavy punch, will now be triggered by pressing A. It is worth noting you cannot remap the joystick and movement options. You can only remap the inputs required to perform combat actions such as punching and kicking.

Edit Control Mapping works in tandem with the Button Preset and Control Type options.

This can get a little confusing, so I’ll do my best to explain.

To sum up, there are three Control Types. Each one allows you to have five customised profiles. Five for Classic, five for Modern, and five for Dynamic, for a total of 15 possible customised button profiles per player.

There is also a Test option, that allows you to check everything is in its proper place and working.

Adjustable Deadzones

Under the Controls heading in the Options menu, you can select Other Input Settings. This adjusts the deadzone of the left and right sticks independently. A deadzone simply adjusts how far you need to move the joystick in order for the game to register that movement as an action. For example, if you find small movements easier, you can set the deadzone to be very low, so that you only need to move the joystick a little bit to make your character move. The same applies vice versa for those who wish the joystick to not be triggered so easily. You can set the deadzone number to be higher. This may be helpful for individuals with tremors or involuntary movements. This setting doesn’t work for fights. It’s mainly used to help you navigate the open world of World Tour and the Battle Hub modes.

Offline Difficulty Options

Available only in select offline game modes, Street Fighter 6 offers a variety of ways to modify the game’s difficulty.

In Versus mode, both against players and the CPU, in the Character Select screen, you can press the right bumper to access the Advantage menu. This enables you to increase your own power through five intervals represented by stars. These advantage stars increase the damage you deal, the amount of SA Gauge you start with, traditionally known as a Super Meter, alongside increasing health regeneration rates, and decreasing your drive meter consumption. This system may be helpful in providing an equal playing field between players of differing abilities.

Arcade Story Mode: This does not offer the Advantage system. However, it does offer a traditional difficulty selection, ranging from easiest to hardest.

If you’re a game developer interested in more video examples of how other developers have increased the motor accessibility of their games, such as the features covered in this video, please visit the SpecialEffect DevKit at specialeffectdevkit.info.

For instance, to see how other developers have offered alternative actions for players, as the Modern controls in Street Fighter 6 do, you can visit module 7.2 in the DevKit under the ‘Simplification’ section.

For further examples of games that enable the player to reduce the amount of inputs required by predicting the actions they wish to perform, similar to the Dynamic controls found in Street Fighter 6, please visit module 7.5 of the SpecialEffect DevKit which covers Action Predictions.

Street Fighter 6 [PEGI 12] is the latest instalment in the Street Fighter franchise as of 2024. Take to the streets and customise your own fighter in World Tour mode, or jump into multiplayer and battle it out with your friends.

In this video we will be looking at the options available that are related to motor accessibility, such as Modern and Dynamic controls, which modify and automate certain control actions within the game, such as performing combos and special moves. This results in the potential to remove the need for simultaneous button and joystick inputs, reduce the complexity of joystick motions or to reduce the number of inputs required to play the game.

We will also look at the various remapping settings, which allow you to customise most of the game’s inputs, along with other potentially helpful settings such as long pause and negative edge.

Timestamps:

0:00 | Intro

0:46 | Control Schemes

1:09 | Classic Controls

1:38 | Modern Controls

4:13 | Dynamic Controls

5:40 | Button Remapping and Player Profiles

6:00 | Overworld Control Settings

6:10 | Avatar Battle Control Type

6:25 | Player 1 & 2 Control Settings

7:47 | Button Release Input

8:17 | Edit Control Mapping

9:30 | Adjustable Deadzones

10:23 | Offline Difficulty Options

The information in this video is correct to the best of our knowledge at the time of publishing (May 2024).


Developer Resource:

SpecialEffect DevKit logo

For more video examples of how developers have improved the motor accessibility of their games, please visit https://specialeffectdevkit.info/

For instance, more examples of games offering players alternative actions like the ‘Modern Controls’ option does in Street Fighter 6, can be found in the Simplification topic in module 7.2 .

Whilst in module 7.5, you can find examples of how games have used action predictions in a similar way that Street Fighter 6’s ‘Dynamic Controls’ do.


Video by Tom Williams 

Music: WEARETHEGOOD: Feel So Good 71, Omri Smader: Tulips and Tomas Novoa: Vuelta al Sol

Voice Control Series: A Beginner’s Guide to Using Voice Controls for Gaming

Screen shot of Minecraft being used with voice control

Please use the YouTube player controls to navigate through the series. A transcript for each video can be found on YouTube. 

This voice control series was made possible thanks to the knowledge and insight of the Voiced Gaming YouTube channel. 

In this voice control series we hope to consolidate the many years of experience in voice control by Voiced Gaming and ourselves into a beginner-friendly tutorial series. The tutorials in this series are aimed at being a helpful resource for new and intermediate voice control users. For more advanced techniques please consider visiting the Voiced Gaming YouTube Channel: 

https://www.youtube.com/c/VoicedGaming

Some players with clear speaking voices may be considering the possibility of using voice controls as their access method. However, they may not necessarily know where to start. 

The SpecialEffect YouTube channel now hosts a voice control video series, consisting of 16 individual videos that aim to assist newcomers to voice controls. You should not need any prior experience or knowledge of voice controls in order to begin this series. 

The voice control series is split into several episodes, with some further broken up into smaller parts, with each episode focusing on a particular aspect of voice controls. 

Within this article you can find: 


Episodes

Episode 1 – Expectations & EquipmentEpisode 4 – Helpful Tips to Increase Quality
Episode 2 – Setting Up for PCEpisode 5 – How to Set Up & Use GAVPI
Episode 3 – Setting Up for ConsoleEpisode 6 – How to Set Up & Use VoiceAttack

Episode 1: Expectations & Equipment

In this episode we talk a new user through the equipment they will need to set up voice controls for both PC and console use. We also discuss some of the benefits and drawbacks of using voice as an input device. Hopefully this episode will aid a beginner in deciding if voice control may be suitable for them to try. 


Episode 2: Setting Up for PC

Episode 2 guides a beginner through the physical set-up of equipment needed to use voice controls on a PC. Please note, episode 2 focuses on explaining the setting up of equipment and software only and does not provide information on creating voice control profiles as this will be covered in episodes 5 & 6. Jump down to Download Links for relevant resources.


Episode 3: Setting Up for Console


Episode 3 guides a beginner through setting up voice controls for use on consoles via a PC. It is important to note that while some of the steps are the same as PC, voice control use on consoles requires additional equipment and software. The additional equipment needed is: 

  • 1 x Titan Two adapter – to connect the PC to the console and convert PC inputs into console inputs.
  • G-Tuner IV Software – to load and run the necessary profiles needed to set up the Titan Two.
  • 3 x Micro USB cables – to connect everything together.

Jump down to Download Links for relevant resources.


Episode 4: Tips for Using Voice Control

Episode 4 focuses on explaining some potentially helpful tips that may improve the quality of your voice control experience. For example, some tips include how to train your PC to recognise your speech, and what to do if your voice controls regularly mishear certain words. 


Episode 5: How to Set Up & Use GAVPI

Episode 5 focuses on guiding a beginner through the early stages of using the free voice control software called GAVPI. This software helps to give a new user a solid understanding of how inputs are produced which can help when making more advanced commands. Episode 5 has been separated into four subsequent parts, so that each part can be focused on individually. These are all available in the above playlist, by using the YouTube player controls. The following episode (Episode 6) covers similar topics but using software called VoiceAttack. VoiceAttack simplifies the user interface which may make it easier to use. VoiceAttack also allows a user to control the mouse pointer via voice.

Please use the YouTube player controls above to navigate through the parts of this episode or use the links in the descriptions below. Jump down to Download Links for relevant resources.

Episode 5.1: Create and Load a Profile in GAVPI

Episode 5.1 shows how you can download & install the software, how you can create and load profiles, as well as how to create your first button press command. 

Episode 5.2: Create a Button Press in GAVPI

In episode 5.2 we will guide you through in detail how to set up button presses in GAVPI. Button presses are likely to be one of the most common inputs used in voice controls, and understanding exactly how they function can be important. 

Episode 5.3: Hold Down & Stop Commands in GAVPI

Episode 5.3 will guide you through how to create voice commands to hold a button down indefinitely. It will also show you how to release the button and create stop commands. Stop commands are incredibly important when using voice controls as they can be used to release all inputs should you get stuck.

Episode 5.4: Create Macro Commands in GAVPI

Episode 5.4 first introduces what a macro is, and then guides you through how you can string several button inputs together to make a macro of your own. In the video we create a macro to type the word “Hello”. However, macros can be used to replicate many complex functions of a game.

Disclaimer: Please be aware that if you intend to play and use macros online as it may trigger anti-cheat mechanisms. In some instances macros may be seen as giving a player an unfair advantage. If you are in doubt we recommend contacting the developer of your desired game and explaining how and why you intend to use your macros. 

Episode 6: How to Set Up & Use VoiceAttack

Episode 6 consists of several subsequent parts each focussing on guiding a new user through various elements of the VoiceAttack software. These are all available in the above playlist, by using the YouTube player controls. The previous episode (episode 5) covers similar topics but using free software called GAVPI. GAVPI is entirely free and helps to give a new user a solid understanding of how inputs are produced which can help when making more advanced commands, whilst VoiceAttack simplifies the user interface which may make it easier to use. VoiceAttack also allows a user to control the mouse pointer via voice.

Please use the YouTube player controls above to navigate through the parts of this episode or use the links in the descriptions below. Jump down to Download Links for relevant resources.

Episode 6.1: How to Load a Profile in VoiceAttack

Episode 6.1 gives a breakdown of the capabilities of the VoiceAttack software, and instructions on how to install the software and then guides a new user through how to create and load profiles.

Episode 6.2: How to Create a Button Press in VoiceAttack

Episode 6.2 discusses two potential methods of creating button presses within VoiceAttack.

  • The manual method – which mimics each individual action for increased control.
  • The simple method – a faster method of creating profiles. However, you lose the ability to control the individual timing of button presses.

Episode 6.3: How to Create Hold Down & Stop Commands in VoiceAttack

Episode 6.3 guides a new user through how they might create button hold commands, and several methods of stop command in order to release them. Stop commands are very important when using voice controls as they can help to release certain commands or reset you back to a neutral state should something go wrong.

Episode 6.4: How to Create Macro Commands in VoiceAttack

Episode 6.4 introduces what a macro is, and then guides you through how you can string several button inputs together to make a macro of your own. In the video we create a macro to type the word “Test”. However, macros can be used to replicate many complex functions of a game.

Disclaimer: Please be aware that if you intend to play and use macros online it may trigger anti cheat mechanisms. In some instances macros may be seen as giving a player an unfair advantage. If you are in doubt we recommend contacting the developer of your desired game and explaining how and why you intend to use your macros. 

Episode 6.5: How to Move the Mouse Pointer – Direct Coordinate Control

It is possible to move the mouse pointer using VoiceAttack. There are two main methods by which this can be achieved. In episode 6.5 we will discuss the first of these two methods: Direct Coordinate Control. Direct Coordinate Control moves the mouse pointer to a specific coordinate on the screen no matter where it was originally. This can be useful in games where certain buttons always appear in the same place, such as Menu Options or Hotbar Actions. 

Jump down to Download Links for relevant resources.

Episode 6.6: How to Move the Mouse – Continuous Mouse Movement

Episode 6.6 discusses the second method of how to move a mouse pointer via voice control: Continuous Mouse Movement. 

Continuous Mouse Movement attempts to replicate the movement of a mouse pointer across the screen in real time. This can be particularly important in three-dimensional games where the mouse pointer often controls where the camera is looking.

Episode 6.7: Continuous Mouse Movement [part 2] – Using Continuous Mouse Movement in a Profile

Episode 6.7 builds upon the ideas discussed in episode 6.6. We discuss two methods of how a new user may wish to try implementing Continuous Mouse Movement into their voice control profiles. This is achieved through the use of a 1-9 naming system, for example, ‘Right 3’, ‘Up 4’, ‘Left 2’, etc. 

The first method is more beginner friendly and faster to implement, however, it leaves slight momentary pauses throughout the mouse movement. The second method offers smoother mouse movement. However, it takes considerably longer to implement. 

Episode 6.8: Using Multiple Command Words

The last episode in our voice control series, Episode 6.8 gives a brief introduction on how to have differing words, or combinations of words, trigger a single action in VoiceAttack. 


Throughout the series several programs, profiles, and differing software is referenced. For ease of use, links to all of the referenced materials can be found below: 

Voice Control Software:

GAVPI Download

VoiceAttack Download

SpecialEffect Voice Control Profiles: 

The following links include: 

  • Premade voice control profiles for PS4, Nintendo Switch, Xbox One
  • The necessary Gtuner profile to be placed in input 1 of a Titan Two Adapter

SpecialEffect GAVPI Voice Control Profiles

SpecialEffect VoiceAttack Voice Control Profiles

Gtuner IV  

To be used alongside a Titan Two Adapter for use on gaming consoles:

Gtuner IV: Titan Two Adapter Software

ConsoleController.gpc is the Titan Two profile responsible for converting computer inputs into console inputs.

ConsoleController-Suspend.gpc is a secondary profile to be loaded into slot 2 alongside ConsoleController (which would be in slot 1). ConsoleController-Suspend.gpc is responsible for some of the features utilised in the advanced voice control profiles provided.


Links to Other SpecialEffect Voice Control Resources

An Introduction to Voice Controls

How to Install the SpecialEffect Voice Control Script for Use on Console

How to Import Voice Control Profiles 

How to Set Up Voice Controls on Console

How to Use MishkinaMish to Turn Vocalisations into Keyboard & Mouse Movement

Thank you and happy gaming!

If you have any questions, please Contact Us.

Xbox Elite Wireless Controller Series 2

image of game controller

What is it?

On November 4th 2019 Microsoft launched their new Xbox One and Windows 10 controller, the Xbox Elite Wireless Controller Series 2, the successor to the original Elite controller.

The Elite Series 2 offers a host of customisability options. Standout features include: additional paddles on the back, adjustable and detachable thumb sticks of varying height and shape, wrap around grip, hair-pin triggers and interchangeable D-Pad options.

Optional components and charging dock Xbox Elite Wireless Controller Series 2

However, the features of the Xbox Elite Controller Series 2 are not just mechanical. Using the Xbox Accessories App on either Xbox One or Windows 10, you can also adjust a range of additional settings to suit your preferences such as input mapping, shifting and thumb-stick and trigger sensitivity.

What can it do?

Button Mapping

The controller supports three customised profiles saved to the controller at any one time, which may be shifted between by pushing the central profile button. A white light will display which corresponds to the current profile selected. 

Profile Select section in the Xbox Accessories App

The Elite Series 2 offers almost complete button remapping, including the paddles at the back of the controller. This combined allows the player to have three setups on demand for a variety of game genres. 

The controller also offers the ability to turn one of the remappable inputs into a ‘shift‘ button. This in turn allows for the remaining remappable inputs to have two inputs mapped to it. One as its primary command, when the Shift input is not activated, and another for when it is (like when you use shift on a keyboard).

Xbox Elite Controller Series 2 remapping section in the Xbox Accessories App

Trigger Adjustments

The Elite Series 2 offers the ability to adjust the trigger sensitivity with a flick of a mechanical ‘hair-trigger’ switch. This is done via a switch located on the back of the controller that will lock the trigger on one of three settings to activate, between full movement (standard controller trigger press), half movement, and a short movement.

Xbox says, “the hair-trigger mechanical switch works great for shooting games because it reduces how much you need to pull on the triggers to fire. It may not work as well for driving games, as you need the accelerator to go the full distance for maximum acceleration.” Therefore, adjusting the trigger sensitivity in the app may be useful. Other settings can also be adjusted in the app, which we will outline below.

In addition to the adjustable mechanical hair-triggers, you can also adjust the trigger sensitivity further through the Xbox Accessories App.

Here you can select at exactly which point of the trigger pull you would like the action to take place. This allows you to set deadzones and an activation point. 

You may also set a false activation zone. That is to say, a set amount of trigger pull where nothing at all will happen. For instance, this may be useful for individuals who sometimes may accidentally press the trigger. 

Both left and right triggers can be customised independently. 

Trigger adjustment section on the Xbox Accessories App

Thumb-stick Adjustments

The thumb-sticks may also be adjusted to suit various requirements. 

The controller comes with four detachable magnetic thumb-sticks of differing shapes, sizes, and heights. 

When the thumb-stick is removed, you can use the silver key tool that comes with the controller to adjust the screw inside the thumb-stick housing. This adjusts the force required to move the thumb-stick.

This adjustment has three settings to choose between: light, medium, or heavy. For reference, ‘light’ has been described as similar to the weight of an Xbox 360 controller.

The thumb-sticks may also be adjusted in the Xbox Accessories App to change how their physical movement responds in-game. 

Thumb-stick adjustment section in the Xbox Accessories App

The App has several preset options that affect the sensitivity and behavior of both of the thumb-sticks. These settings may be a little daunting at first, as it is quite different to some of the simpler sensitivity sliders seen in some games. 

Xbox say of the setting, “you can select Default, Delay, Aggressive, Instant or Smooth, depending on how responsive you want the stick to be in your game. For example, if you want the controller to respond faster over a shorter stick movement, select Instant. You’ll see a graph that shows you a visualisation of the response curve of the stick. Note Depending on the game you play, these settings will have different responses. One way to test your settings is to set Slot 1 to Default and Slot 2 to your customized setting.”

You can also get visual feedback of these settings in the App. When you move the thumb-stick you will see two round icons moving as well. One coloured one, in this case orange, and a separate black/grey translucent one. 

Thumb-stick adjustment section in the Xbox Accessories App with preview interface

In the example above with the Sensitivity Curve set to Instant, if you moved the thumb-stick to the left (black symbol), the software (coloured symbol) is responding to exagerate the movement further, which would be felt in-game.

If you wish for the aided adjustment by the software to be increased or lessened, you would adjust the Curve Adjustment slider on the left hand side.

Thumb-stick sensitivity curves options

Vibration Adjustments

You can adjust the vibration strength for each or the four rumble motors in the controller (left trigger, right trigger, left handle and right handle) independently, between 0-100%.

Thank you and happy gaming!

If you have any questions, please Contact Us.

For more information on the controller visit: https://www.xbox.com/en-GB/accessories/controllers/elite-wireless-controller-series-2